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Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: Optimizing Drupal for SEO

Planet Drupal - 14 September 2018 - 2:00pm

 

Drupal has a bunch of great SEO tools. Here are several tips and suggested modules for fine tuning SEO within Drupal. Easy SEO wins can be achieved through configuring metatags and URLs. Don’t forget to setup an XML sitemap of your site and submit to major search engines. SEO isn’t a once and done effort, make sure to constantly research and update with search trends.

Yes, but is it good for SEO? This is a question we hear all the time when we mention all of the wonderful capabilities of a Drupal site. First off, let's dispel the myth that there is a CMS that automatically does magical SEO and makes all of your pages rank higher in search. If you want good SEO, the most important thing that you can do is write good and unique content that humans actually want to read. The CMS or web software has nothing to do with it. So let's assume that you already have great content and semantically perfect markup, there are tons of other little things that you can do to further boost your content in the eyes of search engines and Drupal is a great tool for implementing them.

Categories: Drupal

Nintendo requires online subscription to purchase Switch NES controller

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 14 September 2018 - 10:43am

Sale of the wireless NES controllers recently announced for the Switch is limited to one per Nintendo account as well. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Migrate JSON Source

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 8:53am

Migration sources for JSON encoded data files.

Sources:
  • JSON Fileset: Files in a directory containing JSON encoded data.
  • JSON File: One file of JSON encoded data containing multiple records. (coming soon)
Drush

Also included is a drush command for exporting entities as JSON. This data can then be saved to files for use as migration source data.

Categories: Drupal

Batch API

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 8:48am

API for easily creating batches.

Categories: Drupal

StateFormBase

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 7:47am

Add a ConfigFormBase-like based on state api

Categories: Drupal

Views Autorefresh D8 port

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 7:25am

This module are a drupal 8 port of Views Autorefresh module, waiting opening a Drupal 8 branch on it.

Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs Toolbar

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 7:19am

This module creates a new toolbar that lists paragraph types alphabetically. This is helpful for large sites with many paragraph types to easily access the subpages of the paragraph type, such as the "Manage fields" or "Mange display" local tasks for a particular paragraph type.

Categories: Drupal

How video game localization works and how much it costs in 2018 - by Nikolay Bondarenko

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 September 2018 - 6:46am
What is localization? How about right processes and costs? Which tools work well and which languages we should translate to? All in all, how good your game will perform on foreign markets depends on what approach you choose and how much you spend on ...
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Part 1, Narrative bridging on testing an experience - beyond structures and templates - by Katarina Gyllenback

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 September 2018 - 6:40am
What it means to have a cognitive approach to the narrative and how to approach a quality assurance from a narrative perspective beyond templates and strong structures in creation of engagement in digital and interactive contexts.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Bloom's Taxonomy of Game Reviews - by Michael Heron

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 14 September 2018 - 6:32am
Reviews often spend too much time describing and not a lot of time analysing. This is a discussion of how the use of Bloom's Taxonomy can help address this by systemizing the act of reviewing.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Testing The Float Test: Comparison VS Chi-Square

Gnome Stew - 14 September 2018 - 5:30am

Recently I came across another video featuring the float test for testing die fairness. For those not familiar, the float test consists of floating your dice in a dense bath of salt water and repeatedly spinning, rolling, or shaking them and letting them settle to see if a certain face or set of faces routinely float to the top. This result is supposed to be indicative of voids or differences in density of your dice and proof that they do not roll fairly. In theory, if a die fails the float test you shouldn’t use it.

I’ve always been skeptical of the float test though. Yes, it certainly can tell you if your dice have imperfections that make one face or collection of faces lighter or heavier than others, but do those differences really result in a meaningful difference in rolls? So, I set out to do a not at all repeatable, not at all scientific test to see if the results from a float test on my d20s, were borne out by a chi-square analysis.

Rough Methodology:

  • I wanted to test all my d20s, but I discarded three of them for the purposes of the test: two which had insufficient contrast to read easily, and one that is an old-school double d10, not a true d20
  • I was left with 22 d20s. I wanted to perform a float test on all of them and note which ones failed and which face(s) repeatedly floated to the top.
  • Then I wanted to perform a chi-square goodness of fit test on those dice. However, since we had a clue which face(s) should be the most (or least) common according to the float test, we should actually be able to do a better test that the standard 19 degree of freedom test vs H0: all faces have a .05 chance of occurrence. Instead we would be able to do the better test against H0: the face(s) indicated by the float test have a chance of occurrence equal to .05 times the number of faces. This test is better since we’re able to target the specific faces that should be off rather than general deviation from the ideal distribution.

Execution:

I started with 3 cups of water in a small bowl, enough to contain all my d20s at once. I then started adding salt to the bowl, one tablespoon at a time with the goal of getting all my dice to float. One of the dice started to float after I added about 3 tablespoons of salt (about a 1/16 concentration) but the rest stubbornly refused to float as I added tablespoon after tablespoon of salt. Eventually around 10 tablespoons of salt (about a 1/5 concentration), another die started to float, but the salt also stopped dissolving in the water with 20 of my dice still sitting solidly on the bottom of the bowl. I fished out all of the dice and microwaved the solution and was able to get another few tablespoons of salt to dissolve but no additional dice were floating. So, after a quick google search to make sure I wasn’t about to ruin my dice, I transferred the entire solution to a pan (featured above) and slowly heated it on the stove with a few of the stubborn dice on the bottom so I’d know when I had enough salt dissolved. I managed to get about 16 total tablespoons of salt to dissolve (about a 1 to 3 ratio, making my solution literally saltier than Poseidon’s trident) before two things happened:

  1. The salt stopped dissolving yet again.
  2. Impurities and seeding crystals into the solution (via adding salt) caused a rapid crystallization of the salt out of the solution into a thick crust on the top of the pan which broke loose and sunk.

So, I had gotten about as much salt into the water as I was going to be able to in my kitchen. But even after much of the salt crystallized out of the solution, I was able to float four dice (the four pictured above). That’s not a good result out of 22, but it’s something at least. One of them was very recognizable: my PolyHero Wizard die. The other three are generic d20s. If it’s important, the black one pictured above was the first one to float, the Wizard d20 was the second one to float, but may well have floated better because of its unique textured shape. The two translucent greens were the last to float.

Now that I had four floating dice, I was able to do a float test. The black d20 exclusively had the 16,19,6,9, and 3 cluster at the surface, the Wizard die exclusively had the 20 rise to the surface, and the other two had no discernible tendency. If the float test actually works to detect internal voids and bubbles though, the results of the green dice would make sense, as they are clear enough to visibly confirm that none exist. This gave me two dice to run chi-square goodness of fit test on, but I had already run a general 19 degree of freedom goodness of fit test on my PolyHero Wizard d20, so I was even more skeptical that I would find anything amiss with it. Still, for the sake of being thorough, I went ahead and tested it again.

Remember, that the end result of a chi-square goodness of fit test is a p-value and “if the p is low, H0 must go” i.e.: if your p-value is lower than a standard critical value (usually .1, .05 or .01 depending on how skeptical you want to be) you must reject your original hypothesis. Remember also, in this case our hypothesis is that the faces indicated by the float test came up a proportion of the time equal to .05 times the number of indicated faces (i.e.: the die follows the normal fair distribution). For each, I rolled the die 100 times and ran a one degree of freedom goodness of fit test on the two categories of “float test faces” and “other faces”.

For the wizard die, which had exclusively had the 20 rise to the surface, if it was a fair die we would expect 5 20s to be rolled and 95 other faces. Instead we saw 4 20s and 96 other faces. This results in a p-value for a chi-square goodness of fit with 2 categories (1 degree of freedom) of about .35. This is not sufficiently low to reject our H0, so we do not have sufficient evidence to conclude that the results of the float test are meaningful. As I stated earlier, this isn’t surprising, as I had already run a standard goodness of fit test on this particular die and not found sufficient evidence to reject it’s fairness.

For the black die, which had exclusively had the 16,19,6,9,3 cluster of sides rise to the surface, if it was a fair die we would expect those 5 sides to be rolled 25 times, and the other 15 sides to be rolled 75 times. Instead we saw 26 and 74 occurrences respectively. This resulted in a p-value of about .18. This is lower than the results of the wizard die, but still not sufficiently low to reject our H0. Thus we don’t have sufficient evidence to conclude the float test results are meaningful in this case either.

End Conclusion:

Honestly, this debacle is inconclusive. I couldn’t even get 18 of my 22 dice to float. Either better conditions, a better method of making the solution or a denser solution is required for me to test more dice.  If anyone has suggestions of how to improve my results here, I’d love to hear them. I’m willing to give this another go with more dice. Reading sources online I also find that others have seen the same results I have with dice floating at wildly different densities of solution. It’s possible that this is related to the presence of bubbles and voids and more prominent ones make for denser dice. It’s also possible this relates to particular type of material used in manufacture.

However, given the difficulty in successfully executing a float test, and the proportion of my dice that resolutely refused to float, and the fact that in the two cases we could test, we found no evidence to support the conclusions of the float test, I’m going to tentatively call the float test as impractical and not supportable, but would be very interested in running more tests once I have a better protocol to work with.

Have you had better success with the float test? Swear by it? Have you conducted this or a similar experiment yourself? I’d love to hear from you so I can get tips for another go at this.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Amazee Labs: Drupal Europe: Day four Highlights

Planet Drupal - 14 September 2018 - 4:25am
Drupal Europe: Day four Highlights

Vijay tells us about the fourth day's highlights in Darmstadt, Germany.

Vijay Dubb Fri, 09/14/2018 - 13:25 Keynote

The 4th day of Drupal Europe began with a discussion by a panel made up of Dries Buytaert, Barb Palser, Heather Burns, Hurley Mautic, and Timothy Lehnen, about the future of the open web and open source. Some interesting points were made, especially how we have the responsibility of making open source better, and how we can better protect the four software freedoms principles.

Decoupled Drupal: Implications, risks and changes from a business perspective

Next up was our very own Michael, who gave a presentation on Decoupled Drupal. Some interesting points were made in this presentation. As a developer I love the fact we can experiment with technology, however, I never really gave a second thought about how this can have an impact, both for the company and potential clients. Decoupling for sure has success and failures that we all are going to experience. For example, time to train the team to be up to date with the latest technology and with this come cost. In the end, however, it is an investment. One clear message from this presentation that I took was we should expect failure, and we should not get discouraged by it, but rather learn from it. We should also celebrate the success.

JavaScript Modernisation Initiative

The third presentation I went to was the JavaScript Modernisation Initiative, presented by Lauri Eskola, Matthew Grill, Cristina Chumillas, Daniel Wehner, and Sally Young. As a contributor to this initiative, it was great to hear how this idea came about as this was something I didn't really know. I came to learn that it all began at DrupalCon Vienna, where the idea of how to create a decoupled backend, with a redesigned, and modern administration experience in Drupal came up. As of now, the product is clearly in the prototype stage, with plans to remove the current implementation of Material UI and update using the design created by Christina, which is in the early stages of concept. If you would like to get involved in this initiative, you can find out more on the Drupal website.

Improving the Editor Experience: Paragraphs FTW

After lunch, it was time for Stew to give his second presentation of the week, this time on his own. His presentation was all about paragraphs, a beginners overview of using paragraphs to make the editors experience more fun. Stew went on to explain how to give more control over content layout, and the pros and cons of some of the contrib modules that support paragraphs. Even though this presentation was about Paragraphs, Stew did mention that there were other alternatives to this great module. Way to go Stew, two presentations in one week.

Decoupling Drupal with GraphQL & Twig

The final presentation I attended was by Philipp. He explained what GraphQL is and what it is not, and how much more it can do, such as Search API indexing, and feed Twig templates. One exciting part of this session was the reuse of fragments, meaning you can write one query and reuse it across many templates. It is clear to see why GraphQL is very popular, however, one interesting point that was brought up was that it isn't the same as injecting SQL into Twig. Phillip responded by saying a GraphQL query is not something that is executed, it is a definition of requirements, which you request from the implemented backend. Phillip also thanked Sebastian Siemssen, who happens to be both a core maintainer of the GraphQL module and an ex amazee.

Closing

After the conference, we headed back to the hostel to refresh and then headed out to eat for our final night in Darmstadt. After that we headed back to the venue for trivia night, this was my first time at trivia night, and it was full of fun, great people, atmosphere, food and drink, and great questions. After six rounds of questions, lots of laughter, and a small hiccup with their Google doc, the scores were tallied, and team 16 had won first prize, of which included Stew and Mostfa.

You could also say that Day 4 was pretty “Amazee-ing” with lots happening with our team. Congratulations to all from everyone at Amazee, both at the conference and those left behind.

I would also personally like to thank the Drupal Association for giving me a diversity ticket without which I would not have been able to attend this great conference and have a week of both excellent presentations and being able to continue to contribute to great initiatives.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: We made Drupal a lot easier to evaluate

Planet Drupal - 14 September 2018 - 3:57am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Seven months ago, Matthew Grasmick published an article describing how hard it is to install Drupal. His article included the following measurements for creating a new application on his local machine, across four different PHP frameworks:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 20+ 15:00+ Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

The results from Matthew's blog were clear: Drupal is too hard to install. It required more than 15 minutes and 20 clicks to create a simple site.

Seeing these results prompted me to launch a number of initiatives to improve the evaluator experience at DrupalCon Nashville. Here is the slide from my DrupalCon Nashville presentation:

A lot has happened between then and now:

  • We improved the download page to improve the discovery experience on drupal.org
  • We added an Evaluator Guide to Drupal.org
  • We added a quick-start command to Drupal 8.6
  • We added the Umami demo profile to Drupal 8.6
  • We started working on a more modern administration experience (in progress)

You can see the result of that work in this video:

Thanks to this progress, here is the updated table:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 3 1:27 Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

Drupal now requires the least time and is tied for least clicks! You can now install Drupal in less than two minutes. Moreover, the Drupal site that gets created isn't an "empty canvas" anymore; it's a beautifully designed and fully functional application with demo content.

Copy-paste the following commands in a terminal window if you want to try it yourself:

mkdir drupal && cd drupal && curl -sSL https://www.drupal.org/download-latest/tar.gz | tar -xz --strip-components=1 php core/scripts/drupal quick-start demo_umami

For more detailed information on how we achieved these improvements, read Matthew's latest blog post: The New Drupal Evaluator Experience, by the numbers.

A big thank you to Matthew Grasmick (Acquia) for spearheading this initiative!

Categories: Drupal

Group Media

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 2:03am

This module is designed to associate group specific media elements with a group when using the Group module.

Categories: Drupal

Block Ipaddress

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 12:46am

This module helps to create Ip Address specific Blocks. It Add IP Address setting to block and manages IP Address specific display of block.

Block will be only visible for the selected IP Addresses. It detects and gets User's IP Address information and based on this it manages block visibility.

Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs Collapsible

New Drupal Modules - 14 September 2018 - 12:43am
Collapsible plugin for paragraphs widget for Drupal 8

Improves the Paragraphs widget by applying CSS tweaks and collapsible feature

Install

Option1: Add the module using git modules:

git submodule add git@github.com:AmazeeLabs/paragraphs_collapsible.git \ modules/custom/paragraphs_collapsible/

Option 2: Require the module via composer :
composer require drupal/paragraphs_collapsible

Enable it:

Categories: Drupal

We made Drupal a lot easier to evaluate

Dries Buytaert - 13 September 2018 - 11:44pm

Seven months ago, Matthew Grasmick published an article describing how hard it is to install Drupal. His article included the following measurements for creating a new application on his local machine, across four different PHP frameworks:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 20+ 15:00+ Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

The results from Matthew's blog were clear: Drupal is too hard to install. It required more than 15 minutes and 20 clicks to create a simple site.




Seeing these results prompted me to launch a number of initiatives to improve the evaluator experience at DrupalCon Nashville. Here is the slide from my DrupalCon Nashville presentation:

A lot has happened between then and now:

  • We improved the download page to improve the discovery experience on drupal.org
  • We added an Evaluator Guide to Drupal.org
  • We added a quick-start command to Drupal 8.6
  • We added the Umami demo profile to Drupal 8.6
  • We started working on a more modern administration experience (in progress)

You can see the result of that work in this video:




Thanks to this progress, here is the updated table:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 3 1:27 Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

Drupal now requires the least time and is tied for least clicks! You can now install Drupal in less than two minutes. Moreover, the Drupal site that gets created isn't an "empty canvas" anymore; it's a beautifully designed and fully functional application with demo content.

Copy-paste the following commands in a terminal window if you want to try it yourself:

mkdir drupal && cd drupal && curl -sSL https://www.drupal.org/download-latest/tar.gz | tar -xz --strip-components=1 php core/scripts/drupal quick-start demo_umami

For more detailed information on how we achieved these improvements, read Matthew's latest blog post: The New Drupal Evaluator Experience, by the numbers.

A big thank you to Matthew Grasmick (Acquia) for spearheading this initiative!

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: We made Drupal a lot easier to evaluate

Planet Drupal - 13 September 2018 - 11:44pm

Seven months ago, Matthew Grasmick published an article describing how hard it is to install Drupal. His article included the following measurements for creating a new application on his local machine, across four different PHP frameworks:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 20+ 15:00+ Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

The results from Matthew's blog were clear: Drupal is too hard to install. It required more than 15 minutes and 20 clicks to create a simple site.




Seeing these results prompted me to launch a number of initiatives to improve the evaluator experience at DrupalCon Nashville. Here is the slide from my DrupalCon Nashville presentation:

A lot has happened between then and now:

  • We improved the download page to improve the discovery experience on drupal.org
  • We added an Evaluator Guide to Drupal.org
  • We added a quick-start command to Drupal 8.6
  • We added the Umami demo profile to Drupal 8.6
  • We started working on a more modern administration experience (in progress)

You can see the result of that work in this video:




Thanks to this progress, here is the updated table:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 3 1:27 Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

Drupal now requires the least time and is tied for least clicks! You can now install Drupal in less than two minutes. Moreover, the Drupal site that gets created isn't an "empty canvas" anymore; it's a beautifully designed and fully functional application with demo content.

Copy-paste the following commands in a terminal window if you want to try it yourself:

mkdir drupal && cd drupal && curl -sSL https://www.drupal.org/download-latest/tar.gz | tar -xz --strip-components=1 php core/scripts/drupal quick-start demo_umami />

For more detailed information on how we achieved these improvements, read Matthew's latest blog post: The New Drupal Evaluator Experience, by the numbers.

A big thank you to Matthew Grasmick (Acquia) for spearheading this initiative!

Categories: Drupal

Context Breadcrumb

New Drupal Modules - 13 September 2018 - 10:48pm

INTRODUCTION
------------

Integration Breadcrumb module with Context. This module allow dynamic
define custom breadcrumb for Drupal site.

REQUIREMENTS
------------

This module requires modules:
* Context: https://www.drupal.org/project/context
* Token: https://www.drupal.org/project/token

RECOMMENDED MODULES
-------------------

Categories: Drupal

Take-Two CEO: U.S. gov't needs to take a stand on China's game trade

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 13 September 2018 - 5:09pm

"Our government actually does need to take a position with regard to our trade with China," Zelnick said this week. "China has been stealing our intellectual property for a really long time. Those things just have to change." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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