Newsfeeds

Webform Submissions Delete

New Drupal Modules - 19 July 2019 - 5:52am

This module cab be used to delete the
webform submissions using start date,
end date all at once.

This module will create menu under the webform
Results tab, with the help of his user can select
the submission(s) to delete.

Categories: Drupal

Gábor Hojtsy: First beta of Upgrade Status for Drupal 8 out with highly improved reporting, helps to best collaborate with project maintainers

Planet Drupal - 19 July 2019 - 5:31am

On our way to Drupal 9 every site will need to take care of making updates to their custom code as well as updating their contributed projects. However this time, instead of needing to rewrite code, only smaller changes are needed. Most contributed modules will only need to deal with a couple changes. Collaborating with project maintainers is the best way to get to Drupal 9. The first beta of the Upgrade Status module alongside recent drupal.org changes focus on making this much easier.

Upgrade Status beta provides better insight into Drupal 9 readiness

Take the first beta of the Upgrade Status module and run it on your site. It will provide executive summaries of results about all scanned projects and lets you inspect each individually.

Custom and contributed projects are grouped and summarised separately. You should be able to do all needed changes to your custom code, while for contributed projects you should keep them up to date in your environment and work with the maintainers to get to Drupal 9. The later is facilitated by displaying available update information inline and by pulling the Drupal 9 plan information from drupal.org projects and displaying it directly on the page.

This is how the summary looks like after scanning a few projects:

Digging deeper from the executive summary, you can review each error separately. The beta release now categorizes issues found to actionable (Fix now) and non-actionable (Fix later) categories with a Check manually category for items where it cannot decide based on available information. For custom projects, any deprecation is fixable that has replacements in your environment while for contributed projects supporting all core versions with security support the window is shifted by a year. Only deprecations from two or more releases earlier can be fixed (compared to the latest Drupal release) while keeping Drupal core support. So somewhat ironically, Upgrade Status itself has deprecated API uses that it cannot yet fix (alongside ones it could fix, but we have them for testing purposes specifically):

The module is able to catch some types of PHP fatal errors (unfortunately there are still some in projects that we need to figure out the best way to catch). The @deprecated annotation information guiding you on how to fix the issues found are also displayed thanks to lots of work by Matt Glaman.

Own a Drupal.org project? Direct contributors to help you the way you prefer!

If you own a Drupal.org project that has Drupal 8 code, you should specify your Drupal 9 plans. It is worth spending time to fill in this field to direct contributors to the best way you prefer them help you, so contributions can be a win-win for you and your users alike. Whether it is a META issue you plan to collect work or a specific time in the future you will start looking at Drupal 9 deprecations or a funding need to be able to move forward, letting the world know is important. This allows others to engage with you the way you prefer them to. Additionally to it being displayed in Upgrade Status's summary it is also displayed directly on your project page!

Go edit your project and find the Drupal 9 porting info field to fill in. Some suggestions are provided for typical scenarios:

This will then be displayed on your project page alongside usage and security coverage information. For example, check it out on the Upgrade Status project page.

Thanks

Special thanks for dedicated contributors and testers of the Upgrade Status module who helped us get to beta, especially Karl Fritsche (bio.logis), Nancy Rackleff (ThinkShout), Tsegaselassie Tadesse (Axelerant), Bram Goffings (Nascom), Travis Clark (Worthington Libraries), Mats Blakstad (Globalbility), Tony Wilson (UNC Pembroke), Alex Pott (AcroMedia, Thunder), Charlie ChX Negyesi (Smartsheet), Meike Jung (hexabinær Kommunikation). Thanks to Neil Drumm (Drupal Association) and Angela Byron (Acquia) for collaboration on the Drupal 9 plan field.

Categories: Drupal

Page Maintenance Mode

New Drupal Modules - 19 July 2019 - 5:04am

The Page Maintenance Mode module is very useful module. Site admin can put specific page into maintenance mode. Only site admin can see maintenance page. Using this module site admin can put multiple pages into maitenance mode and configure maintenance page message according to their requirement.

This module will create an admin configuration page.
admin/config/pagemaintenance/settings
This configuration page will have three option checkbox, page url and maintenance mode message.

Categories: Drupal

Ecomail webform

New Drupal Modules - 19 July 2019 - 4:41am

Ecomail webform adds Webform handler to add contact to the list of direct e-mailing service Ecomail.cz.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal marketplace

New Drupal Modules - 19 July 2019 - 4:33am

Simple UI tool that will help to find and install module/themes without help of the Drupal Console/Drush or attendance of the drupal.org

Categories: Drupal

Themes marketplace

New Drupal Modules - 19 July 2019 - 4:26am
Categories: Drupal

heykarthikwithu: Configure Redis, Set & Get Cache key values from Redis in Drupal

Planet Drupal - 19 July 2019 - 2:30am
Configure Redis, Set & Get Cache key values from Redis in Drupal

Redis is an open-source, networked, in-memory, key-value data store that can be used as a drop-in caching backend for your Drupal, Add the Redis module from Drupal.org, Enable the module & Verify Redis is enabled.

heykarthikwithu Friday, 19 July 2019 - 15:00:23 IST
Categories: Drupal

Conventional Snacking

Gnome Stew - 19 July 2019 - 1:00am

Sometimes at cons I feel like the Templeton from Charlotte’s Web…

From the obligatory treats to share at game night to the nearly professional planning that some people put into convention supplies, we gamers really like our snacks. While I am not necessarily the best person to be giving advice on nutrition, I attend enough conventions to have some experience on the subject. After getting back from Queen City Conquest this past weekend, I thought it might be worth diving into the topic in relation to snacking (or eating in general) at conventions.

Most of us go into game conventions knowing our regular eating habits are going to be changed up for the duration, either a little or a lot. Maybe you’re not going to be eating as healthy as you do at home, maybe you’re going to be eating less frequently than you do at home, maybe there’s going to be a little more alcohol than normal. There are differences between large cons in big cities with many options or smaller cons with limited nearby choices for food or snacks, but your regular habits are still going to go off kilter.

It’s super easy to fall into unhealthy choices. The most convenient food to access or buy during conventions isn’t necessarily the best for you, leading to lots of fast food and few fresh, healthy options, and snacks are often just sweet or salty with little in between. Now, when you’re young and invincible, this might be just fine with a packed schedule of awesome gaming and not enough sleep, but as someone who is no longer young and absolutely not invincible, I can wreck myself during a convention if I’m not careful. I currently travel with an emergency supply of Tums, just in case. Not to mention, I know the crappier I eat, the larger the chance I’ll go home to develop a lovely case of Con Crud.

Here’s some thoughts on the subject:

  • Water, Water, Everywhere. All good convention guides or tips will remind you to stay hydrated, and this one is no different. I’m touching on this point first because it is really so crucial. You can get your caffeine in whatever manner suits you, and you do you when it comes to the bars in the evening, but absolutely keep a water bottle handy. Most hotels and convention centers will have water out for the attendees, so make sure you take advantage. Even smaller cons will often note where the water fountains are or have bottles of water on hand. I mentioned that whole not being young thing anymore, so let me tell you that getting dehydrated becomes harder and harder to deal with as you get older. So yeah, drink lots of water.
  • Healthy, Portable Snacks. While it seems easiest to load up on salty and sugary snacks, it is possible to bring some healthier snacks along with you. Celery sticks and carrot sticks are pretty easy to pack in small containers and actually keep quite well. Nuts are also quite portable and offer a relatively healthy boost. If you’ve got to mix in a bit of chocolate, make your own trail mix. It’s always nice to be able to choose what you want in the mix and not end up with a pile of what you don’t want left in the bag. I mean, raisins are fine but I don’t want THAT many in my trail mix.
  • Don’t Let Yourself Get Hangry. Regardless of what your plans are for meals, make sure you pack SOMETHING to snack on in times of need. No one wants a distracted or irritable player or GM that’s in need of a snack at their table. Having a granola bar or couple of pieces of candy to tide yourself over will go a long way to making sure you get through the con in one piece. Let’s say you’ve scheduled yourself two 4-hour games in a row and then plan on getting dinner after that. Well, 8ish hours can be too long for some folks to go without a snack. Be prepared to keep your energy and mood up so you can enjoy the games you’re there to play.
  • Go Easy on Yourself. I say this for two reasons. First, be kind to yourself. Maybe you intended to stick to your diet, but that goal went out the window on the first day of the con. Don’t beat yourself up over it. You can get back to your regular plans when you get home. Second, on the other side of the coin, don’t go completely hog wild with your choices. Just because you’ve decided to indulge doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be a little kind to your body. Maybe the next choice after that deliciously cheesy and greasy order of pizza logs is a salad or something a tiny bit healthier.
  • People Eat Together. Eating together is one a major bonding mechanism we use to grow closer to our friends. Take advantage of being at a con with all kinds of awesome people to plan meals together and enjoy each other’s company. Another option is to bring enough snacks to share at the gaming table. I have a handful of friends who will bring bags of candy to share with whoever even glances at the bag of goodies. Another friend always makes sure he has a couple extra water bottles on him to hand to folks who look like they’re in need.

Ultimately, the Sunday of the con comes around and you’ll see the over planner trying to hand off the leftover snacks they brought. Even if they have a ludicrous amount to get rid of, I can guarantee you they’re happy they brought enough to share and make it through the convention with some tasty snacks.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

How Satisfactory's network optimizations keep multiplayer factories humming along

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 18 July 2019 - 11:34pm

Coffee Stain Studios' Gafgar Davallius reveals how Satisfactory is optimized for multiplayer while "handling a base with over 2000 conveyors, transporting thousands upon thousands of items." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Rain Walk-Through for Authors & Admins

Planet Drupal - 18 July 2019 - 11:49am

Mediacurrent created the Rain Install Profile to build fast, consistent Drupal websites and improve the editorial experience. Rain expedites website creation, configuration, and deployment.

In this article, we will walk through each of the main features that ship with the Rain distribution. This tutorial is intended to help content authors and site administrators get set up quickly with all that Rain has to offer.

Have a question or comment? Hit me up @drupalninja on Twitter.

Content Moderation

A question we often hear when working with a client is, “how can Drupal help build a publishing workflow that works for my team and business?"

Drupal 8 marked a big step forward for creating flexible editorial workflows. Building on Drupal 8's support for content moderation workflows, Rain comes pre-configured with a set of Workflow states. The term “states” refers to the different statuses your content can have throughout the publishing process - the four statuses available by default are “Draft”, “Needs Review”, “Published” and “Archived.” They can be easily enabled for any content type. As with everything in Drupal, these states and workflows are highly configurable. 

Once enabled, using content moderation in Drupal 8 is straightforward. After you save a piece of content, initially it will default to the “Draft” status which will remain unpublished. The “Review” status also preserves the unpublished status until the current edits get published. What’s great about Workflow in Drupal 8 is that you can make updates on a published piece of content without affecting the published state of that content until your changes are ready to be published. The video below demonstrates how to enable workflow and see draft updates before they are published.

To review any content currently in a workflow state you can click on the “Moderated Content” local task which is visible from the main Admin content screen (see below).
 

​​

Revisions

As a best practice, we recommend enabling revisions for all content. This allows editors to easily undo a change made by mistake and revisions keeps a full history of edits for each node. By default, all of Rain’s optional content features have revisions enabled by default. As illustrated below once you have made a save on a piece of content, the “Revisions” tab will appear with options for reviewing or reverting a change.

Media Library

Coming soon to Drupal core is an overhauled Media library feature. In the meantime, Drupal contrib offers some very good Media library features that are pre-configured in Rain. The Rain media features are integrated with most image fields including the “thumbnail” field on all content type features that ship with Rain.

The video below demonstrates two notable features. First is the pop-up dialog that shows editors all media available to choose from within the site. Editors can search or browse for an existing image if desired. Second is the drag-and-drop file upload which lets the editor user drag an image onto the dialog to immediately upload the file. 

 

WYSIWYG Media

Media is commonly embedded within the WYSIWYG editor in Drupal. Rain helps improve this experience by adding a button which embeds the Media library feature to be used within WYSIWYG. The key difference between the Media library pop-up you see on fields versus the pop-up you see within WYSIWYG is that here you will have an option to select the image style. The video below illustrates how this is done.

 

WYSIWYG Linkit

Another WYSIWYG enhancement that ships with Rain is the integrated “Linkit” module that gives users an autocomplete dialog for links. The short video below demonstrates how to use this feature.

Content Scheduling

A common task for content editors is scheduling content to be published at a future date and time. Rain gives authors the ability to schedule content easily from the content edit screen. Note that this feature will override the Workflow state so this should be considered when assigning user roles and permissions. The screenshot below indicates the location of the “Scheduling options” feature that appears in the sidebar on node edit pages.


Clean Aliases

Drupal is usually configured with the ability to set alias patterns for content. This will create the meaningful content “slugs” visitors see in the browser which also adheres to SEO best practices. Rain’s approach is to pre-load a set of sensible defaults that get administrators started quickly. The video below demonstrates how an admin user would configure an alias pattern for a content type.

XML Sitemap

By default, the Rain distribution generates a sitemap.xml feed populated with all published content. For editors, it can be important to understand how to exclude content from a sitemap or update the priority for SEO purposes. The screenshot below indicates where these settings live on the node edit page.

Metatag Configuration

The default configuration enabled by the Rain install profile should work well for most sites. Metatag, a core building block for your website’s SEO strategy, is also enabled for all optional content features that ship with the Rain distribution. To update meta tags settings on an individual piece of content, editors can simply edit the “Meta tags” area of the sidebar on the edit screen (see below).

Google Analytics

Enabling Google Analytics on your Drupal website is a very simple process. The Rain distribution installs the Google Analytics module by default but the tracking embed will not fire until an administrator has supplied a “Web Property ID.” The Google Analytics documentation shows you where to find this ID. To navigate to the Google Analytics settings page, look for the “Google Analytics” link on the main admin configuration page. Most of the default settings will work well without change and the only required setting is the “UA” ID highlighted below.

Enabling Content Features

Rain comes with many optional content features that can be enabled at any time. This includes content types, vocabularies, paragraphs, search and block types. Enabling a content feature will create the corresponding content type, taxonomy, etc. that can then be further customized. Any paragraph feature that is enabled will be immediately visible on any Rain content type that has enabled. Watch the video below to see an example of how to enable these features.

Wrapping Up

Mediacurrent created Rain to jump-start development and give editors the tools they need to effectively manage content. All features that ship with Rain are optional and highly configurable. We tried to strike a balance of pre-configuring as many essential modules as possible while still allowing site administrators to own the configuration of their Drupal site.

In the next tutorial, we will “pop open the hood” for Drupal developers to explain in technical detail how to build sites with Rain.

Categories: Drupal

Ubisoft says porting games to Stadia hasn't been a costly affair

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 18 July 2019 - 10:36am

Ubisoft is one of the major players known to be bringing existing games to Google Stadia and the company says that, at this stage, doing so hasn†™t been incredibly expensive. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Satisfactory: Network Optimizations - by Gafgar Davallius

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 July 2019 - 8:13am
We recently released our second big Update for Satisfactory and one of the things we improved is network performance. Running huge factory simulations over the network poses a unique challenge and I'm here to share our approach on solving it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Lullabot: Lullabot Podcast: Talking Continuous Integration

Planet Drupal - 18 July 2019 - 8:06am

Mike and Matt gather a fleet of Lullabots to talk the ins and outs of continuous integration (CI) in 2019.

Tools and Services mentioned in this episode:
  • Prettier - Code formatter

  • CircleCI - Continuous Integration service

  • Tugboat - Full website with every pull request

Categories: Drupal

My Roblox Years: Dungeon Life and New Product Science - by Jamie Fristrom

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 July 2019 - 7:31am
A retrospective on the years I spent developing professionally on the Roblox platform and how I attempted to apply new product science to game development there.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Seven Standards: 3. Gain Benefit - by Ben Follington

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 July 2019 - 7:23am
Allocate energy, effort, time and money to areas consistent with your own values and skills. Understanding your own strengths, weaknesses, goals and values allows you to find a place where you can work to your best. Insist on appropriate compensation.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Artist Dilemma in Game Development - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 July 2019 - 7:22am
Is it better to design a game for art or one for money? We're talking the artist dilemma in today's post, and how the best designers can do both.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Pre-Mortem for VR Kickstarter “Paranormal Detective: Escape from the 80’s” - by Laura Tallardy

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 July 2019 - 7:22am
A quick summary of the prep & launch of our VR game Kickstarter campaign.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Writing Characters for Shadowgun Legends: Part Two - by Lee Adams

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 July 2019 - 7:20am
This is the second part of my article about writing dialogue and developing characters for the NPCs in our latest game, Shadowgun Legends...
Categories: Game Theory & Design

wishdesk.com: Registration Confirm Email Address: simple module for Drupal

Planet Drupal - 18 July 2019 - 5:02am
We love to say that Drupal has modules for absolutely everything. Some modules are simple but still important because they cover specific details in the website’s work. They are like the missing pieces of the puzzle that makes your website more user-friendly, secure, reliable, and so on. One of them is Registration Confirm Email Address, which that we will describe today.
Categories: Drupal

Coriolis: My Favourite Sci-Fi TTRPG

Gnome Stew - 18 July 2019 - 5:00am

For years, I’ve raved endlessly about Coriolis, a science fiction RPG by Fria Ligan (Free League) co-published with Modiphius Entertainment. It’s my favourite science-fiction tabletop roleplaying game of all time. Scratch that. It’s maybe one of my favourites irrespective of genre. There is something in the game for everyone. That’s why I rave about it at any given opportunity. Here’s why.

Choice. Character creation is one of my favourite parts of any tabletop RPG. PbtA playbooks read like branching stories – with your narrative changing directions as you select new moves and abilities. They differ from other styles of tabletop RPG in that playbooks come in different forms for a single game. In D&D, character sheets are not individualistic in structure. You’re led along a linear path of new abilities, with the narrative having little effect on how your character class changes. Meanwhile, Coriolis sits right in the middle. I very much enjoy the wide variety of character “concepts” – Artist, Data Spider, Fugitive, Negotiator, Operative, Pilot, Preacher, Scientist, Ship Worker, Soldier, and Trailblazer – presented to the reader. Now, unlike PbtA character sheets or D&D classes, your initial concept is more like a springboard into a unique creation of your choice. When you begin character creation, the loose concept you pick only has a mechanical bearing on certain skills you are particularly talented with and the strongest attribute you start with. But that’s really where it ends. You can pick any skill. Have any weapon. Be anyone. Like the idea of being a space archaeologist? Let the Scientist guide you in the beginning as you determine who you want your character to be through play. Want to be a corporate bodyguard? Pick the Operative if you want a more low-key background, or a Soldier if you want the military to figure heavily in your backstory.

Structured growth from freeform roleplaying. In many ways, tabletop roleplaying games are like real life. Like us, characters in tabletop RPGs encounter challenges, experience failure and triumph, and experience the world in a unique way. If we’re particularly lucky or insightful, we learn and grow from these experiences. In popular games like Dungeons & Dragons, player characters “grow” by obtaining “experience points” earned from overcoming challenges commonly taking the form of a combat encounter. See the antagonist. Kill said antagonist. Grow in ways unrelated to the mass murder you’ve just committed. In Coriolis, players improve their characters’ quantifiable skills and abilities in a much more self-reflective manner. The game system rewards players “experience points” by facilitating a structured debrief and discussion between players and the GM at the end of every gaming session This is based on the overall narrative actions of each character and not necessarily what they killed or how many challenges they overcame. Some of the questions asked include:

  • Did you participate?
  • Did you overcome a difficult challenge and help your group reach their goals?
  • Did you learn something new about yourself?
  • Did your personal problem(s) put your group at risk?
  • Did you sacrifice or risk something for a member of the group to which you share a close bond?

Especially when playing tabletop RPGs with strangers or family members, systems like D&D and Pathfinder causes players to become preoccupied with “doing things” to level up their characters. Games generally descend into, sessions of “if we kill this many _____, we’ll gain this much experience.” Experience and growth are reduced to the consequences of death. Learning becomes a task. A game like Coriolis can be used to encourage more self-reflective (yet, goal-oriented) roleplay. The structured end-of-session debrief and discussion is a great way to have players recognize the weaknesses and strengths of their characters, mediate their own problems, and identify how their actions and behaviours can positively and negatively affect others.

I do, however, have mixed feelings about the “Arabian Knights in space” description attached to this product. While on one end there are clear undertones of Orientalist themes. But on the other, it presents a fictional Islamic world in a way that doesn’t problematize religion or depicts Muslims unfairly. As someone who’s spent a lot of time living and working in a Muslim country, I can very much appreciate what this game does for fair and positive representation. Perhaps I’ll discuss this in a future post on its own. Needless to say, the freedom to which you are able to create characters, the emphasis on storytelling and complications, and an easy to learn, yet highly tactical combat system makes Coriolis a unique game. It lets you be what you want and do what you want, all while providing a scaling degree of structure. It’s accessible and highly reflexive, and that’s what’s really important when assessing the value of a tabletop RPG.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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