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“Why Are Manhole Covers Round?” - by Bill Borman

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
If people really think that the most likely answer is that the original designer of the manhole cover made it round because it can't fall in, or it doesn't need to be precisely aligned, or you can roll it for goodness' sake, they're crazy.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Risks of Multi Game Development - by Ulyana Chernyak

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
Thanks to longer development cycles, the strategy of developing multiple games at once is becoming popular. However the inherent risks of game development grows and is the subject of today's post.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Things every trailer should do - by Lena LeRay

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
I write for Gamasutra's sister site IndieGames.com and one thing I write is weekly trailer roundups. A game doesn't need good graphics to have a good trailer, but there are some things every trailer should do.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

One step away from making it big - by Nilanjan Bhowmik

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
When everything seems to go wrong don't lose hope
Categories: Game Theory & Design

We have a winner! - Luck based monetization in f2p mobile games. - by Tim Rachor

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
This article describes some best practises on how to design a luck-based monetization mechanic in free-to-play mobile games.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Video: Indie Dev Interview - James Whitehead of Boss Baddie Games - by Andrew Pallett

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
Interview with Indie Developer James Whitehead of Boss Baddie Games for the Darevolt YouTube series 'VG1K'.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How to create collisions in HTML5 games with WiMi5 - by Jose Maria Martinez

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
The goal of this post is to explain how to create collisions in a HTML5 game. We explain how to use blackboxes and other visual scripting features available in WiMi5. We also explain step by step some examples of different collisions.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Pong Clone - Postmortem - by Sebastian Miko

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 October 2014 - 11:02pm
In my first game a week postmortem on Pong I discuss what went right, what went wrong, and what I learned from my experience. I discuss the importance of a Game Design Doc, creating a sense of Urgency and setting goals.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Web Wash: Add Keyword Highlighting using Search API in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 14 October 2014 - 3:44pm

Search API has been my go-to module for building search pages for the last two years. Even if the client doesn't ask for anything fancy, I still download and install Search API, use Database Search for the index and Views for the page.

If you start with Search API from the beginning, then it's easier to customise later on. The core Search module, on the other hand, is easy to setup but hard to modify.

Recently, I had to create a search page that highlighted the keywords in the results. If you search using a particular keyword, then the word is highlighted.

Categories: Drupal

Robin Hunicke joins UC Santa Cruz's game program as an instructor

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 14 October 2014 - 3:12pm

The Games and Playable Media program picks up the Journey producer and co-author of the influential MDA framework as an Associate Professor of Art & Game Design. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Commerce Guys: DrupalCon Amsterdam Wrap Up

Planet Drupal - 14 October 2014 - 11:22am
Wow!!! As I think about the week spent in Amsterdam, I am in awe of the entire experience. This beautiful place has a very long and eventful history dating back to the 12th century, and was the perfect setting for DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014. As I think back upon the week, so many words come to mind that reflect emotions I felt while there: festivity, jubilance, liveliness, pride and treasure.   Having only been with Commerce Guys for a short 3 months, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I’ve been in the world of technology for over 13 years, and I’ve been around the block more than once with emerging technologies within the word of digital commerce. This experience for me personally will be one that I will forever treasure.     I said on many occasions that I felt like a fish out of water just trying to get some air. I consider myself fairly smart – I realized in Amsterdam with these magnificent people that any hopes of me getting an invite to be part of Mensa International most likely will never happen. Their kindness and willingness to welcome me to the world of Drupal was more than I could ever ask for.   Henry Ford once said, “Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.” The amazing group of people whom I refer to as the “Drupal People” (all 2,370 of them in attendance) embody this quote by Henry Ford. These are some of the most amazing, generous and intellectually aware people I have ever had the experience to associate with.    There was something rare and unique about this group of “Drupal People”. I believe that rareness is their desire to work together for one common goal…it’s what sets them apart from so many others. That goal is to serve the customer, and to provide the best of the best when it comes to a solution that is cost effective, manageable and scalable. From small startup business to full-blown enterprise organization, we have a solution that will work. Whether you are a current Drupal customer or are looking to make a change over to Drupal, I am here to tell you that the “Drupal People” truly are working together in a spirit of togetherness that will make Drupal the platform of the future (if they haven’t already).     I mentioned in the first paragraph some adjectives such as festivity, jubilance, liveliness, treasure and pride. There are two that stand out above all the rest: pride and treasure. I can’t be more proud of the company I have the privilege of working for and the people I have the opportunity to work with. Each and every team member of Commerce Guys brings to work a sense of pride that can’t be explained; only witnessed. Many sleepless hours are spent building the best of the best and ensuring that our customers know only one name: and that name is Drupal, a rare treasure.   I am excited about the next DrupalCons in Bogota, Los Angeles and Barcelona in 2015. As always, Commerce Guys will be there loud and proud supporting Drupal Commerce, Platform.sh, our partners, and the great people who are advocating the vision and future of Drupal.     Cheers to the beautiful city of Amsterdam, the fine people of Amsterdam, and each and every one of you who make what we do possible.   Thanks again for welcoming me to the Drupal Community in Amsterdam, I will be back!!!  
Categories: Drupal

Humble Bundle branches out to a new game platform: your browser

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 14 October 2014 - 11:11am

The folks at Humble have dropped their latest bundle on a new platform: your browser. The organization has partnered with software firm Mozilla, which continues to push browsers as a game platform. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

GDC Next speakers address a few failings of modern game design

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 14 October 2014 - 10:45am

Telltale Games' Caryl Shaw and developer Ara Shirinian will share lessons learned from their time in licensed and free-to-play game development at GDC Next 2014 featuring ADC. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Aten Design Group: Drupal Migrate for Development Content

Planet Drupal - 14 October 2014 - 10:43am

Drupal and many of the people who work with it are moving toward a configuration in code model of site development. One of the advantages of a config in code approach is that the code you add, share, and modify works for all the members of your team and across environments. Instead of everyone syncing databases (or passing around notes on how to update their environment because something changed), everything stays up-to-date with the latest code in your version control system. This essentially provides a known, common state for everyone to work against.

Configuration only gets you part of the picture, though. Modules like Features and configuration initiatives for Drupal 8 separate configuration from content. Configuration is sharable settings; content is the information that site stores/uses. This separation makes sense in organizing your code or site, but leaves a big gap in your ability to build and test a project. If I'm working on a project locally, I can't share a link to the article node I'm having trouble with because it’s a combination of configuration and content that exists only on my local machine.

You need standardized content to test against and to provide a common ground to review variations with your team. But what do you do when you're starting on a project and you don't have content from a client yet? You still need to develop code that uses content and you still need to style the site.

Luckily, we can use a common approach for bringing in content from another source, the Migrate module, to help create content we can share and test against. Additionally, the content can be updated, version controlled, and contributed back as the project rolls forward. And – this is very important for development content – when we're finished with dev content we can remove it with Migrate's rollback functionality. Content created with some modules like Devel Generate and even manually created development content aren’t easily removed when you're finished. At Aten, we commonly had many nodes with "DELETE" in the title to make it "easy" for us to find and remove it later, which is less than ideal.

How does this all work? This is our internal workflow:

  • Create a resources folder in your project. Typically we now have a "root" level that has resources, a public_html folder (which has the Drupal files), and other project files.
  • Inside of the resources, we create a content directory and add content files like YAML files, CSVs, etc. (more on that in a minute)
  • We have started to use gulp and we have a task that will convert the YAML files to JSON.
  • We create a custom module in the project for migrate and add migrate classes for each of the content files we need to import. Typically this will be something like "project_content". For dev specific content, we name the migrations with "Dev" on the end. When we have production content (which is awesome to have early in a project), we leave that suffix off the class name since that content isn't something we need to rollback later.
  • We've created a script that is shared in the project that enables/disables modules, enables and reverts features, runs the migrations, updates various other things related to the project setup. If I add a new migration, I update that script's configuration to include it for others working on the project. I hope to share more about this script soon.
Creating Test Content

Now we need to create the content. Typically this requires some insight provided by our Drupal architecture document, but I have also created a couple of tools to help out with this process which help me stay in code:

The typeinfo commands allow you to inspect content types/entities on the site. For example, if you are going to create content for an Article content type, you would run:

drush typeinfo article

That will output the content type's fields, field types, and some other information. Often this provides a good overview of what pieces you will need to create in your content file. If you have a taxonomy or entity reference field in that content type, you can also get more information about that via another typeinfo command:

drush typeinfo-field field_article_type

This will return a few specifics that may show you the taxonomy that field uses. And now we can use the taxonomyinfo command to list terms in that vocabulary:

drush taxonomyinfo-term-list article_type

We can also extend this functionality to automatically stub some of the content (à la devel-generate) by creating another drush command. This command lets us get the YAML with some data populated for us:

drush stub-content article --include-id --include-title --count=5 > resources/content/article.yaml

An example of this command is here: https://gist.github.com/robballou/a7aa247aa7bdfb3a1b2c

The stub content functionality makes some really rudimentary content and you can expand that with content from your favorite ipsum replacement or other sources.

We can migrate from a variety of sources: from CSV files, JSON files, or even other databases. CSV files are a popular choice because you can collaborate on a spreadsheet (especially via Google sheets) and export that data. JSON is another nice solution because the data can match the destination closely. In some of our projects we have even used YAML and converted that to JSON since the readability of YAML is slightly better than JSON — which means we can have people write content who don't know the ins-and-outs of JSON!

Some systems may have access to a PHP YAML library and it could be used to create a Migrate YAML source class. This would eliminate the need to convert files but may rely on that YAML library to be available on local, staging, and production servers. We've used the node.js/gulp approach because it can be shared between environments and projects that may not have this PHP support built in. Migrating and Removing Test Content

This article won't get into the details of creating your Migrate code, but the next step in the process is creating and testing the code to get this content into Drupal. When this is done, commit this to your version control system to share with others working on the project or with other systems.

As an example, we'll say we created a migration called ArticlesDev which has a handful of articles in it. The content uses a variety of the fields in the content so we can make sure all the functionality works and includes several nodes so we can test lists of various sizes. We can import the content into any system with:

drush migrate-import ArticlesDev

If the article content type changes down the line, you can update the content files and re-run the migration, updating the existing content (or adding new content):

drush migrate-import --update ArticlesDev

Development-specific content may never get imported on shared systems, but if you do want to use that content for client acceptance testing or for any other case, you can easily remove this content with:

drush migrate-rollback ArticlesDev Content in Code

If you're working in a team or if you need a client to review functionality, development content can be very handy. Building on this workflow, you can get a set of content in place early in the process, update it as things change, and get rid of it if you don't need it anymore. Your team and your clients have a common ground when discussing the project. As a bonus, your development migration code can be used as a basis for creating or importing live content as you get it from the client.

Categories: Drupal

Stat

New Drupal Modules - 14 October 2014 - 10:02am
Categories: Drupal

SitePoint PHP Drupal: Quick Tip: Up and Running with Drupal 8 in Under Five Minutes

Planet Drupal - 14 October 2014 - 9:51am

In this quick tip, we’ll be installing a local instance of Drupal 8, beta 1. By the end, you’ll have a copy of Drupal that’s not only ready to be extended with Symfony bundles and other packages, but also ready to accept content and display it to end users.

Step 1: Prepare Environment

Continue reading %Quick Tip: Up and Running with Drupal 8 in Under Five Minutes%

Categories: Drupal

Open Source Training: The Payment Module: A Simpler Alternative to Drupal Commerce

Planet Drupal - 14 October 2014 - 9:45am

Here at OSTraining we've given significant coverage to Drupal Commerce. You can watch a video class with nearly 30 lessons and download a book, "Building E-commerce Sites with Drupal Commerce".

However, Drupal Commerce is an enterprise-quality solution and a good number of OSTraining members have asked for simpler solutions.

For those members, we often recommend the Payment module which makes it easy to add e-commerce fields to your content.

Payment supports about half-a-dozen gateways (PayPal, Stripe, iDEAL, Authorize.net, Ogone, Rabo OmniKassa) and we'll use PayPal in this tutorial.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Doei Doei, DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - 14 October 2014 - 9:04am

This post was originally shared on the Drupal Association blog.

DrupalCon Amsterdam has wrapped up, and now that we're over the jet lag, it's time to look back on one of the most successful DrupalCons to date. DrupalCon Amsterdam was the largest European DrupalCon yet, by far. Just to knock your socks off, here are some numbers:

  • More than 2,300 attendees showed up to 120 sessions and nearly 100 BoFs
  • 115 attendees showed up to the community summit and the business summit
  • 146 training attendees, 400 trivia night attendees, and 400 Friday sprinters made the week a success
  • …and through it all, we ate 1,200 stroopwafels.

The fun extended to more than just the conference -- with 211 transit passes and 56 bike rentals, attendees from over 64 countries were able to enjoy all the city of Amsterdam had to offer. What a success!
As with any DrupalCon, DrupalCon Amsterdam wouldn't have been a success without lots and lots of help from our passionate volunteers. We'd like to take a moment to send out a big THANK YOU to all of our track chairs and summit organizers:

  • Pedro Cambra - Coding and Development
  • Théodore Biadala - Core Conversations
  • Steve Parks - Drupal Business
  • Lewis Nyman and Ruben Teijeiro - Frontend
  • Michael Schmid - Site Building
  • Bastian Widmer - DevOps
  • Cathy Theys, Ruben Teijeiro, Gábor Hojtsy and the Core Mentors - Sprints
  • Adam Hill and Ieva Uzule - Onsite Volunteer Coordinators
  • Baris Wanschers - Social Media
  • Emma Jane Westby - Business Summit
  • Morten Birch and Addison Berry - Community Summit

We also appreciate everything our core mentors did to make DrupalCon Amsterdam a hit — and it’s thanks to lots of hard work from our passionate community members that Drupal 8 is in Beta!
We hope you had as fun and exiting a time in Amsterdam as we did. For those of us who weren’t able to make it, and even for those who were, you can relive the fun on the flickr stream, or catch any number of great sessions on the Drupal Association YouTube channel.  And remember to mark your calendar for DrupalCon Barcelona in September 2015. See you there! Below is Holly Ross' set of slides from the Amsterdam closing session.

DrupalCon Amsterdam Closing Session from DrupalAssociation
Image credit to Pedro Lozano on Flickr.

Categories: Drupal

Drush Queue Handling

New Drupal Modules - 14 October 2014 - 7:34am

This module is a light weight module. It provides an interface to disable the Cron queue execution for each queue. Provide a Drush command to execute all the queue taskes that were disabled for Cron. This is useful for large site if queue taskes are not able to be finished in time. It give a little bit more control over queue task execution.

This module also provide an option to cofigure queue execution time and queue item lease time.

This module was developed by a energetic startup company. All credits goes to Mobiroo.

Categories: Drupal
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