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OSTraining: How to use Search API Solr Search in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 22 August 2018 - 10:00am

Apache Solr is a very popular open source search platform, based on the Java Lucene Library. Solr is very stable, scalable and reliable and provides a wide set of core search functions. Solr creates an index of the available documents and then you can query Solr to return the most relevant ones for your search.

For Drupal users, it is possible to integrate your site with Solr. The Search API Solr Search module (yes, that name is a mouthful!) provides a Solr backend for the Drupal Search API module.

This tutorial will deal with the integration between Drupal and the Solr platform. Before you begin, you will need to have installed Apache Solr on your server. 

Categories: Drupal

Going Through Forbidden Otherworlds

New RPG Product Reviews - 22 August 2018 - 9:55am
Publisher: Lamentations of the Flame Princess
Rating: 4
Going Through Forbidden Otherworlds, or GTFO (cute huh) is again a case of me getting something that is exactly what I need. While I am not going to play it as-is, there is a tweak mentioned in the book itself that works perfectly for me. In fact, a lot of this book works perfectly for me and my next set of adventures. I can't believe I am saying this, but I will turn up the gore factor in this Lamentations product for my needs.

Not a real fan of the art inside but I see why it works for this.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Paragraph Force Remove

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2018 - 8:24am
Introduction

This module is an extension of the Paragraphs module. It creates an admin page where every revision of paragraphs can be viewed. It then has a button interface that allows for the deletion of all paragraph revision of a certain paragraph type. This is useful when you want a paragraph type to be deleted, but it is tied to an entity by an old revision.

Some times paragraph types cannot be deleted because they are held in an revision of a entity. This module makes it possible for the paragraph to be deleted by deleting all the revisions that a paragraph type is used in.

Categories: Drupal

Views: Media taxonomy filter

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2018 - 8:17am

This lightweight module is trying to solve the problem that Views filter named "Content has taxonomy term ID (with depth)" is available only for nodes and can not be used for media entities.

Related issue in Drupal Core : Views should support - Entity: Has taxonomy term ID (with depth) - for entities

The Module extends Taxonomy module from Drupal core and provides a new filter "Product has taxonomy term ID (with depth)".

Categories: Drupal

How our 2 year old demo got 2 million views on YouTube - by David Mitchell

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 August 2018 - 6:51am
A few weeks ago we released a 2 year old demo of The Mannequin on itch.io. Nothing could have prepared us for what happened next.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Crush of Bones. Week 2 - by Andrei Semiankovich

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 August 2018 - 6:47am
The "Crush of Bones" project at Polygon Gamelab #Release completed its second week. During the week efforts of all departments (game design, marketing, art, developers) were aimed at finding the optimal control system, visual style and creating a story.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Ideas and dynamic conversation in Heaven's Vault - by Jon Ingold

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 August 2018 - 6:37am
Heaven's Vault uses a knowledge model to track the player's activity and offer valid actions and dialogue. But it's also letting us give our characters' something else: a train of thought to guides what they say, when.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Chromatic: Selling Code

Planet Drupal - 22 August 2018 - 6:24am

A pull request is like a product looking for a buyer. Are you selling yours effectively?

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Website Accessibility F.A.Q.s [Video Recording and Transcript]

Planet Drupal - 22 August 2018 - 5:04am

At Mediacurrent, we hear a lot of questions — from the open source community and from our customers — about website accessibility. What are the must-have tools, resources, and modules? How often should I test? To address those and other top FAQs, we hosted a webinar with front end developers Ben Robertson and Tobias Williams, back end developer Mark Casias, and UX designer Becky Cierpich.

The question that drives all others is this: Why should one care about web accessibility? To kick-off the webinar, Ben gave a compelling answer. He covered many of the topics you’ve read about on the Mediacurrent blog: introducing WCAG Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, some the benefits of website accessibility (including improved usability and SEO) and the threats of non-compliance.

Adam Kirby: Hi everybody, this is Adam Kirby. I'm the Director of Marketing here at Mediacurrent. Thanks everyone for joining us. Today we're going to go over website accessibility frequently asked questions. 

Our first question is: 

Are there automated tools I can use to ensure my site is accessible and what are the best free tools? 

Becky Cierpich: Yes! Automated tools that I like to use —and these are actually all free tools— are WEBAIM’s WAVE tool, you can use that as a browser extension. There's also Chrome Accessibility Developer Tools and Khan Academy has a Chrome Plugin called Tota11y. So with these things, you can get a report of all the errors and warnings on a page. Automated testing catches about 30 percent of errors, but it takes a human to sort through and intellectually interpret the results and then determine the most inclusive user experience. 

What's the difference between human and automated testing? 

Becky Cierpich: Well, as I said, the automated tools can catch 30 percent of errors and we need a human on the back end of that to interpret. And then we use the manual tools, things like Chrome Vox or VoiceOver for Mac, those are some things you can turn on if you want to simulate a user experience from the auditory side, you can do keyboard only navigation to simulate that experience. Those things will really help you to kind of drive behind the wheel of what another user's experiencing and catch any errors in the flow that may have come from, you know, the code not being up to up to spec. 

Then we also have color contrast checkers. WEBAIM has a good one for that and all these are free tools and they can allow you to test one color against another. You can verify areas that have too little contrast and test adjustments that'll fix the contrast. 

What do the terms WCAG, W3C, WAI, Section 508, and ADA Title III mean? 

Mark Casias: I'll take that one - everybody loves a good acronym. WCAG, these are Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. This is the actual document that gives you the ideas of what you need to change or what you want to a base your site on. W3C stands for World Wide Web Consortium - these are the people who control the web standardization. WAI is the Web Accessibility Initiative and refers to the section of the W3C that focuses on accessibility. 

Finally, Section 508 is part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, well it was added to that act in 1998, to require Federal agencies to make their electronic and IT  accessible to people with disabilities. ADA Title III is part of the Americans with Disabilities Act which focuses on private businesses, it mandates that they need to be fully accessible to individuals with disabilities. 

 What are the different levels of compliance? 

Tobias Williams: Briefly, the WCAG Web Content Accessibility Guidelines tell us that there are three levels - A, AA, and AAA, with AAA being the highest level of compliance. These are internationally agreed to, voluntary standards. Level A has the minimum requirements for the page to be accessible. Level AA builds on the accessibility of level A, examples include consideration of navigation placement and contrast of colors. Level AAA again builds on the previous level - certain videos have sign language translation and improved color contrast. 

To meet the standard of each level there are 5 requirements that are detailed on the WCAG site. Every every actionable part of the site has to be 100% compliant. WCAG doesn't require that a claim to a standard be made, and these grades are not specified by the ADA but are often referenced when assessing how accessible the site is.

Should we always aim for AAA standards?

Ben Robertson: How we approach it is we think you should aim for AA compliance. That's going to make sure that you're covering all the bases. You have to do an internal audit of who are your users and what are your priorities and who you're trying to reach. And then see out of those, where do the AAA guidelines come in and where can you get the biggest bang for your buck? I think that the smart way to do it is to prioritize. Because when you get to the AAA level, it can be a very intense process, like captioning every single video on your site. So you have to prioritize. 

What Drupal modules can help with accessibility?

Mark Casias: Drupal.org has a great page that lists a good portion of these modules for accessibility.  One that they don't have on there is the AddtoAny module that allows you to share your content. We investigated this for our work on the Grey Muzzle site and found this was the most accessible option. Here are some other modules you can try:

  • Automatic Alternative Text -The module uses the Microsoft Azure Cognitive Services API to generate an Alternative Text for images when no Alternative Text has been provided by user.
  • Block ARIA Landmark Roles -Inspired by Block Class, this module adds additional elements to the block configuration forms that allow users to assign a ARIA landmark role to a block.
  • CKEditor Abbreviation - Adds a button to CKEditor for inserting and editing abbreviations. If an existing abbr tag is selected, the context menu also contains a link to edit the abbreviation.
  • CKEditor Accessibility Checker - The CKEditor Accessibility Checker module enables the Accessibility Checker plugin from CKEditor.com in your WYSIWYG.
  • High contrast - Provides a quick solution to allow the user to switch between the active theme and a high contrast version of it. (Still in beta)
  • htmLawed  - The htmLawed module uses the htmLawed PHP library to restrict and purify HTML for compliance with site administrator policy and standards and for security. Use of the htmLawed library allows for highly customizable control of HTML markup.
  • Siteimprove - The Siteimprove plugin bridges the gap between Drupal and the Siteimprove Intelligence Platform.
  • Style Switcher - The module takes the fuss out of creating themes or building sites with alternate stylesheets.
  • Text Resize - The Text Resize module provides your end-users with a block that can be used to quickly change the font size of text on your Drupal site.
At what point in a project or website development should I think about accessibility? 

Becky Cierpich: I got this one! Well, the short answer is always and forever. Always think about accessibility. I work a lot at the front end of a project doing strategy and design. So what we try to do is bake it in from the very beginning. We'll take analytics data and then wecan get to know the audience that way. That's how you can kind of plan and prioritize your features. If you want to do AAA features, you can figure out who your users are before you go ahead and plan that out. Another thing we do is look at personas. You can create personas that have limitations and that way when you go in and design. You can be sure to capture those people who might be challenged by even things like a temporary disability, slow Internet connection or colorblind - things that people don't necessarily even think of this as a disability.

I would also say don't worry if you already have a site and you know, it's definitely not compliant or you're not sure because Mediacurrent can come in and audit, using the testing tools to interpret and prioritize and slowly you can get up speed over time. It's not something that you have to necessarily do overnight. 

How often should I check for accessibility compliance? 

Tobias Williams: I’ll take this one - I also work on the front end, implementing Becky’s designs. When you're building anything new for a site, you should be accessibility testing. test work, During cross-browser testing, we should also be checking that our code meets the accessibility standards we are maintaining.

Now that's easy to do on a new cycle because you're in the process of building a product that currently exists. I would say anytime you make any kind of change or you're focused on any kind of barrier of the fight, I would run a quick accessibility check. And then even if you don't address the changes straight away or at least you're aware of that, you can document them and work on them later. As far as an in-production site where you have a lot of content creators, or where independent groups work on features it is also a good idea to run quarterly spot checks. 

I've seen these on a few sites, but what is an accessibility statement and do I need one?

Becky Cierpich: An accessibility statement is similar to something like a privacy agreement. It's a legal document and there are templates to do it. It basically states clearly what level of accessibility the website is targeting. If you have any areas that still need improvement, you can acknowledge those and outline your plan to achieve those goals and when you're targeting to have that done. It can add a measure of legal protection while you're implementing any fixes. And if your site is up to code, it's a powerful statement to the public that your organization is recognizing the importance of an inclusive approach to your web presence. 

What are the legal ramifications of not having an accessible website? 

Ben Robertson: I'll jump in here, but I just want to make a disclaimer that I'm not a lawyer. Take what I say with several grains of salt! This whole space is pretty new in terms of legal requirements. The landmark case was  Winn-Dixie, the grocery store chain — it was filed under title III of ADA Act and they lost. It was brought up by a blind customer who could not use their website. The court order is available online and it's an interesting read but basically, there were no damages sought in the case. The court ordered that

they had to have an accessibility statement that said that they would follow WCAG 2.0. That's a great refresh for site editors to make sure that they're following best practices. They also mandated quarterly automated accessibility testing. 

I really think if you have these things in place already, you're really gonna mitigate pretty much all your risk. You can get out in front of it if you have a plan. 

If I have an SEO expert, do I need an accessibility expert as well? 

Tobias Williams: I'll explain what we do at Mediacurrent. We don't have one person who is an expert. We have a group of people. We have several developers, designers and other people on the team who are just interested in the subject and we meet once a week, we have a Slack channel where you just talk about accessibility. There are people who are most familiar with different aspects of it and that allows us to be better rounded as a group. 

I can see somebody being hired to be an accessibility expert but I think that the dialogue within a company about this issue is most important. The more people who are aware of it, the better. You can prevent problems before they occur. So, if I'm aware of the accessibility requirements of an item building, I'm going to build it the right way as opposed to having to be reviewed by the expert and then making changes. The more people who are talking about it and were involved in it and I'm the general level of knowledge, it goes a long way. We don't need to have experts as much as we need to have interested people. 

As a content editor, what's my role in website accessibility?

Mark Casias: Your role is very important in website accessibility. All the planning and site building that I do [as a developer] won't mean a thing if you don't attach an image alt tag to your images or you use a bunch of H1 title tags because you want the font size to be bigger and things like that. Content editors need to be aware of what they're doing and its impact on accessibility. They need to know the requirements and they need to make sure that their information is. keeping the website rolling in the right direction. Check out Mediacurrent’s Go-To-Guide for Website Accessibility for more on how to do this. 

Some of the technical requirements for accessibility seem costly and complex. What are the options for an organization?

Ben Robertson: Yeah, I totally agree. Sometimes you will get an accessibility audit back and you just see a long list of things that are red and wrong. It can seem overwhelming. I think there's really a couple of things to keep in mind here is that one, you don't have to do everything all at once. You can create an accessibility statement and you can create a plan and start working through that plan. Two, it really helps to have someone with experience or an experienced team to help you go through this process. There can be things that are a very high priority that are very easy to fix and there can be things that may be a low priority.

You can also think about it this way: if you got a report from a contractor that something you're building was not up to code, you would want to fix that. And so this is kind of a similar thing. People aren't going to be injured from using your website if it's inaccessible but it's the right thing to do. It's how websites are supposed to be built if you're following the guidelines, and it's really good to help your business overall. 

How much does it cost to have and maintain an accessible site? Should I set aside budget just for this? 

Adam Kirby: You will want to set aside a budget to create an accessible site. It is an expense. You're going to have to do a little bit more for your website in order to make sure it's successful. You're going to have to make changes. How much does it cost? That will vary and depend on where you are with your site build; if it’s an existing site, if you're launching a new site, the amount of content on your site and the variability of content types. So, unfortunately, the answer is it just depends. 

If you need help with an accessibility audit, resolving some known issues on your site, or convincing your leadership to take action on website accessibility, we’re here for you.  

Webinar Slides and Additional Resources  Website Accessibility FAQs by Mediacurrent 
Categories: Drupal

An object at rest

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 17 May 2008 - 2:03pm

So obviously, the pendulum of progress stopped swinging on my game.  As much as I tried to prevent it, pressing obligations just wouldn’t take a back seat (nor would the burglars who, a few weeks ago, stole 90% of my wardrobe and who last week stole my monitor).  So after a string of hectic weekends and even crazier weeks, this weekend has been pretty wide open for doing whatever I want to do.  And not a moment too soon!

So after doing all the other things I try to do with my weekends, I finally loaded up the ol’ Inform 7 IDE and started working on my game.  To get me back in the swing of things, so to speak, I started reading through what I’d already written.  It was an interesting experience.

Strangely, what impressed me most was stuff I had done that I have since forgotten I learned how to do.  Silly little things, like actions I defined that actually worked, that had I tried to write them today, probably would have had me stumped for a while.  Go me!  Except, erm, I seem to have forgotten more than I’ve retained.

I also realized the importance of commenting my own code.  For instance, there’s this snippet:

A thing can be attached or unattached. A thing is usually unattached. A thing that is a part of something is attached.

The problem is, I have no idea why I put it in there – it doesn’t seem relevant to anything already in the game, so I can only imagine that I had some stroke of genius that told me I was going to need it “shortly” (I probably figured I’d be writing the code the next night).  So now, there’s that lonely little line, just waiting for its purpose.  I’m sure I’ll come across it some day; for now, I’ve stuck in a comment to remind myself to stick in a comment when I do remember.

It reminds me of all the writing I did when I was younger.  I was just bursting with creativity when I was a kid, constantly writing the first few pages of what I was sure was going to be a killer story.  And then I’d misplace the notebook or get sidetracked by something else, or do any of the million other things that my easily distracted self tends to do.  Some time later, I’d come across the notebook, read the stuff I’d written and think, “Wow, this is great stuff!  Now… where was I going with it?”  And I’d never remember, or I’d remember and re-forget.  Either way, in my mother’s attic there are piles and piles of notebooks with half-formed thoughts that teem with potential never to be fulfilled.

This situation – that of wanting to resume progress but fumbling to pick up the threads of where I left off –  has me scouring my memory for a term I read in Jack London’s Call of the Wild.  There was a part in the book where Buck’s owner (it’s late, his name has escaped me) has been challenged to some sort of competition to see if Buck can get the sled moving from a dead stop.  I seem to remember that the runners were frozen to the ground.  I thought the term was “fast break” or “break fast” or something to that effect, but diligent (does 45 seconds count as diligent?) searching has not confirmed this or provided me with the right term.  Anyway, that’s how it feels tonight – I feel as if I’m trying to heave a frozen sled free from its moorings.

The upside is, I am still pleased with what I have so far.  That’s good because it means I’m very likely to continue, rather than scrap it altogether and pretend that I’ll come up with a new idea tomorrow.  In the meantime, I’ll be looking for some SnoMelt and a trusty St. Bernard to get things moving again.

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Time enough (to write) at last…

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 14 April 2008 - 3:24pm

So I didn’t get as much coding done over the weekend as I had hoped, mainly because the telephone company *finally* installed my DSL line, which meant I was up til 5:30 Saturday am catching up on the new episodes of Lost.  That, in turn, meant that most of the weekend was spent wishing I hadn’t stayed up until such an ungodly hour, and concentration just wasn’t in the cards.

However, I did get some stuff done, which is good.  Even the tiniest bit of progress counts as momentum, which is crucial for me.  If the pendulum stops swinging, it will be very hard for me to get it moving again.

So the other day, as I was going over the blog (which really is as much a tool for me as it is a way for me to share my thoughts with others), I realized I had overlooked a very basic thing when coding the whole “automatically return the frog to the fuschia” bit…

As the code stood, if the player managed to carry the frog to another room before searching it, the frog would get magically returned to the fuschia.  This was fairly simple to resolve, in the end – I just coded it so that the game moves (and reports) the frog back to fuschia before leaving the room.  I also decided to add in a different way of getting the key out of the frog – in essence, rewarding different approaches to the same problem with success.

Which brings me to the main thrust of today’s post.  I have such exacting standards for the games I play.  I love thorough implementation.  My favorite games are those that build me a cool gameworld and let me tinker and explore, poking at the shadows and pulling on the edges to see how well it holds up.  A sign of a good game is one that I will reopen not to actually play through again, but to just wander around the world, taking in my surroundings.  I’ve long lamented the fact that relatively few games make this a rewarding experience – even in the best games, even slight digging tends to turn up empty, unimplemented spots.

What I am coming to appreciate is just how much work is involved in the kind of implementation I look for.  Every time I pass through a room’s description, or add in scenery objects, I realize just how easy it is to find things to drill down into.  Where there’s a hanging plant, there’s a pot, dirt, leaves, stems, wires to hang from, hooks to hang on, etc.  Obviously, unless I had all the time in the world, I couldn’t implement each of these separately, so I take what I believe to be the accepted approach and have all of the refer to the same thing.  Which, in my opinion, is fine.  I don’t mind if a game has the same responses for the stems as it does for the plant as a whole, as long as it has some sort of relevant response.  Even so, this takes a lot of work.  It might be the obsessive part of me, but I can’t help but think “What else would a person think of when looking at a hanging plant?”

Or, as I’ve come to think of it:  WWBTD?

What Would Beta Testers Do?

I’ve taken to looking at a “fully” implemented room and wondering what a player might reasonably (and in some cases unreasonably) be expected to do.  This is a bit of a challenging process for me – I already know how my mind works, so trying to step outside of my viewpoint and see it from a blind eye is hard.   I should stop for a second to note that I fully intend to have my game beta tested once it reaches that point, but the fewer obvious things there are for testers to trip over, the more time and energy they’ll have for really digging in and trying to expose the weaknesses I can’t think of.

I’ve found one resource that is both entertaining and highly informative to me:  ClubFloyd transcripts.  ClubFloyd, for the uninitiated (a group among which I count myself, of course) is a sort of cooperative gaming experience — if anyone who knows better reads this and cares to correct what may well be a horrible description, by all means!– where people get together on the IFMud and play through an IF title.  The transcripts are both amusing and revealing.  I recently read the Lost Pig transcript and it was quite interesting.  The things people will attempt to do are both astonishing and eye-opening.  In the case of Lost Pig (which, fortunately, I had already played before reading the transcript), what was even more amazing was the depth of the game itself.  I mean, people were doing some crazy ass stuff – eating the pole, lighting pants on fire, and so on.  And it *worked*.  Not only did it work, it was reversible.  You obviously need the pole, so there’s a way to get it back if, in a fit of orc-like passion, you decide to shove it in down Grunk’s throat.

Anyway, my point is, the transcripts gave me a unique perspective on the things people will try, whether in an effort to actually play the game, to amuse themselves, or to amuse others.  Definitely good stuff to keep in mind when trying to decide, say, the different ways people will try to interact with my little porcelain frog.

Other Stuff I Accomplished

So I coded in an alternate way to deal with the frog that didn’t conflict with the “standard” approach.  I also implemented a few more scenery objects.  Over the course of the next few days, I’m going to try to at least finish the descriptions of the remaining rooms so that I can wander around a bit and start really getting to the meat of it all.  I also want to work on revising the intro text a bit.  In an effort to avoid the infodumps that I so passionately hate, I think I went a little too far and came away with something a bit too terse and uninformative.  But that’s the really fun part of all of this – writing and re-writing, polishing the prose and making it all come together.

Whattaya know.  Midnight again.  I think I’m picking up on a trend here.

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Day Nothing – *shakes fist at real life*

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 8 April 2008 - 12:13pm

Grrr… I’ve been so bogged down in work and client emergencies that progress on the game is at a temporary (no, really!  Only temporary) standstill.  I’ve managed to flesh out a few more room and scenery descriptions, but have not accomplished anything noteworthy in a few days.  Hopefully after this week most of the fires on the work front will be extinguished, and I’ll have time to dive into the game this weekend.

(She says to no one, since there’s been one hit on this blog since… it started.)

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