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Commerce iPay88 payment Gateway

New Drupal Modules - 13 November 2018 - 12:49am

Integrates Drupal Commerce with IPay88 (Malaysia) payment gateway to allow payments through Credit Cards, PayPal, Maybank2U, CIMB Clicks, etc.

Features

  1. Choose the payment options to use from admin settings.
  2. Important: Make sure the payment option selected supports your website's currency.
  3. Recurring payment support.
  4. Re-query (re-check) for payment status with IPay88 server on cron run (disabled by default).

Installation

Categories: Drupal

Mapplic Maps

New Drupal Modules - 13 November 2018 - 12:16am

Mapplic Maps

Categories: Drupal

Specbee: The CMS Designed Exclusively for Professional Publishing

Planet Drupal - 12 November 2018 - 10:55pm

Digital evolution has taken the world of professional publishing by storm. However, this evolution brought along a whole new set of challenges that publishers are still trying to cope up with.

Categories: Drupal

Ubercart Paytm Integration

New Drupal Modules - 12 November 2018 - 8:48pm
Categories: Drupal

Twinesocial : Social Media Content Marketing Platform

New Drupal Modules - 12 November 2018 - 2:41pm

Display your social media content with the TwineSocial Drupal module by using hashtags and user content, in a beautiful and interactive view.
To get started activate TwineSocial module and then go to Configuration->TwineSocial setting page to setup your account.

Categories: Drupal

Netlify

New Drupal Modules - 12 November 2018 - 11:39am

Triggers build hook on Netlify for selected content-types when you save a node.

Categories: Drupal

Kanopi Studios: Easier Editing with the Drupal 8 Paragraphs Edit module

Planet Drupal - 12 November 2018 - 11:24am

The Paragraphs module in Drupal 8 allows us to break content creation into components.  This is helpful for applying styles, markup, and structured data, but can put a strain on content creators who are used to WYSIWYG editors that allow them to click buttons to add, edit, and style content.

The Drupal Paragraphs Edit module adds contextual links to paragraphs that give you the ability to  edit, delete and duplicate paragraphs from the front end, giving editors a quick, easy and visual way to manage their content components.

Installing

Install and enable the module as you normally would, it is a zero configuration module.  It works with Drupal core’s Contextual Links and/or Quick Links module. I did have to apply this patch to get the cloning/duplication functionality working though.

Editing

To use, visit a page and hover over your content area.  You will see an icon in the upper right corner of the Paragraphs component area.   

When you click the Edit option, you are taken to an admin screen where you can edit only that component.

Make your changes and click save to be taken back to the page.

In components that are nested, like the Bootstrap Paragraphs columns component, you will see one contextual link above the nested components.  If you click this, you will be taken to the edit screen where you can modify the parent, and the children.  That is the Columns component, and the 3 text components inside.

Duplicating/Cloning

The term that is used most often for making a copy of something in Drupal is to “Clone” it.  This is a little more complicated because it is technically complicated, but once you get the hang of it, it will become second nature.

Hover over a contextual link and click Clone.

On the edit screen, you are presented with a new Clone To section.  In this section you can choose where to send this clone to, whether that be a Page or a Paragraph.  In this example, I want to duplicate this component to the same page.

  • Type: Content
  • Bundle: Page
  • Parent: (The page you are on)
  • Field: (The same field on that page.)

You can also make any edits you want before saving.  For example, you could change the background color. Click save, and your new component will appear at the bottom of the page, with the new background color.

There are a bunch of possibilities with this way to duplicate components.  To clone to another page, change the Parent. To clone to a nested paragraph component, change the Type to Paragraphs and configure the settings you need.

Deleting

Deleting a component is as you’d expect.  Once you click delete, you are taken to a confirmation screen that asks you if you want to delete.

Conclusion

The Paragraphs Edit module is a simple and powerful tool that gets us a bit closer to inline editing and making our content creator’s lives easier and allows them to be more productive.  Give it a try on your next project and spread the word about this great little helper module!

The post Easier Editing with the Drupal 8 Paragraphs Edit module appeared first on Kanopi Studios.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Why Drupal's Layout Builder is so powerful and unique

Planet Drupal - 12 November 2018 - 10:53am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Layout Builder, which will be in the next release of Drupal 8, is unique in that it can work with structured and unstructured content, and with templated and free-form pages.

Content authors want an easy-to-use page building experience; they want to create and design pages using drag-and-drop and WYSIWYG tools. For over a year the Drupal community has been working on a new Layout Builder, which is designed to bring this page building capability into Drupal core.

Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder is unique in offering a single, powerful visual design tool for the following three use cases:

  1. Layouts for templated content. The creation of "layout templates" that will be used to layout all instances of a specific content type (e.g. blog posts, product pages).
  2. Customizations to templated layouts. The ability to override these layout templates on a case-by-case basis (e.g. the ability to override the layout of a standardized product page)
  3. Custom pages. The creation of custom, one-off landing pages not tied to a content type or structured content (e.g. a single "About us" page).

Let's look at all three use cases in more detail to explain why we think this is extremely useful!

Use case 1: Layouts for templated content

For large sites with significant amounts of content it is important that the same types of content have a similar appearance.

A commerce site selling hundreds of different gift baskets with flower arrangements should have a similar layout for all gift baskets. For customers, this provides a consistent experience when browsing the gift baskets, making them easier to compare. For content authors, the templated approach means they don't have to worry about the appearance and layout of each new gift basket they enter on the site. They can be sure that once they have entered the price, description, and uploaded an image of the item, it will look good to the end user and similar to all other gift baskets on the site.

Drupal 8's new Layout Builder allows a site creator to visually create a layout template that will be used for each item of the same content type (e.g. a "gift basket layout" for the "gift basket" content type). This is possible because the Layout Builder benefits from Drupal's powerful "structured content" capabilities.

Many of Drupal's competitors don't allow such a templated approach to be designed in the browser. Their browser-based page builders only allow you to create a design for an individual page. When you want to create a layout that applies to all pages of a specific content type, it is usually not possible without a developer.

Use case 2: Customizations to templated layouts

While having a uniform look for all products of a particular type has many advantages, sometimes you may want to display one or more products in a slightly (or dramatically) different way.

Perhaps a customer recorded a video of giving their loved one one of the gift baskets, and that video has recently gone viral (because somehow it involved a puppy). If you only want to update one of the gift baskets with a video, it may not make sense to add an optional "highlighted video" field to all gift baskets.

Drupal 8's Layout Builder offers the ability to customize templated layouts on a case per case basis. In the "viral, puppy, gift basket" video example, this would allow a content creator to rearrange the layout for just that one gift basket, and put the viral video directly below the product image. In addition, the Layout Builder would allow the site to revert the layout to match all other gift baskets once the world has moved on to the next puppy video.

Since most content management systems don't allow you to visually design a layout pattern for certain types of structured content, they of course can't allow for this type of customization.

Use case 3: Custom pages (with unstructured content)

Of course, not everything is templated, and content authors often need to create one-off pages like an "About us" page or the website's homepage.

In addition to visually designing layout templates for different types of content, Drupal 8's Layout Builder can also be used to create these dynamic one-off custom pages. A content author can start with a blank page, design a layout, and start adding blocks. These blocks can contain videos, maps, text, a hero image, or custom-built widgets (e.g. a Drupal View showing a list of the ten most popular gift baskets). Blocks can expose configuration options to the content author. For instance, a hero block with an image and text may offer a setting to align the text left, right, or center. These settings can be configured directly from a sidebar.

In many other systems content authors are able to use drag-and-drop WYSIWYG tools to design these one-off pages. This type of tool is used in many projects and services such as Squarespace and the new Gutenberg Editor for WordPress (now available for Drupal, too!).

On large sites, the free-form page creation is almost certainly going to be a scalability, maintenance and governance challenge.

For smaller sites where there may not be many pages or content authors, these dynamic free-form page builders may work well, and the unrestricted creative freedom they provide might be very compelling. However, on larger sites, when you have hundreds of pages or dozens of content creators, a templated approach is going to be preferred.

When will Drupal's new Layout Builder be ready?

Drupal 8's Layout Builder is still a beta level experimental module, with 25 known open issues to be addressed prior to becoming stable. We're on track to complete this in time for Drupal 8.7's release in May 2019. If you are interested in increasing the likelihood of that, you can find out how to help on the Layout Initiative homepage.

An important note on accessibility

Accessibility is one of Drupal's core tenets, and building software that everyone can use is part of our core values and principles. A key part of bringing Layout Builder functionality to a "stable" state for production use will be ensuring that it passes our accessibility gate (Level AA conformance with WCAG and ATAG). This holds for both the authoring tool itself, as well as the markup that it generates. We take our commitment to accessibility seriously.

Impact on contributed modules and existing sites

Currently there a few methods in the Drupal module ecosystem for creating templated layouts and landing pages, including the Panels and Panelizer combination. We are currently working on a migration path for Panels/Panelizer to the Layout Builder.

The Paragraphs module currently can be used to solve several kinds of content authoring use-cases, including the creation of custom landing pages. It is still being determined how Paragraphs will work with the Layout Builder and/or if the Layout Builder will be used to control the layout of Paragraphs.

Conclusion

Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder is unique in that it supports multiple different use cases; from templated layouts that can be applied to dozens or hundreds of pieces of structured content, to designing custom one-off pages with unstructured content. The Layout Builder is even more powerful when used in conjunction with Drupal's other out-of-the-box features such as revisioning, content moderation, and translations, but that is a topic for a future blog post.

Special thanks to Ted Bowman (Acquia) for co-authoring this post. Also thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia), Angie Byron (Acquia), Alex Bronstein (Acquia), Jeff Beeman (Acquia) and Tim Plunkett (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: The Promet Family is Growing: Promet Acquires Digital Creative Agency DAHU

Planet Drupal - 12 November 2018 - 10:24am
  We’re thrilled to announce the acquisition of DAHU; a strategy-focused, user experience and design agency. By adding DAHU capabilities we have creatively and strategically “leveled up” to provide more comprehensive solutions for clients. Specifically, DAHU will enhance our UI design, User Experience and add the following capabilities: WordPress development, messaging, and branding.  
Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Drupal 8 Editor File Upload Module

Planet Drupal - 12 November 2018 - 8:57am
Episode Number: 217

The Drupal 8 Editor File Upload Module is a great module for allowing your content editors to upload files directly in your website content. If you have ever needed to upload a file, and then include a link to that file, then the Editor File Upload module will be useful. Rather than having to upload the file manually using FTP or through another module, then having to go back to create a link in your content to that file, this module lets you do it all in one step.

Tags: DrupalContribDrupal 8File ManagementSite BuildingDrupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Create better game settings options (handy checklist) - by Kevin Giguere

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 November 2018 - 7:51am
Because our games don't always get the in-depth testing we require, menus and settings often don't get a proper review. This handy checklist should help you ensure that your menu covers all the basics.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

D&D&Me: Does Dungeons & Dragons Have a Future in eSports? - by Andrew Heikkila

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 November 2018 - 7:50am
Liveplay RPGs and competitive eSports have always been on two opposite ends of the spectrum, but online streaming has tied them together in a fundamental way. Some are deciding to explore that connection further via competitive D&D.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Adaptive Music with Elias – Tutorial Series – Part 1 - by Dale Crowley

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 November 2018 - 7:49am
Adaptive music has come a long way in the past several years with custom middleware solutions like Elias. This article provides a step by step guide to re-creating an adaptive music project in Elias Studio.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Narrative Struggle - by Gregory Pellechi

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 November 2018 - 7:48am
Writing and Narrative Design are about more than telling stories, they're a question of what should be lost in compression that is creating a video game. It's not an easy choice, that's why we explore it on the latest episode of The Writing Game.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Swift vs Objective-C. Which iOS Language To Choose - by Aleksandra Bessalitskykh

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 November 2018 - 7:41am
Wondering what the difference is between Swift and Objective-C? Which language better suits your project? Check out the detailed Swift vs Objective-C comparison further to make the best choice.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

[Post Mortem - 1 year later]: I managed to ship 6000 copies to stay in business - by Constantin Bacioiu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 November 2018 - 7:37am
One year ago I failed to ship 700 units to stay in business. Now I'm working on my next game after releasing a major update to the original one. A failure post-mortem one year after. Sales, lucky strikes, community support and a heartfelt thank you update
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Getting Started on the DMs Guild – Part 1: Your First Product

Gnome Stew - 12 November 2018 - 7:04am

In early 2016, Wizards of the Coast and OneBookshelf launched the Dungeon Masters Guild, a site with a new kind of license that allows fans of D&D to publish and sell their own D&D content. I began publishing on the Guild in October of the same year, and in the last two years, I’ve made a lot of mistakes. Do you want to publish on the Guild? Because I’m here to share what I’ve learned and what I’ve gleaned from others so that you don’t have to make the same mistakes as we have.

The Initial Bubble-Bursting

Do you have an idea you want to work on? Something to write, to publish, to share with other passionate D&D fans? Awesome. Let me get the less-good stuff out of the way now, then, before you start writing.

There are some things you cannot publish on the DMs Guild at all. Here’s a quick rundown:

  • Your own homebrew settings – the only settings licensed for publication through the Guild are the Forgotten Realms, Ravenloft, and Eberron. I’m sure more are in the works behind the scenes, but this is what we have access to for now. You can also publish things that are “setting neutral” or “setting agnostic” meaning that they don’t have a specific world that they’re linked to.
  • Any editions other than 5th – the current edition is the only one eligible for the Guild. WotC is selling PDFs of older edition books through the Guild, but previous editions are off-limits for us regular publishers.
  • Work that contains intellectual property for Critical Role or The Adventure Zone or your other favorite D&D show – the licenses for these shows aren’t owned by Wizards of the Coast. ‘Nuff said.
    • Vecna – yes, this includes anything mentioning or pertaining to the lich god Vecna, who is technically from the world of Greyhawk and thus not eligible for the Guild. I’m specifically calling that out because I’ve seen more than one product pulled from the shelf for including an Eye or Hand of Vecna.
    • Any other intellectual property – this should be fairly self-explanatory by now.

dmsguild.com

DMs Guild Licensing and the SRD

The DMs Guild uses a slightly different licensing system than things published elsewhere using the SRD, or System Reference Document. For example, you can write an adventure in which the player characters fight Xanathar, the renowned Waterdhavian beholder, not that I’d ever recommend going toe-to-eyestalk with him. That could be published through the Guild, because the license gives publishers access to exclusive WotC intellectual property, like beholders, mind flayers, specific places and NPCs, etc.

On the other hand, if you were to publish elsewhere using just the SRD, you couldn’t include Xanathar or Waterdeep or any beholder at all. The trade-off here is that if you were to publish directly through DriveThruRPG, you keep a higher percentage of the royalties as a content creator than you do through the DMs Guild.

 …they’re more likely to turn to the DMs Guild than DriveThruRPG. Share1Tweet1+11Reddit1Email

It’s also key to mention here that anything published on the DMs Guild is then considered the property of Wizards of the Coast and cannot be published elsewhere. Even if you take it down from the Guild, making it no longer available there, it is still not “eligible” for publication elsewhere.

What I’ve found to be the main benefit of the Guild is that it has a much larger audience of D&D fans specifically than DriveThruRPG. When people want a new, unique monster or magic items to include in their games, or they want a pre-written one shot so they don’t have to prep much for game that night, I find they’re more likely to turn to the DMs Guild than DriveThruRPG.

dmsguild.com

Writing and Playtesting

So, now that we’ve gotten all that out of the way, let’s get down to business writing that neat idea of yours! My biggest advice here is to look at how information is presented in the three core D&D rulebooks. For example, if you want to publish a bunch of new magic items, take note of how the magic items in the Dungeon Master’s Guide are shown. The name of the item, the type and rarity, if it requires attunement, and then any other description text. Your readers will already be familiar with that format, and anything you can do to make using your product easier for them is a good thing.

For adventures, look to the published adventure modules – Storm King’s Thunder is my favorite example because I feel it’s the best organized of the current storylines. A description of a location might be the first thing under a new header, followed by events that happen while the players are there under a “Developments” header, and then all that good loot under a “Treasure” header. Sticking to the familiar layouts wherever possible is going to help you, in part because it makes your work look more professional.

 Sticking to the familiar layouts wherever possible is going to help you… Share1Tweet1+11Reddit1Email

When it comes to playtesting, I’ll be the first to tell you that while playtesting is good and important, it’s not the be-all, end-all of your product. My bigger suggestion would be to run your work by other players and DMs (both experienced and new ones if you can) and ask them what they think. Ask a DM if they would run your adventure and if anything glaring is missing. Ask players if they’d be interested in your magic items if they happened to appear in a hoard. Don’t try to make your product perfect. Perfect is the enemy of done.

dmsguild.com

Art, Covers, and Formatting

Speaking of looking professional… you don’t want to just upload a plain word document, do you? Of course not. You want a spiffy PDF, complete with the nice D&D fonts. If you intend to publish anything on the Guild, your next download needs to be the “DMs Guild Creator Resource – Adventure Template”. It’s a free resource provided by WotC and OneBookshelf to help you make your products look clean, professional, and uniform with the rest of the D&D brand. Use their official fonts, headers, stat block templates, etc. and you will save yourself a headache later wondering if your document is legible.

As for art and fancy covers… opinions vary, to say the least. Some people will say that a beautiful, full-art, full-color cover is the only way to sell a product, to hook a potential buyer. Other people will say that the plain-text cover with the big bold title and the DMs Guild logo is good enough for the Adventurer’s League (see above), so it’s good enough for them. There’s pros and cons to both: art can be an expensive upfront cost for a new creator, and a badly-designed cover is worse than no cover at all. Use your best judgment, and if you find that you’re getting really stressed out about the cover, don’t bother with fancy design. Make sure the title is legible and let everything else go. The same goes for interior art. I personally consider it nice-to-have, but not need-to-have.

 As for art and fancy covers… opinions vary, to say the least. Share1Tweet1+11Reddit1Email

If a budget is all that’s holding you back from including art, there is quite a lot of free or low-cost art available. Many artists sell bundles of images through DriveThruRPG and only ask that you provide proper attribution in your final product. Other times, you can find public domain and historical art that is able to be used for free (but should still be credited to the creator – come on, guys). I like to use illustrations from old books of fairy tales and folklore, which bring a classic look and feel while still having an element of the fantastical. You don’t have to commission full, unique pieces with exclusive commercial rights. I downright would advise against it, just because you will never see a full return on investment for that.

DMs Guild Logo

Dotting Your i’s and Crossing Your T’s

A few finishing touches are all it takes to make your product ready for publication. Make sure you have all of the below. Then double check. Maybe triple check, too.

  • Legal boilerplate text – a chunk of legal boilerplate is available in the FAQ under the “Content Guidelines” section. Read it and then copy-paste it at the end of your product, tweaking the year if need be. This is to cover you, to cover WotC, and to cover OneBookshelf. No one wants a lawsuit over this.
  • DMs Guild logo on the cover – it has to be there, no ifs, ands, or buts. You also cannot include any personal logos on the cover. You can put those inside, but not on the cover. There is a high-resolution image of the DMs Guild logo on that same “Content Guidelines” page (and above!).
  • Proper attribution and credits – if you used art, credit the artist. If you had playtesters, list their names. If an editor revised your project, list their name. This isn’t technically part of the DMs Guild Content Guidelines, but if you don’t do it, you’re a jerk.
  • Save it all as a PDF, but keep a separate Word doc version to incorporate later edits – yes, you may likely find your product will need edits or revisions later on.

And voila, just like that, you’re ready to publish! If that’s got you a little intimidated, never fear- in Part 2, we’ll talk about publication, marketing, and sales.

Let us know in the comments what you’re working on for the Guild!

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Agiledrop.com Blog: Interview with Adam Bergstein, aka Nerdstein: Should Drupal 8 core development slow down?

Planet Drupal - 12 November 2018 - 6:10am

Adam Bergstein is the maintainer of SimplyTest.me, runs the Drupal Coffee Exchange and participates in the Governance Task Force that just released its community proposal. Learn how Adam, aka Nerdstein, feels about Drupal 8 core development.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Field group: Scrollable tabs

New Drupal Modules - 12 November 2018 - 5:28am

Allows field groups to shown as scrollable groups.

Categories: Drupal

Why Drupal's Layout Builder is so powerful and unique

Dries Buytaert - 12 November 2018 - 4:02am

Content authors want an easy-to-use page building experience; they want to create and design pages using drag-and-drop and WYSIWYG tools. For over a year the Drupal community has been working on a new Layout Builder, which is designed to bring this page building capability into Drupal core.

Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder is unique in offering a single, powerful visual design tool for the following three use cases:

  1. Layouts for templated content. The creation of "layout templates" that will be used to layout all instances of a specific content type (e.g. blog posts, product pages).
  2. Customizations to templated layouts. The ability to override these layout templates on a case-by-case basis (e.g. the ability to override the layout of a standardized product page)
  3. Custom pages. The creation of custom, one-off landing pages not tied to a content type or structured content (e.g. a single "About us" page).

Let's look at all three use cases in more detail to explain why we think this is extremely useful!

Use case 1: Layouts for templated content

For large sites with significant amounts of content it is important that the same types of content have a similar appearance.

A commerce site selling hundreds of different gift baskets with flower arrangements should have a similar layout for all gift baskets. For customers, this provides a consistent experience when browsing the gift baskets, making them easier to compare. For content authors, the templated approach means they don't have to worry about the appearance and layout of each new gift basket they enter on the site. They can be sure that once they have entered the price, description, and uploaded an image of the item, it will look good to the end user and similar to all other gift baskets on the site.

Drupal 8's new Layout Builder allows a site creator to visually create a layout template that will be used for each item of the same content type (e.g. a "gift basket layout" for the "gift basket" content type). This is possible because the Layout Builder benefits from Drupal's powerful "structured content" capabilities.

Many of Drupal's competitors don't allow such a templated approach to be designed in the browser. Their browser-based page builders only allow you to create a design for an individual page. When you want to create a layout that applies to all pages of a specific content type, it is usually not possible without a developer.

Use case 2: Customizations to templated layouts

While having a uniform look for all products of a particular type has many advantages, sometimes you may want to display one or more products in a slightly (or dramatically) different way.

Perhaps a customer recorded a video of giving their loved one one of the gift baskets, and that video has recently gone viral (because somehow it involved a puppy). If you only want to update one of the gift baskets with a video, it may not make sense to add an optional "highlighted video" field to all gift baskets.

Drupal 8's Layout Builder offers the ability to customize templated layouts on a case per case basis. In the "viral, puppy, gift basket" video example, this would allow a content creator to rearrange the layout for just that one gift basket, and put the viral video directly below the product image. In addition, the Layout Builder would allow the site to revert the layout to match all other gift baskets once the world has moved on to the next puppy video.

Since most content management systems don't allow you to visually design a layout pattern for certain types of structured content, they of course can't allow for this type of customization.

Use case 3: Custom pages (with unstructured content)

Of course, not everything is templated, and content authors often need to create one-off pages like an "About us" page or the website's homepage.

In addition to visually designing layout templates for different types of content, Drupal 8's Layout Builder can also be used to create these dynamic one-off custom pages. A content author can start with a blank page, design a layout, and start adding blocks. These blocks can contain videos, maps, text, a hero image, or custom-built widgets (e.g. a Drupal View showing a list of the ten most popular gift baskets). Blocks can expose configuration options to the content author. For instance, a hero block with an image and text may offer a setting to align the text left, right, or center. These settings can be configured directly from a sidebar.

In many other systems content authors are able to use drag-and-drop WYSIWYG tools to design these one-off pages. This type of tool is used in many projects and services such as Squarespace and the new Gutenberg Editor for WordPress (now available for Drupal, too!).

On large sites, the free-form page creation is almost certainly going to be a scalability, maintenance and governance challenge.

For smaller sites where there may not be many pages or content authors, these dynamic free-form page builders may work well, and the unrestricted creative freedom they provide might be very compelling. However, on larger sites, when you have hundreds of pages or dozens of content creators, a templated approach is going to be preferred.

When will Drupal's new Layout Builder be ready?

Drupal 8's Layout Builder is still a beta level experimental module, with 25 known open issues to be addressed prior to becoming stable. We're on track to complete this in time for Drupal 8.7's release in May 2019. If you are interested in increasing the likelihood of that, you can find out how to help on the Layout Initiative homepage.

An important note on accessibility

Accessibility is one of Drupal's core tenets, and building software that everyone can use is part of our core values and principles. A key part of bringing Layout Builder functionality to a "stable" state for production use will be ensuring that it passes our accessibility gate (Level AA conformance with WCAG and ATAG). This holds for both the authoring tool itself, as well as the markup that it generates. We take our commitment to accessibility seriously.

Impact on contributed modules and existing sites

Currently there a few methods in the Drupal module ecosystem for creating templated layouts and landing pages, including the Panels and Panelizer combination. We are currently working on a migration path for Panels/Panelizer to the Layout Builder.

The Paragraphs module currently can be used to solve several kinds of content authoring use-cases, including the creation of custom landing pages. It is still being determined how Paragraphs will work with the Layout Builder and/or if the Layout Builder will be used to control the layout of Paragraphs.

Conclusion

Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder is unique in that it supports multiple different use cases; from templated layouts that can be applied to dozens or hundreds of pieces of structured content, to designing custom one-off pages with unstructured content. The Layout Builder is even more powerful when used in conjunction with Drupal's other out-of-the-box features such as revisioning, content moderation, and translations, but that is a topic for a future blog post.

Special thanks to Ted Bowman (Acquia) for co-authoring this post. Also thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia), Angie Byron (Acquia), Alex Bronstein (Acquia), Jeff Beeman (Acquia) and Tim Plunkett (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

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