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Game Novels 2: The Gladiator - by Greg Costikyan

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 April 2014 - 11:21pm
The Gladiator posits that games can be a subversive tool to undermine authoritarian societies.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Freelock : Heartbleed - Do you need to do anything?

Planet Drupal - 12 April 2014 - 3:46pm

Everybody is writing about Heartbleed this week. The reason? It probably affects more people than any other vulnerability we've ever seen. If you ever log into any web site, anywhere, your password might be revealed -- and that is just the start. The biggest problem? Nobody really knows if somebody actually used this attack.

HeartbleedE-CommerceSecuritySSLDrupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

5 years of game development education – year 1 continued - by Joey Fladderak

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 April 2014 - 7:56am
Looking back at 5 years of a game development education. In this post I will lead you through my first year and my experiences.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Blog: Just say no to employment tests

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2014 - 4:16pm

"This is not professional. It's exploitation. It's taking food off your table and doing free work for competitors. It's stealing your life. Time. Time you could be spending with people that like you." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Want monetization suggestions for your zombie MMO? Head to Reddit

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2014 - 1:23pm

Sony Online Entertainment president John Smedley took to Reddit yesterday to solicit suggestions as to how Sony should monetize its recently-announced post-apocalyptic MMO game H1Z1. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Zero to Drupal: DrupalCampSTL 2014

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2014 - 11:48am

In just over two weeks, The St. Louis Drupal User's Group will host St. Louis' first ever DrupalCamp. The final sessions were announced last week and it's shaping up to be an awesome experience for a wide variety of folks looking to learn more about Drupal.

As @geerlingguy, myself, and a few other great folks from the STLDUG began discussing the idea of hosting St. Louis' first ever DrupalCamp last year, we decided that we wanted to gear our first camp towards those who were just getting started with Drupal. I've been a part of the STLDUG for several years now and two things have been constant: newcomers looking to learn more about Drupal, and a strong need for Drupal developers in the St. Louis area. What's more is that the community of developers, stakeholders, and hobbyists in this city is nothing short of amazing. Naturally, it only made sense to put together a camp that would allow us to share our experiences and expertise with those wanting to learn.

So if you're in or around the St. Louis area and you're looking to learn more about Drupal, check out the sessions, register today, and I look forward to meeting you on April 26th!

Tags
Categories: Drupal

Palantir: D8FTW: Rolling Out the Welcome Mat

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2014 - 11:28am

At Museums and the Web earlier this month Ken Rickard and I ran a developer training seminar for the still-in-alpha-but-getting-there Drupal 8. It was a small group, which wasn't surprising given the event. One of the most interesting things about it, though, was that there was only one PHP developer in the room.

The most active student in the class was an experienced C# developer. He had never worked with PHP before, and, really, didn't seem like he was going to start any time soon. He was mostly there to get a sense for how to integrate Drupal with his company's product for museums.

Despite that, he was able to follow the material just fine. In fact, the only questions he had were related to PHP itself: Its shared-nothing runtime model, the magic __construct() method name, etc. The actual software engineering parts, the general syntax, dependency injection... all of those were easy. Most notably, when we got to the concept of services he even said aloud "Oh those, yeah, easy."

Here's an experienced developer who has never used PHP before, much less Drupal, and he could follow a code-intensive Drupal 8 training class. Let that sink in.

There's an old adage that once you know one language you can easily pick up another because it's all "just programming". That's not actually true; you can easily pick up another language in a similar family. Jumping between PHP, C#, and Java is fairly easy, but don't expect to jump right into Haskell, Erlang, or ML (or vice versa).

That's why our C# developer was able to follow Drupal 8 so easily. PHP's object-oriented model is, by design, very similar to that in Java, C#, and by extension somewhat to C++. It has its own quirks and flavor, to be sure, as does any language. The basic concepts, though — classes, methods, interfaces, services, domain objects, dependency injection — are fairly easily transferrable between them. The best practices that apply in one language are, generally, at least decent practices in another. The syntax may vary but the underlying principles are closely related and the syntax is generally recognizable.

In the latest TIOBE index of programming language popularity (March 2014 as of this writing), PHP has held fairly steady at a very respectable 6th place for over a decade. That's no mean feat. Look up a little bit higher on that list, though, and notice a few familiar faces: Java sits at 2nd place, C++ at 4th, and C# at 5th.

There are a lot of Java and C# developers out there. The corporate world especially is full of them. That's millions (yes, millions) of developers who may not know PHP, but already know the same underlying concepts behind modern, object-oriented PHP. If they need to learn PHP, they can.

That's millions (yes, millions) of developers who may not know Drupal but if they need to learn it, they can.

Conversely, what do you think happened when we showed our C# developer hooks? He recoiled. Physically.

Magic naming of language syntax is not a common practice in the Java/C++/C#/PHP family of languages. To developers coming in from other family languages hooks and big nested arrays are the least-familiar parts of the code base. Those are, in fact, the hardest to learn for the overwhelming majority of the world that is not already a Drupal developer. That's why there has been considerable effort to try and migrate away from naked data structures to industry standard language techniques: It makes Drupal easier to learn in the long run, as well as the other benefits of common patterns and easier modifiability. Hooks and arrays-of-doom haven't gone away yet, but in the long run their days are numbered.

Drupal 8 won't just be easier to learn for existing PHP developers. It will be easier to learn for existing developers, period.

Categories: Drupal

Verbosity: Migrating multilingual data into Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2014 - 11:19am

First thing, have a D6 site with multilingual things ready to go! This node has a file attached (see end of post) with a copy of D6 with some translated nodes and site information (see settings.php file settings to translate these variables). The file is a drush archive.

D6 "Requirements" at this time:

  • It must have CCK installed (2014-04-11)
  • Recommended to install in the non-English language if you wish to download the translations automatically (this isn't working in the UI yet 2014-04-11). You can also go download the translations manually later.
Setting up D8

Currently we do not work from the main branch as there are significant changes happening in this area of Drupal 8. Some things may be broken. You have been warned! Please test and update issue summaries where appropriate.

  • Clone the IMP migration sandbox and install Drupal 8 https://drupal.org/sandbox/chx/2105305
  • Enable migrate, migrate_drupal, content_translation, configuration_translation, locale/"Interface Translation", language (these last two are installed by default if you did not install in English)
  • Enable English as a language
  • Get the patch so you can bind to a second database in D8 https://drupal.org/node/2181775
  • Create a manifest.yml file in the root
Migration Mappings

Put this file int he root of your D8 site. If you did migrations to D7 with the latest versions of migrate and d2d, this file similar to your migrate.inc file registration array (but in a completely new format).

manifest.yml

# nodes
- d6_user_role
#- d6_user (not working yet - "does not meet requirements" 2014-04-11)
- d6_language_types # Patch needed 2014-04-11 https://drupal.org/node/2225293
- d6_language_negotiation # needs above patch
- d6_language # Patches needed 2014-04-11 https://drupal.org/node/2166875 and https://drupal.org/node/2234623

- d6_filter_format

- d6_node_type
- d6_node_settings # gets story content type
- d6_node:*
- d6_node_body_field

- d6_view_modes

You can find the complete list of migrations at core/modules/migrate_drupal/migrate.config.yml some (like d6_user are not yet working 2014-04-11).

Running the Migration

Then, on the command line, run your manifest file. I used a D6 database with no password because of the bug mentioned above.

drush migrate-manifest mysql://d6@localhost/d6 manifest.yml

You will need the latest Drush if you want support D8! A UI-based workflow is being developed here: https://drupal.org/node/2200379

Rolling Back

This does not exist yet, but if you are familiar with doing this manually in D7 the process is the same:

Use the UI to delete the affected things (in this example, delete your nodes)
Clear the database table that stores the migration info for the specific migration: mysql> delete from migrate_map_d6_node;

Other howtos

Writing D6 to D8 entity migrations - https://groups.drupal.org/node/387488
How to test Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 migrations - https://groups.drupal.org/node/398588
eliza411 - http://dspeak.com/fldc14/dothis.html

More information on Migrate in Core / IMP

You can follow the initiative at groups.drupal.org/imp.

AttachmentSize Drupal 6 drush archive with translated nodes and site information1.72 MB Category: D8MIDrupal 8Drupal ArticlesDrupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Blog: How to get the best our of your external QA team

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2014 - 10:23am

"We had different sorts of clients, ranging from the biggest players to the small indie studios. All of them made common mistakes -- some of which are easily avoided." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Janez Urevc: You should come to DC Alpe-Adria (really!)

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2014 - 8:56am

If you came this far you probably liked this video just as much as I did :). You should really consider coming to Portorož in May to attend DC Alpe-Adria. We will have 2 days of great sessions, BoFs and sprints + 2 more day of extended sprints where we're going to focus on D8 and making it rock!

Portorož is also a great destination for children and families so you could bring your significant others and/or families with you and extend Drupal camp into an unforgettable vacation.

Interested? Of course you are! Find out more at drupalalpeadria.org.

Categories: Drupal

Story in games, what we can learn from other story telling media - by Xing Wang

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 8:33am
The importance of story in games is often controversial, especially in F2P games/GaaS. The decision of adding stories or not to a F2P game often pits designers against Product Managers (PM’s) on the same team and data vs. intuition.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Are Videogames Good or Bad for the World? - by Brandon Perton

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 8:32am
I've read a lot of blogs talking about violence in games, and arguing if video games can make you a racist or a sexist. So I'm arguing my points on these popular topics.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Phase2: An Open Source PartnerShip A Year In The Making

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2014 - 6:52am

It was one year ago that our own Steven Merrill, Director of Engineering at Phase2, found himself at the RedHat Summit, when he stopped in front of the OpenShift booth. OpenShift is an open-source Platform As A Service (PaaS) solution that offers developers a cloud application platform with a choice of programming languages, frameworks and application lifecycle tools to build and run their applications. The platform provides built-in support for Node.js, Ruby, Python, PHP, Perl, and Java, as well as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and MongoDB. Developers can also add their own languages.

Right away Steven was intrigued by OpenShift since it’s the only PaaS that’s open source (OpenShift Origin,) and that also has a Red Hat-supported behind-the-firewall install (OpenShift Enterprise) and a public PaaS (OpenShift Online.) As Phase2’s DevOps luminary and frequent contributor to the Drupal community, Steven quickly acquainted himself with the OpenShift team and started to explore the possibility of spinning up OpenShift environments for Drupal. By the end of RedHat Summit 2013, Steven had laid the groundwork for a Drupal 8 cartridge and had created an updated PHP 5.4 cartridge for OpenShift.

Steven’s introduction to OpenShift at the RedHat Summit ignited excitement about diversifying our deployment optimization services here at Phase2. The possibility of creating quickstart packages for our Drupal distributions on OpenShift was especially attractive to us. Soon after the RedHat Summit, the Drupal 8 quickstart cartridge was committed to OpenShift, allowing developers to quickly and safely spin up a Drupal 8 environment to test and develop on.

Throughout the past year, our relationship with OpenShift strengthened as we worked together at DrupalCon Portland and DrupalCon Prague to develop Drupal compatibility with OpenShift. To our clients’ delight, we began implementing OpenShift into our deployment services. One of our recent clients, a Fortune 500 publishing company, was overjoyed to find that the deployment process we created for them using Openshift allowed them to cut onboarding time for new developers from an entire month to as little as a week.

Steven and Diane Mueller, the OpenShift community manager, recently co-hosted an OpenShift for Drupal training at NYC Camp. The training gave Drupal developers the tools and knowledge they need to quickly develop, host, and scale applications in an open source cloud environment.  Next week we will be once again heading to RedHat Summit, one year later, exhibiting at the summit as an Advanced OpenShift partner.

Our partnership with OpenShift is a classic open source story: equally committed to open source solutions, Phase2 and OpenShift have teamed up to develop mutually beneficial service capabilities for our clients. We look forward to continuing our close relationship with OpenShift and announcing several more exciting developments and collaborative projects launching in the near future. Stay tuned – there are big things coming for Drupal on OpenShift, the cloud, and Phase2’s deployment services.

Categories: Drupal

Blog: OpenFL & Haxe, a bumpy start

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2014 - 5:48am

OpenFL is cool. Haxe is cool. Open source is cool. My impression with Haxe is that, the road is going to be bumpy, but it's still a good technology for developing for both Windows and Flash. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Code Karate: Drupal Site Map Module

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2014 - 5:19am
Episode Number: 143

The Drupal Site Map module can be used to provide you Drupal website visitors with a high level overview of the content on your Drupal 7 site.

Tags: DrupalContribDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal PlanetSEO
Categories: Drupal

All the Boring Bits of Paperwork you have to do as an Indie Developer - by Dan Marshall

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 3:50am
Being an indie dev is brilliant and fun, but there's always dull paperwork to do. Here's what to expect, and how to get it done sharpish.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

LibGDX in Depth series – Entry 03 - by Vijay Kartick Prem Kumar

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 3:22am
Third Entry of LibGDX in Depth series
Categories: Game Theory & Design

11 Murphy’s Laws for Gaming - by Shyamal Dave

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 3:04am
Who doesn’t know about Murphy’s Laws? They have duly played their role in justifying the ‘accidents’ of our lives. Here are 11 such interesting Murphy’s Laws ‘re-designed’ around gaming and the various stages of game development!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Improve Game Purchases: Short Credit Card Forms and One-Click Payment - by Ulyana Chernyak Xsolla

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 2:27am
With one short form to fill out and one-click payment systems activated, it’s no surprise both that both users and developers stand to gain from an easy, saved credit card payment system. Users are saved the time, effort and less interruption.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

alt.ctrl.discuss: Please Don't, Spacedog! is Oculus VR immersion done right - by John Polson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2014 - 2:14am
"Everyone else is doing immersion wrong," says Please Don't, Spacedog! developer KO-OP Mode. They used the Oculus and a MIDI device to put players somewhere new, and it was a big hit at alt.ctrl.GDC last month.
Categories: Game Theory & Design
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