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Acro Media: Acro Media offering $4000 tuition subsidy towards College’s new Certificate

Planet Drupal - 16 November 2017 - 8:32am

As one of North America’s premier users of Drupal we have worked together with Okanagan College to develop a new Drupal Web Developer Certificate that will be offered weekday evenings beginning January 8, 2018.

We are so anxious to find coding talent that we are putting our own money on the line in hopes of addressing our HR recruitment challenges.

“We need great candidates for interesting and exciting CMS work in Kelowna and are looking forward to hiring graduates from this program,” says Shae Inglis, CEO of Acro Media. “In fact, Acro Media is going beyond just supporting the OC program. We are also sponsoring a contest to provide a $4,000 tuition award to a talented student who submits the best code sample before Dec. 15 for the January intake of the course. Contest details are available at www.acromedia.com/contest

“The Drupal Web Developer Certificate will give students the knowledge, practice and experience to find great jobs and careers in the Okanagan. This exciting Okanagan College and industry partnership has resulted in a program that will provide companies with highly qualified and work-ready graduates,” explains Dennis Silvestrone, Okanagan College’s Director of Continuing Studies and Corporate Training.

Taught by industry experts, this 240-hour Certificate will be offered at the Okanagan Innovation Centre in downtown Kelowna Mondays through Thursdays from 4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Students applying for the Drupal Web Developer Certificate are financial aid and student loan eligible.

For more information visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/drupal or call 1-888-638-0058 to learn more about qualifying for this Certificate.

Categories: Drupal

Time Barons Now Available From WizKids

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 November 2017 - 8:00am
Oh, to be able to control time. You’d be able to speed through the week and get to the weekend again. Or go back in time and relive really great moments. Hell, I’d go ahead and schedule up TGN posts for the next decade or two at one time. But if there were other people […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Z-Man Games Posts New Pandemic: Rising Tide Preview

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 November 2017 - 7:00am
Having your country below sea level can possibly cause some issues unless you’ve got a really good levee, lock, and dam system. Well, the Netherlands is below sea level. And they’ve got a pretty good system going for them. But what if those systems start to fail? It’ll take a lot more than just sticking […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Five Weeks in the Wild - Early Access on itch.io - by Martin Nerurkar

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 November 2017 - 6:31am
On the 10th of October I I started the Nowhere Prophet First Access on itch.io (http://itch.nowhereprophet.com). That was just over five weeks ago so I guess it's time for a look at how that went and how I feel about it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Video Game Monetization Strategies - by Chris Cobb

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 November 2017 - 6:30am
The purpose of this article is to provide a lens for understanding and evaluating monetization strategies in games.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Day 38 of 100 Days of VR: Creating a VR First Person Shooter I - by Josh Chang

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 November 2017 - 6:29am
Welcome to Day 38! Today, we’re going to talk about the limitations of mobile VR and make some changes in our game to fix things. We’ve already started to fix some things, specifically adding event triggers to our enemies, but there’s still many to solve
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Swift based iPhone Game Development Process - by Juned Ghanchi

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 November 2017 - 6:28am
Game development for an iPhone has never been so much easy as it is now. All you need to get started is going to the Apple’s App Store, and you get all the resources readily available.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Biome Painter: Populating Massive Worlds - by Krzysztof Narkowicz

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 November 2017 - 6:27am
How to efficiently populate massive game worlds? Certainly, we don’t want to place every tree manually. After all, game development is about making smart trade-offs.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Plaid Hat Posts New Stuffed Fables Preview

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 November 2017 - 6:00am
Every story has a beginning. In this new preview of Stuffed Fables from Plaid Hat Games, we get a look at the first couple pages of the Storybook. So, what is this all about? Where is “base” that we build up from? That’s what you get to see. From the post: Hello, and welcome to […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Change configuration directly on a Drupal 8 production site

Planet Drupal - 16 November 2017 - 5:00am
Managing native configuration with Drupal 8 makes it very easy to make changes or additions to the configuration from a site instance (such as a development environment) to another site instance (the production environment). These configuration exports and imports of a site are made in one piece: that is, the entire configuration of a site, which is updated. Thus if configuration additions have been made to the production site, they will be overwritten at the next import of the configuration if these configurations are not present also on the source environment. But there are valid use cases where certain configurations can and must be modified directly in production. Examples of immediate use are, for example, the creation of new Webform forms, or the creation or update of new Newsletters managed with the SimpleNews module. It is quite legitimate for a webmaster to modify or create new NewsLetters on the production site. It's almost like content, except that ... it's a configuration entity. Let's discover how to manage these particular cases with the module Configuration split, module that will allow us to maintain an organized process to manage the evolution and maintenance of a site in production while allowing the modification of some configurations live.
Categories: Drupal

Dblog Search

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2017 - 4:48am

Allows text search in Dblog messages. Just enable and use, no need to install or configure additional third party components.

Requirements

Core DBlog module enabled.

Usage

Once the module is activated, you can use text search in standard dblog path (admin/reports/dblog).

Module searchs both description and variables of Dblog messages.

Categories: Drupal

Group control for forums

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2017 - 4:36am

Enables group functionality for the forum module.

This is work in progress.

Categories: Drupal

Filter Configurations

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2017 - 3:09am

Adds filtering capability to "admin/config" page.

Description:

The admin/config page doesn't have any option to search for specific configurations.

This module provides a search input in this page so that users can search/filter specific configurations by typing in the input box.

Categories: Drupal

GDPR Consent

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2017 - 2:01am

Module that collects GDPR Data processing consent from logged-in users using the site.

Acquisition can be forced or recommended based on options selected.

Partially forked from Legal module.

Better description incoming.

Categories: Drupal

Mud and Water of Spintires:MudRunner - by Pavel Zagrebelnyy

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 November 2017 - 1:06am
Here we present technical details behind rendering of Mud and Water in Spintires:MudRunner, a driving simulation game, developed by Saber Interactive and published by Focus Home Interactive on Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC (Steam).
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Dropsolid: ngrok: testing payment gateways in Drupal commerce

Planet Drupal - 16 November 2017 - 12:15am
16 Nov Testing payment gateways in Drupal commerce: ngrok to the rescue Marek Drupal 8 Tech

Building commerce websites always means building integrations. Every time we work on project that is aimed at selling something (products, subscriptions, paid access, etc.), we have to choose a payment provider that will take care of our transactions.

Almost every payment provider out there gives us the ability to test their services using some sort of testing or sandbox environment. This is a nice chance to fully test the checkout funnel and avoid stressful situations when deploying the application to a live environment.

While setting up commerce checkout flow locally, you’ll probably run into one (or all) of the following hiccups:

  • Issues with setting up a payments provider account,
  • No ability to parse incoming webhooks,
  • Problems with redirecting your customers back to the website.


The reason is simple: you’re hidden behind your NAT/firewall, so there is no way to reach your website from any remote server. As a workaround, you could probably create a manual payment method (for example bank transfer) and use this to browse all steps of your checkout flow. But you'll have to admit: this won't solve your main problem. Alternatively, you could clone your project to a remote environment, but is this always necessary? There has to be a better way to save time and keep working locally whilst keeping the full ability to test and debug remote services. Let’s have a closer look at how to wrap it all together with Drupal 8, Commerce 2 and a small tool called ngrok. In this example, I will be using the Mollie payments platform - scroll down to find out more! (Additional info about how to use Mollie and Drupal together in this post)

 

Download and set up ngrok

Ngrok is a very simple command line tool that allows you to expose a local web server to the internet. It takes only a few moments to set it up and its variety of configuration options is quite impressive (see the corresponding documentation).
 

Create ngrok account and download library files

Three easy steps:

  1. Simply visit ngrok.io and create a new account: https://dashboard.ngrok.com/user/signup
  2. Download and unpack the ngrok binary: https://ngrok.com/download
  3. Install your authtoken. Your personal account comes with its own token, which is available for reference via this link: https://dashboard.ngrok.com/get-started

When you get your token, locate the ngrok file and run the following command:

# ./ngrok {command} {param_is_a_token_conaining_lot_of_strange_chars_like_3Adacx$$321!} ./ngrok authtoken 5RpgRe8UA4qFWXtZoZb5P_3KeqMMsh6BjYMtWnJpgJt
Tune up your virtual host

Tune up the configuration of virtual host with the website you want to test by adding the server alias. For example, your apache2 vhost, with URL http://ngork.local, should have a *.ngrok.io alias, so you conf file should start like this:

ServerName ngrok.local ServerAlias *.ngrok.local *.ngrok.io Run ngrok

The very basic usage to start a simple HTTP tunnel goes like this:

# ./ngrok {command} {local_hostname}:{port} ./ngrok http ngrok.local:80
  • http command says start an HTTP tunnel
  • local_hostname argument says forward tunnel to this hostname
  • and port argument says listen on that port

After running the command, you will see ngrok up and running:

That should do the trick for now: you should be able to visit your page at URL provided by ngrok. The unfortunate thing about a free account is that every time you start a new tunnel, it creates a new URL. You can visit the ngrok web interface at http://127.0.0.1:4040 to check the status, incoming requests, connections, headers and much more.

 

Set up Commerce 2 / Drupal 8

Our test project needs a basic setup, with the following commerce 2.x modules turned on:

  • Commerce Checkout
  • Commerce Order
  • Commerce Payment
  • Commerce Price
  • Commerce Product
  • Commerce Store
  • Commerce Cart - not really required, but helpful to easily jump through the UI
  • Mollie Payment

Configure basics - set up you default store, product type etc. at the end your checkout flow will contain following panes:

 

Set up a Mollie payment account

Log in to the Mollie dashboard and jump to the Website profiles page, where you can create a profile or edit an existing one. Under contact information, provide the URL that is generated by your running ngrok process. Mollie will use it to send you all the webhooks:

Next, expand the Live end Test API keys pane to find the credentials that you need to configure the payment method in commerce. Install the Mollie Payment module and navigate to the Payment UI ( /admin/commerce/config/payment-gateways). Next, fill out the new payment method form with all the required details:

 

Test it...

That’s it! You can start with testing your payments, add any product to your cart and run through the checkout. After reviewing your order, you will automatically get redirected to the payment page, select any method and submit your transaction. For payment providers where you can define a full return URL and not only the domain - which is not the case with Mollie -, you can add XDEBUG_SESSION_START={YOUR-IDEKEY}, and start a debug session, as if you were working  on a regular local environment.

With ngrok up and running and your Mollie profile properly configured, you will get back to your local website. In the following few minutes, your local project should be receiving a bunch of webhooks. Whilst you wait for them coming in, you can preview your transactions in the Dashboard.

 

Key takeaways

Ngrok is definitely a great time-saver. It provides a lot of useful features and helps to resolve a variety of problems that you’ll often encounter during local development. In this article, I just demonstrated one example of its usage. It’s good to keep in mind that ngrok allows you to do much more:

  • Demoing - with ngrok running on your machine, you can share your local project with your teammates and clients
  • Insecure/mixed content check - with ngrok you can access your project via https:// which allows you to check insecure content warnings (no SSL needed!)   
  • Analysis - using the dashboard that is located at http://localhost:4040, you can inspect all requests/responses
  • Secure connection - you can secure your tunnel with a password  
  • Receiving webhooks - finally, you’re able to receive all webhooks and respond to them
  • Developing headless Drupal applications - while working locally you can expose your endpoints to your teammates ( check our article about Drupal 8 and React )

 

Drupal 8 is a really powerful and API-ready framework. It works very well together with lots of external services. Considering this, in addition to the never-ending technological progress, this flexible situation forces us to leave our self-created comfort zone and “I only use one tool” mentality. There are plenty of options to learn more about and use external tools, APIs and services. This provides a lot of flexibility, but, on the other hand, also requires some adaptation, has a learning curve and requires focus at every single stage of product development.

As developers - who don’t like mistakes, especially when payment integrations and real money are involved - we can’t afford to miss a beat here. Checkout funnels are leads that convert into real sales. They provide crucial business value to our clients and have to be extremely reliable; every payment needs to come through successfully. Testing your payment services through ngrok will allow you to stay in close control of your project, reduce stress and track down any issues before you spin up your application. It doesn’t take much time to set up, but the payoff is tremendous.

 

 

As always, you can discover more Drupal secrets on our blog. Automatic quarterly updates? Subscribe to our newsletter!

Categories: Drupal

Character Class: Looking for Group

RPGNet - 16 November 2017 - 12:00am
Gaming with people you know.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Brussels Calendar

New Drupal Modules - 15 November 2017 - 11:42pm

Based on Event Calendar Widget of Paul Navasard (https://codepen.io/peanav/full/ulkof).

Ones installed, add a Calendar Block and edit settings corresponding your requirements.

Functionalities:

  • Gets data from a view.
  • Can use javascript function as trigger or click to navigate to the node.
  • Only supports timestamp (created, etc.). Could be improved.

"No events" information is using the translation engine ("t()").

What could be added:

Categories: Drupal

Designing ‘Organic’ Difficulty: A Cognitive Neuropsychology Approach (1: Introduction)! - by Ashton Philip Kehnscherper

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 15 November 2017 - 10:27pm
Current difficulty systems often focus on fixed metric manipulation to appease players when it comes to difficulty, but through the use of a different cognitive neuropsychology lens, can a more 'organic' method to game design and difficulty be produced?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Paykings

New Drupal Modules - 15 November 2017 - 7:43pm
Categories: Drupal

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