Newsfeeds

Configurable Blocks

New Drupal Modules - 29 June 2017 - 5:41am

This module resolves the known issue of exporting custom Block configuration but the block let content title/body editable. Good example is footer contact phone or copyright notes. If you have ever done deployment to staging environments, you know the issue.

Works well with following modules :

  • Context
  • Features Strongarm
Categories: Drupal

Jeff Geerling's Blog: Drupal VM 4.6 adds Debian 9 (Stretch), Vagrant plugin auto-install, and more Docker

Planet Drupal - 29 June 2017 - 5:30am

Drupal VM has been hitting its stride this year; after adding experimental Docker support in 4.5, Docker usage has been refined in 4.6 (with a more stable and useful drupal-vm Docker image, along with a few other things:

Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: Drupal site-building: why that's more than a trend

Planet Drupal - 29 June 2017 - 3:53am

“Drupal learning curve is horrible”, “it literally made me want to die”: Drupal learning curve this, Drupal learning curve that... You must have faced with all this pain that novice Drupalists tend to experience.  

Meanwhile a number or Drupal usage is growing, the Drupal Community is growing, too. The thing is, Drupal offers an incredible amount of ways to become a part of the Drupal Community. Drupal’s features make it accessible even to non-coders, such as content managers, site-builders. What’s more important, the Drupal development team is going to pay even more attention to those groups (without compromising coders, of course).

 

Let’s see what this amazing CMS offers to non-coding part of the Community and why this is not just a trend.

 

Categories: Drupal

Clemens Tolboom: Check your coding style on Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 29 June 2017 - 3:24am
Coding style?

Building software is a complex and sometimes tedious process in which you make errors and mistakes. Testing for errors is mostly done by running your website / code through tests either manually or automatically.

Checking for your code style like formatting and documentation flaws you can use a code sniffer. For PHP you can run phpcs using PHP_CodeSniffer.

Drupal core provides core/phpcs.xml.dist to tell phpcs what to test for.

Categories: Drupal

Words on a Screen: Good Posts and Bad Posts

RPGNet - 29 June 2017 - 12:00am
The etiquette of PbP.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Colorfield: CKEditor Media Embed wrapper for Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 28 June 2017 - 11:47pm
CKEditor Media Embed wrapper for Drupal 7 christophe Thu, 29/06/2017 - 08:47 Looks like most of my Drupal 7 clients are sharing the enthusiasm for CKEditor Media Embed and didn't want to wait for a Drupal 8 upgrade of their site, so here is a wrapper module for that. There are probably way better implementations, like the one that was done for Drupal 8, but I wanted to have something quickly ready with close to zero maintenance. Also, it had to rely on the Wysiwyg module and not the CKEditor standalone module.
Categories: Drupal

Verification Code

New Drupal Modules - 28 June 2017 - 11:26pm

Verification Code module provide extra authentication ability for Drupal. By integrate with Drupal forms, verification code module can send short dynamic code to user's email or mobile phone, user need to enter the right verification code to submit a integrated form.

Features:

Categories: Drupal

Alidayu API

New Drupal Modules - 28 June 2017 - 10:10pm

Alidayu (阿里大于) is an SMS services platform founded by Alibaba Group (NYSE:BABA), to provide stable, reliable and fast SMS services for Chinese mobile users. It can be used to send SMS messages, verification codes, bulk messages and audio messages to mobile users in China. China Telecom(中国电信)、China Unicom(中国联通) and China Mobile(中国移动) and other virutal SPs in China are supported. For more information about Alidayu, please visit website: https://www.alidayu.com

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: DrupalCon sessions about Symfony

Planet Drupal - 28 June 2017 - 8:02pm
Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Business. Before that, we explored the area of PHP, DevOps, Front End, Site Building, Drupal Showcase, Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. Quite a lot of areas, so this will be our last stop. We will only look at Drupalcon sessions about Symfony. Events: The Object Oriented Hook System by Nida Ismail Shah from Acquia This session threw some light on how to create, trigger, subscribe and listen to events in Drupal 8.   Everything about Unicode all PHP devs should know by Nicolas Grekas from… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Jacob Rockowitz: Webform 8.x-5.x-beta14: Ajaxifying Webforms and Improving User Submission Management

Planet Drupal - 28 June 2017 - 6:17pm

Webform 8.x-5.x-beta14 has become a significant release because it addresses several important features and milestones listed on the Webform roadmap, including support for multiple drafts, Ajax-enhancing submission forms and the administrative UI.

Before I start to "show-n-telling" you about these cool new features, wanted to announce that I am targeting monthly releases and explain my goals for each release of the Webform module.

Monthly Releases

Initially,I was reluctant to publically commit to regular releases for software that I am maintaining for free. Turns out my public commitment is a good thing. Targeting regular releases motivates me to organize the Webform's roadmap and issue queue while iteratively working on fixing bugs and adding new features. I’m trying to take an agile approach with maintaining the Webform module that seeks to iteratively implement working features knowing that features and functionality can and should evolve over time.

The Webform for Drupal 8 (formerly known as YAML Form module) is a completely new codebase striving to reach reasonable feature parity with the Webform 7.x-4.x module, which is used by a half million Drupal 7 websites. I've also looked at the Webform ecosystem for Drupal 7 - gradually I’m integrating key Webform add-on modules into the core Webform module for Drupal 8.

Ajaxifying Webform Forms and User Interface

The Webform Ajax module is a perfect example of a contrib module for Drupal 7 that I wanted to add to the core Webform module. Personally,...Read More

Categories: Drupal

Account Kit

New Drupal Modules - 28 June 2017 - 1:36pm

Facebook's Account Kit integration for Drupal 8.

Categories: Drupal

Playerunknown's Battlegrounds has banned 25k cheaters since launch

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 28 June 2017 - 12:02pm

"This is an ongoing battle, but one we are committed to fighting," explained the titular Playerunknown. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Wargaming opens mobile game development and publishing division

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 28 June 2017 - 11:03am

The freshly christened division will support the development of Wargaming's own mobile titles while also acting as a publisher for other mobile game developers. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

CKEditor Styles JS

New Drupal Modules - 28 June 2017 - 9:46am

Provide a CKEditor style set in your theme.

Categories: Drupal

Assembly

New Drupal Modules - 28 June 2017 - 9:44am

Compose rich content with modular, assembled building blocks.

Categories: Drupal

jQuery.dotdotdot

New Drupal Modules - 28 June 2017 - 8:41am
Project Description

This module provides the jQuery.dotdotdot plugin as a library.

Categories: Drupal

An object at rest

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 17 May 2008 - 2:03pm

So obviously, the pendulum of progress stopped swinging on my game.  As much as I tried to prevent it, pressing obligations just wouldn’t take a back seat (nor would the burglars who, a few weeks ago, stole 90% of my wardrobe and who last week stole my monitor).  So after a string of hectic weekends and even crazier weeks, this weekend has been pretty wide open for doing whatever I want to do.  And not a moment too soon!

So after doing all the other things I try to do with my weekends, I finally loaded up the ol’ Inform 7 IDE and started working on my game.  To get me back in the swing of things, so to speak, I started reading through what I’d already written.  It was an interesting experience.

Strangely, what impressed me most was stuff I had done that I have since forgotten I learned how to do.  Silly little things, like actions I defined that actually worked, that had I tried to write them today, probably would have had me stumped for a while.  Go me!  Except, erm, I seem to have forgotten more than I’ve retained.

I also realized the importance of commenting my own code.  For instance, there’s this snippet:

A thing can be attached or unattached. A thing is usually unattached. A thing that is a part of something is attached.

The problem is, I have no idea why I put it in there – it doesn’t seem relevant to anything already in the game, so I can only imagine that I had some stroke of genius that told me I was going to need it “shortly” (I probably figured I’d be writing the code the next night).  So now, there’s that lonely little line, just waiting for its purpose.  I’m sure I’ll come across it some day; for now, I’ve stuck in a comment to remind myself to stick in a comment when I do remember.

It reminds me of all the writing I did when I was younger.  I was just bursting with creativity when I was a kid, constantly writing the first few pages of what I was sure was going to be a killer story.  And then I’d misplace the notebook or get sidetracked by something else, or do any of the million other things that my easily distracted self tends to do.  Some time later, I’d come across the notebook, read the stuff I’d written and think, “Wow, this is great stuff!  Now… where was I going with it?”  And I’d never remember, or I’d remember and re-forget.  Either way, in my mother’s attic there are piles and piles of notebooks with half-formed thoughts that teem with potential never to be fulfilled.

This situation – that of wanting to resume progress but fumbling to pick up the threads of where I left off –  has me scouring my memory for a term I read in Jack London’s Call of the Wild.  There was a part in the book where Buck’s owner (it’s late, his name has escaped me) has been challenged to some sort of competition to see if Buck can get the sled moving from a dead stop.  I seem to remember that the runners were frozen to the ground.  I thought the term was “fast break” or “break fast” or something to that effect, but diligent (does 45 seconds count as diligent?) searching has not confirmed this or provided me with the right term.  Anyway, that’s how it feels tonight – I feel as if I’m trying to heave a frozen sled free from its moorings.

The upside is, I am still pleased with what I have so far.  That’s good because it means I’m very likely to continue, rather than scrap it altogether and pretend that I’ll come up with a new idea tomorrow.  In the meantime, I’ll be looking for some SnoMelt and a trusty St. Bernard to get things moving again.


Categories:

Time enough (to write) at last…

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 14 April 2008 - 3:24pm

So I didn’t get as much coding done over the weekend as I had hoped, mainly because the telephone company *finally* installed my DSL line, which meant I was up til 5:30 Saturday am catching up on the new episodes of Lost.  That, in turn, meant that most of the weekend was spent wishing I hadn’t stayed up until such an ungodly hour, and concentration just wasn’t in the cards.

However, I did get some stuff done, which is good.  Even the tiniest bit of progress counts as momentum, which is crucial for me.  If the pendulum stops swinging, it will be very hard for me to get it moving again.

So the other day, as I was going over the blog (which really is as much a tool for me as it is a way for me to share my thoughts with others), I realized I had overlooked a very basic thing when coding the whole “automatically return the frog to the fuschia” bit…

As the code stood, if the player managed to carry the frog to another room before searching it, the frog would get magically returned to the fuschia.  This was fairly simple to resolve, in the end – I just coded it so that the game moves (and reports) the frog back to fuschia before leaving the room.  I also decided to add in a different way of getting the key out of the frog – in essence, rewarding different approaches to the same problem with success.

Which brings me to the main thrust of today’s post.  I have such exacting standards for the games I play.  I love thorough implementation.  My favorite games are those that build me a cool gameworld and let me tinker and explore, poking at the shadows and pulling on the edges to see how well it holds up.  A sign of a good game is one that I will reopen not to actually play through again, but to just wander around the world, taking in my surroundings.  I’ve long lamented the fact that relatively few games make this a rewarding experience – even in the best games, even slight digging tends to turn up empty, unimplemented spots.

What I am coming to appreciate is just how much work is involved in the kind of implementation I look for.  Every time I pass through a room’s description, or add in scenery objects, I realize just how easy it is to find things to drill down into.  Where there’s a hanging plant, there’s a pot, dirt, leaves, stems, wires to hang from, hooks to hang on, etc.  Obviously, unless I had all the time in the world, I couldn’t implement each of these separately, so I take what I believe to be the accepted approach and have all of the refer to the same thing.  Which, in my opinion, is fine.  I don’t mind if a game has the same responses for the stems as it does for the plant as a whole, as long as it has some sort of relevant response.  Even so, this takes a lot of work.  It might be the obsessive part of me, but I can’t help but think “What else would a person think of when looking at a hanging plant?”

Or, as I’ve come to think of it:  WWBTD?

What Would Beta Testers Do?

I’ve taken to looking at a “fully” implemented room and wondering what a player might reasonably (and in some cases unreasonably) be expected to do.  This is a bit of a challenging process for me – I already know how my mind works, so trying to step outside of my viewpoint and see it from a blind eye is hard.   I should stop for a second to note that I fully intend to have my game beta tested once it reaches that point, but the fewer obvious things there are for testers to trip over, the more time and energy they’ll have for really digging in and trying to expose the weaknesses I can’t think of.

I’ve found one resource that is both entertaining and highly informative to me:  ClubFloyd transcripts.  ClubFloyd, for the uninitiated (a group among which I count myself, of course) is a sort of cooperative gaming experience — if anyone who knows better reads this and cares to correct what may well be a horrible description, by all means!– where people get together on the IFMud and play through an IF title.  The transcripts are both amusing and revealing.  I recently read the Lost Pig transcript and it was quite interesting.  The things people will attempt to do are both astonishing and eye-opening.  In the case of Lost Pig (which, fortunately, I had already played before reading the transcript), what was even more amazing was the depth of the game itself.  I mean, people were doing some crazy ass stuff – eating the pole, lighting pants on fire, and so on.  And it *worked*.  Not only did it work, it was reversible.  You obviously need the pole, so there’s a way to get it back if, in a fit of orc-like passion, you decide to shove it in down Grunk’s throat.

Anyway, my point is, the transcripts gave me a unique perspective on the things people will try, whether in an effort to actually play the game, to amuse themselves, or to amuse others.  Definitely good stuff to keep in mind when trying to decide, say, the different ways people will try to interact with my little porcelain frog.

Other Stuff I Accomplished

So I coded in an alternate way to deal with the frog that didn’t conflict with the “standard” approach.  I also implemented a few more scenery objects.  Over the course of the next few days, I’m going to try to at least finish the descriptions of the remaining rooms so that I can wander around a bit and start really getting to the meat of it all.  I also want to work on revising the intro text a bit.  In an effort to avoid the infodumps that I so passionately hate, I think I went a little too far and came away with something a bit too terse and uninformative.  But that’s the really fun part of all of this – writing and re-writing, polishing the prose and making it all come together.

Whattaya know.  Midnight again.  I think I’m picking up on a trend here.


Categories:

Day Nothing – *shakes fist at real life*

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 8 April 2008 - 12:13pm

Grrr… I’ve been so bogged down in work and client emergencies that progress on the game is at a temporary (no, really!  Only temporary) standstill.  I’ve managed to flesh out a few more room and scenery descriptions, but have not accomplished anything noteworthy in a few days.  Hopefully after this week most of the fires on the work front will be extinguished, and I’ll have time to dive into the game this weekend.

(She says to no one, since there’s been one hit on this blog since… it started.)


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