Skip to Content

Newsfeeds

GD Infinite Scroll

New Drupal Modules - 27 August 2014 - 6:35pm
Overview

Provide an administration to use the infinite scroll jQuery plugin : auto-pager on custom pages using drupal pager.

Features

- Create settings by page, you can use it with every list that use the default theme pager.
- Test on your local environment and deploy your settings with features when your ready.
- You can use pattern in URL to active similar settings on multiple page. (like category/*)

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Workflow for Rescuing (really bad) Drupal Installs with SQL

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 1:54pm
A strategy for building queries with Inline Views
Categories: Drupal

Drupal @ Penn State: ELMSLN optimization: Cost and Scale

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 1:40pm

I did a post the other day about ELMSLN Performance Optimization all about lessons learned and looking at some popular techniques and applying them. These are techniques that can be applied to ANY Drupal (and in many cases non Drupal) application to increase performance. This article looks at the real world price of performance tuning.

Categories: Drupal

Field Formatter

New Drupal Modules - 27 August 2014 - 1:30pm

Adds a formatter for entity reference fields to output only a specific field or field value using a specific formatter.

Categories: Drupal

A better runtime for component-based web applications

Dries Buytaert - 27 August 2014 - 12:53pm
Topic: DrupalWordpressSoftware development

I have an idea but currently don't have the time or resources to work on it. So I'm sharing the idea here, hoping we can at least discuss it, and maybe someone will even feel inspired to take it on.

The idea is based on two predictions. First, I'm convinced that the future of web sites or web applications is component-based platforms (e.g. Drupal modules, WordPress plugins, etc). Second, I believe that the best way to deploy and use web sites or web applications is through a SaaS hosting environment (e.g. WordPress.com, DrupalGardens, SalesForce's Force.com platform, DemandWare's SaaS platform, etc). Specifically, I believe that in the big picture on-premise software is a "transitional state". It may take another 15 years, but on-premise software will become the exception rather than the standard. Combined, these two predictions present a future where we have component-based platforms running in SaaS environments.

To get the idea, imagine a WordPress.com, SquareSpace, Wix or DrupalGardens where you can install every module/plugin available, including your own custom modules/plugins, instead of being limited to those modules/plugins manually approved by their vendors. This is a big deal because one of the biggest challenges with running web sites or web applications is that almost every user wants to extend or customize the application beyond what is provided out of the box.

Web applications have to be (1) manageable, (2) extensible, (3) customizable and (4) robust. The problem is that we don't have a programming language or an execution runtime that is able to meet all four of these requirements in the context of building and running dynamic component-based applications.

Neither PHP, JavaScript, Ruby, Go or Java allow us to build truly robust applications as the runtimes don't provide proper resource isolation. Often all the components (i.e. Drupal modules, WordPress plugins) run in the same memory space. In the Java world you have Enterprise Java Beans or OSGi which add some level of isolation and management, but it still doesn't provide full component-level isolation or component-level fault containment. As a result, it is required that one component pretty much trusts the other components installed on the system. This means that usually one malfunctioning component can corrupt the other component's data or functional logic, or that one component can harm the performance of the entire platform. In other words, you have to review, certify and test components before installing them on your platform. As a result, most SaaS vendors won't let you install untrusted or custom components.

What we really need here is an execution runtime that allows you to install untrusted components and guarantee application robustness at the same time. Such technology would be a total game-changer as we could build unlimited customizable SaaS platforms that leverage the power of community innovation. You'd be able to install any Drupal module on DrupalGardens, any plugin on WordPress.com or custom code on Squarespace or Wix. It would fundamentally disrupt the entire industry and would help us achieve the assembled web dream.

I've been giving this some thought, and what I think we need is the ability to handle each HTTP request in a micro-kernel-like environment where each software component (i.e. Drupal module, WordPress plugin) runs in its own isolated process or environment and communicates with the other components through a form of inter-process communication (i.e. think remote procedure calls or web service calls). It is a lot harder to implement than it sounds as the inter-process communication could add huge overhead (e.g. we might need fast or clever ways to safely share data between isolated components without having to copy or transfer a lot of data around). Alternatively, virtualization technology like Docker might help us move in this direction as well. Their goal of a lightweight container is a step towards micro-services but it is likely to have more communication overhead. In both scenarios, Drupal would look a lot like a collection of micro web services (Drupal 10 anyone?).

Once we have such a runtime, we can implement and enforce governance and security policies for each component (e.g. limit its memory usage, limit its I/O, security permission, but also control access to the underlying platform like the database). We'd have real component-based isolation along with platform-level governance: (1) manageable, (2) extensible, (3) customizable and (4) robust.

Food for thought and discussion?

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: A better runtime for component-based web applications

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 12:53pm
Topic: DrupalWordpressSoftware development

I have an idea but currently don't have the time or resources to work on it. So I'm sharing the idea here, hoping we can at least discuss it, and maybe someone will even feel inspired to take it on.

The idea is based on two predictions. First, I'm convinced that the future of web sites or web applications is component-based platforms (e.g. Drupal modules, WordPress plugins, etc). Second, I believe that the best way to deploy and use web sites or web applications is through a SaaS hosting environment (e.g. WordPress.com, DrupalGardens, SalesForce's Force.com platform, DemandWare's SaaS platform, etc). Specifically, I believe that in the big picture on-premise software is a "transitional state". It may take another 15 years, but on-premise software will become the exception rather than the standard. Combined, these two predictions present a future where we have component-based platforms running in SaaS environments.

To get the idea, imagine a WordPress.com, SquareSpace, Wix or DrupalGardens where you can install every module/plugin available, including your own custom modules/plugins, instead of being limited to those modules/plugins manually approved by their vendors. This is a big deal because one of the biggest challenges with running web sites or web applications is that almost every user wants to extend or customize the application beyond what is provided out of the box.

Web applications have to be (1) manageable, (2) extensible, (3) customizable and (4) robust. The problem is that we don't have a programming language or an execution runtime that is able to meet all four of these requirements in the context of building and running dynamic component-based applications.

Neither PHP, JavaScript, Ruby, Go or Java allow us to build truly robust applications as the runtimes don't provide proper resource isolation. Often all the components (i.e. Drupal modules, WordPress plugins) run in the same memory space. In the Java world you have Enterprise Java Beans or OSGi which add some level of isolation and management, but it still doesn't provide full component-level isolation or component-level fault containment. As a result, it is required that one component pretty much trusts the other components installed on the system. This means that usually one malfunctioning component can corrupt the other component's data or functional logic, or that one component can harm the performance of the entire platform. In other words, you have to review, certify and test components before installing them on your platform. As a result, most SaaS vendors won't let you install untrusted or custom components.

What we really need here is an execution runtime that allows you to install untrusted components and guarantee application robustness at the same time. Such technology would be a total game-changer as we could build unlimited customizable SaaS platforms that leverage the power of community innovation. You'd be able to install any Drupal module on DrupalGardens, any plugin on WordPress.com or custom code on Squarespace or Wix. It would fundamentally disrupt the entire industry and would help us achieve the assembled web dream.

I've been giving this some thought, and what I think we need is the ability to handle each HTTP request in a micro-kernel-like environment where each software component (i.e. Drupal module, WordPress plugin) runs in its own isolated process or environment and communicates with the other components through a form of inter-process communication (i.e. think remote procedure calls or web service calls). It is a lot harder to implement than it sounds as the inter-process communication could add huge overhead (e.g. we might need fast or clever ways to safely share data between isolated components without having to copy or transfer a lot of data around). Alternatively, virtualization technology like Docker might help us move in this direction as well. Their goal of a lightweight container is a step towards micro-services but it is likely to have more communication overhead. In both scenarios, Drupal would look a lot like a collection of micro web services (Drupal 10 anyone?).

Once we have such a runtime, we can implement and enforce governance and security policies for each component (e.g. limit its memory usage, limit its I/O, security permission, but also control access to the underlying platform like the database). We'd have real component-based isolation along with platform-level governance: (1) manageable, (2) extensible, (3) customizable and (4) robust.

Food for thought and discussion?

Categories: Drupal

Video: A Lucasfilm Games postmortem, told by those who lived it

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 27 August 2014 - 12:35pm

This GDC 2014 postmortem featuring six of Lucasfilm Games' earliest employees asks the questions: "What mix of creative and business forces shaped this studio?" and "Could it be duplicated today?" ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Wage gauge: Industry salary stats from the 2014 Game Career Guide

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 27 August 2014 - 12:02pm

In this edition you'll find lots of great data aimed at preparing you for a career in game development, including the results of Gamasutra's most recent industry-wide salary survey. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Lullabot: Communication for Distributed Teams

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 10:00am

With the birth of the internet, and especially since the early days of open source projects (meaning before the term "open source" was used to describe them), developers have been working together on specific projects as distributed teams of people. In some cases they formed passionate communities, all devoted to a piece of software. Years ago, one of Drupal's taglines was actually "Come for the software, stay for the community." Odd, right?

Categories: Drupal

Reminder: GDC 2015 call for submissions closes tomorrow!

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 27 August 2014 - 9:16am

The call for proposals for Main Conference talks, roundtables and panel sessions for the 2015 Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, CA ends tomorrow (8/28). Don't miss the deadline! ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Appnovation Technologies: 3 New Drupal Modules Every Company Should Try

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 7:35am

Here are the three Drupal modules that I think everyone should give it a try:

 

var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
Categories: Drupal

Zivtech: Web Accessibility and Drupal

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 7:01am
Web Accessibility and Drupal

With the advent of screen readers, many web users imagined web accessibility to be complete, but there is more to using the web than simply browsing. Whether users require audio assistance in the form of subtitles or visual assistance in the form of screen readers, it is the responsibility of developers and designers to make accessibility integration a key component of their work, thus allowing all users to have the best experience possible.

In this post, we will attempt to gather accessibility information when working with Drupal. While there is a variety of content available on the web, it is important to see how Drupal specifically allows accessibility integration through its many features.

The following is an excerpt from Web AIM's Introduction to Web Accessibility page http://webaim.org/intro/ that neatly outlines some basic accessibility principles.

What is Web Accessibility?

As defined by http://www.w3.org/:

"Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can use the Web. More specifically, Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, and that they can contribute to the Web. Web accessibility also benefits others, including older people with changing abilities due to aging. Web accessibility encompasses all disabilities that affect access to the Web, including visual, auditory, physical, speech, cognitive, and neurological disabilities. Web accessibility is an aspect of corporate social responsibility. Another important consideration for organizations is that Web accessibility is required by laws and policies in some cases."

Principles of Accessible Design

Below you will find a list of some key principles of accessible design. Most accessibility principles can be implemented very easily and will not impact the overall "look and feel" of your web site.

Provide appropriate alternative text

Alternative text provides a textual alternative to non-text content in web pages. It is especially helpful for people who are blind and rely on a screen reader to have the content of the website read to them.

Provide appropriate document structure

Headings, lists, and other structural elements provide meaning and structure to web pages. They can also facilitate keyboard navigation within the page.

Provide headers for data tables

Tables are used online for layouts and to organize data. Tables that are used to organize tabular data should have appropriate table headers (the element). Data cells should be associated with their appropriate headers, making it easier for screen reader users to navigate and understand the data table.

Ensure users can complete and submit all forms

Ensure that every form element (text field, checkbox, dropdown list, etc.) has a label and make sure that label is associated to the correct form element using the <label> element. Also make sure the user can submit the form and recover from any errors, such as the failure to fill in all required fields.

Ensure links make sense out of context

Every link should make sense if the link text is read by itself. Screen reader users may choose to read only the links on a web page. Certain phrases like "click here" and "more" must be avoided.

Caption and/or provide transcripts for media

Videos and live audio must have captions and a transcript. With archived audio, a transcription may be sufficient.

Ensure accessibility of non-HTML content, including PDF files, Microsoft Word documents, PowerPoint presentations and Adobe Flash content.

In addition to all of the other principles listed here, PDF documents and other non-HTML content must be as accessible as possible. If you cannot make it accessible, consider using HTML instead or, at the very least, provide an accessible alternative. PDF documents should also include a series of tags to make it more accessible. A tagged PDF file looks the same, but it is almost always more accessible to a person using a screen reader.

Allow users to skip repetitive elements on the page

You should provide a method that allows users to skip navigation or other elements that repeat on every page. This is usually accomplished by providing a "Skip to Main Content," or "Skip Navigation" link at the top of the page which jumps to the main content of the page.

Do not rely on color alone to convey meaning

The use of color can enhance comprehension, but do not use color alone to convey information. That information may not be available to a person who is colorblind and will be unavailable to screen reader users.

Make sure content is clearly written and easy to read

There are many ways to make your content easier to understand. Write clearly, use clear fonts, and use headings and lists appropriately.

Make JavaScript accessible

Ensure that JavaScript event handlers are device independent (e.g., they do not require the use of a mouse) and make sure that your page does not rely on JavaScript to function.

Design to Standards

HTML compliant and accessible pages are more robust and provide better search engine optimization. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) allow you to separate content from presentation. This provides more flexibility and accessibility of your content.

How Does Drupal Support Accessible Design?

Drupal supports web accessibility standards in a number of ways, both through contributed modules and in core. In fact, the Drupal community has made accessibility for visitors, developers, and community members an explicit priority for the Drupal platform, as discussed on Drupal.org. A contributor ensures they have adhered to accessibility standards while developing their modules by appending the D8AX tag https://groups.drupal.org/node/66323 to their project page.This survey shows the importance of such practices as well as providing insightful data from disabled users.

The author of Zen, a Drupal start theme, wrote : “Zen was also one of the first themes to make the D7 Accessibility Pledge. And we stand behind it! #D7AX/#DAX - I pledge to make this theme as accessible as it can be.”

At Zivtech, so do we.

Here we use Bear Skin, which is a starter theme based on Zen. Zen pioneered the navigation “skip link” now found in Drupal 7 core, and it now includes a full compliment of ARIA roles and Sass mixins for the element-invisible (hidden, but accessible) styling.

It is our mission at Zivtech to provide the best, most accessible web experiences to our clients and their customers. Here are ways that you too, can help ensure accessibility is at the forefront of your projects as well.

Tips and Resources General Site Building
  • Source Order
  • tags for images (possibility to tokenize these tags)
  • ARIA Tags (Check ARIA roles - view w3c page - other known as page landmarks)
  • Accessibility tools and best practices for site builders
  • https://drupal.org/node/394094
Theming JS
  • onSubmit, not onClick
  • Focus instead of Hover for functions
Resources Helpful Modules

(Some of these modules are still in development versions, but are relevant to be listed here as production ready versions are in the work)

  • A11y Titles - This module allows site builders to visually hide titles while still allowing “open access” to their web sites by making the titles accessible
  • a11y_checklist - Similar to the SEO Checklist and QA Checklist modules, this module provides a checklist of accessibility-related modules and tasks to perform on a Drupal site.
  • textsize - This module display a adjustable text size changer or a zoom function on the page for a better web accessibility.
  • accessibility - The Accessibility module is a suite of tools for content authors and theme developers to ensure their website is as accessible as possible.
  • semantic fields - Semantic Fields was created to give users the ability of customizing and enhancing the HTML output of a field. With Semantic Fields enabled, users can specify the HTML wrapper element and classes for various elements.
  • semantic views - This Views plugin makes unformatted styles, field row styles and other output more readily configurable without needing to override template files. Instead of overriding row style templates for views where you want to specify different HTML elements (tags) and class attributes, you can specify these inside the Views UI and avoid overriding templates for each view.
  • switch themes - Adds a block to allow users to switch between enabled themes (useful to provide an alternative theme with more contrast for disabled users).
  • pagestyle - This module display a style changer on the page and in the browser menu for a better web accessibility.
  • eim - Extend the image module.

             Extended functionalities

                 - Adds checkboxes for the fields of image editing forms by content type.

                        - Alt field required

                        - Title field required

                 - Sets the Alt field maxlength value to 128 for editing forms of nodes.
  • youtube player accessibility controls - This module integrate YouTube Video Player Accessible Controls library which add buttons to control YouTube videos
  • universal subtitles - This module adds support for subtitled videos by the Universal Subtitles provider
Screen readers and emulators (testing and troubleshooting)

http://warc.calpoly.edu/accessibility/compliance_process_guide.html

http://webstyleguide.com/wsg3/1-process/7-development-process.html

Terms: Drupal Planetweb accessibilityaccessibility
Categories: Drupal

CounterStrike GO streamer the subject of latest incident of &quot;Swatting&quot; - by Zachary Strebeck

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 August 2014 - 4:58am
On August 27, a SWAT team responded to a threat at the offices of gaming group The Creatures in Littleton, CO. The threat, however, was fake, the latest incident of a prank known as “swatting.”
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Entity popup

New Drupal Modules - 27 August 2014 - 4:53am

This module allows you to show an entity in a popup. For flexibility, it doesn't provide any popup plugins itself, but it provides a menu callback that allows you to load the entity into any popup you desire. There are example modules included for Colorbox and for jQuery UI Dialog (included in Drupal Core).

Categories: Drupal

Brain Putty - Teaching A Match-Three Has Never Been This Hard - by Charlie Silver

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 August 2014 - 4:27am
"How do you re-teach players a genre they take for granted?"
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Developing a Flappy Bird clone in only 16 hours - by Vladimir Ignjatijevic

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 August 2014 - 3:50am
A short story how I've got this idea and how I've made another clone of Flappy Bird for the Android platform in only 16 hours (coding tips and tricks included).
Categories: Game Theory & Design

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Training spotlight: Search API with Apache Solr

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 3:45am

Learn how to build powerful Solr-based interfaces without writing code in Search API with ApacheSolr, an intermediate-level training provided by Zivtech at DrupalCon Amsterdam.

The team at Zivtech have developed open source tools which make setting up ApacheSolr instances and Search API configurations a breeze.

Instructor Jody Hamilton will walk you through set up and will introduce you to these tools at the beginning of the training, ensuring everyone quickly has a working ApacheSolr instance on a local sandbox site. Together you will build Views with Search API, and add and configure facets with Facet API. Students will use drush to work with with the search index, and finally the class will look at how you can improve search results relevancy and add custom fields to the index with a custom module.

Meet the Trainer from Zivtech

Jody Hamilton (Jody Lynn) is Co-Founder / CTO at Zivtech and has been giving public and private Drupal trainings for 6 years, including at the past 4 US DrupalCons.

Attend this Drupal Training

This training will be held on Monday, 29 September from 09:00-17:00 at the Amsterdam RAI during DrupalCon Amsterdam. The cost of attending this training is €400 and includes training materials, meals and coffee breaks. A DrupalCon ticket is not required to register to attend this event.

Our training courses are designed to be small enough to provide attendees plenty of one-on-one time with the instructor, but large enough that they are a good use of the instructor's time. Each training course must meet its minimum sign-up number by 5 September in order for the course to take place. You can help to ensure your training course takes place by registering before this date and reminding friends and colleagues to attend.

Register today

Categories: Drupal

Rude Bear RPG: Postmortem - by Alex Rose

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 August 2014 - 3:39am
A discussion of Rude Bear RPG, which was made in one weekend at Insomnia52 Gaming Festival for Ludum Dare 30.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: Nine days of hands-on sprinting opportunities at DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - 27 August 2014 - 3:33am

DrupalCon Amsterdam community sprints are starting in just one month from today. We have a great tradition to organize sprinting opportunities throughout DrupalCon days and also the weekends before and after. If you have been to them, you know the power of these events, but if you are new to our sprints, here are some quotes from an earlier sprint at Drupal Dev Days Szeged:

Two days working with the Drupal Community [...] help you to learn more than one week working alone at home :) -- https://twitter.com/javisr/statuses/449159591373586432

Greatest thing about code sprints: Hearing respected core devs say "I don't understand that." "Me neither." We all learn. [...] -- https://twitter.com/marcvangend/statuses/449442724966858752

Drupal sprints are a wonderful combination of a lot of top Drupal developers working on important problems in the same space without other distractions going on. We even secured a wonderful sprint location for the weekends, the Berlage Workspace. You can help move important issues forward and learn the tricky details faster than anybody else while working with others.


Berlage Workspace street front

Sprints announced so far include frontend, drupal.org, search API, multilingual, Behavior Driven Development, Panopoly, Rules in Drupal 8, Media in Drupal 8, Migration to Drupal 8, Content staging in Drupal 8 and a dedicated group of people driving critical Drupal 8 issues in general. Each team is being lead by Drupal topic experts so you can work with the top people in the field.

The most active days expected in decreasing order are Friday, Monday and Sunday before and Saturday after, but sprinting opportunities are almost always available throughout the nine days. We even created a Google Calendar that you can subscribe to (4j8sqq5fphhpgmrtfl8t2ggkes@group.calendar.google.com) which contains all the sprint venue information at any point in time, so you know where to find active Drupal sprinters. Or just check out the announcement for more information.

The sprints would not happen without the sponsorship of the Drupal Association, Acquia and Open8. Huge thanks for their support!

Categories: Drupal

Improving Kingdom Rush Frontiers - by Carlos Contreras Peinado

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 August 2014 - 3:24am
Some improvements to the great game: Kingdom Rush Frontiers
Categories: Game Theory & Design
Syndicate content


Google+
about seo