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Acquia: Live tutorial on using Bootstrap with Drupal today!

Planet Drupal - 9 April 2014 - 6:38am

Our old training site was looking a bit long in the tooth. It was not only Drupal 6, but also had an old Acquia design several versions behind the current main site. It was time for a major update.

Step by step tutorials

Dave Myburgh, Lead developer for Acquia.com recently gave two webinars about the experience. He shares specific tips on what modules he used to keep the development lightweight and flexible.

Categories: Drupal

Blog: Of money, games and trust

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 9 April 2014 - 3:32am

"What IS fair? What is that model to pay for games -- and game devs -- which is intrinsically ethical, honest, and rewarding towards true talent and dedication?" ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

.VDMi/Blog: Why does my file get removed after six hours?

Planet Drupal - 9 April 2014 - 12:29am
My managed image got removed after a certain amount of time. How did that happen? After searching a bit I figure out.

The Form API has a form element called managed_file. It uploads a file and adds it to the managed files table. This way Drupal has knowledge about and control over it. But now I got the situation that after a certain amount of time the image got removed. It just disappeared. What is happening here?

Well the managed_file works with Ajax. To smooth the proces it adds the managed file and leaves the status on temporary until some one specifies 'this is my file its managed'. You do that by adding this snippet of code to your submit handler.

$file = file_load($form_state['values']['file_element_name']);

// Change status to permanent.
$file->status = FILE_STATUS_PERMANENT;

// Save.
file_save($file);

If you have your form managed by

system_settings_form()

you want to add a extra submit handler. You can do that this way.

$form['#submit'][] = 'extra_admin_submit';
Categories: Drupal

Modules Unraveled: 103 Content Branching and Static Site Generation Using Zariz with Amitai Burstein - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 10:00pm
Published: Wed, 04/09/14Download this episodeZariz
  • What is Zariz?
  • How did this come about?
  • How does it help content creators?
  • How is this different from Workbench Moderation, and the default revisioning system?
  • You mentioned that it duplicates nodes, how do the URLs stay in tact?
  • Talk a bit about how you can create static site from a Drupal site.
Use Cases
  • Content staging
  • Static site generation
    • What about authenticated users?
    • How does this help performance and scalability?
Questions from Twitter
  • Kate
    Is Zariz an alternative to drupal.org/project/sps?
Video

Screencast demo starts at about 40:23

Episode Links: Amitai on drupal.orgAmitai on TwitterZariz RepoTags: 
Categories: Drupal

Fuse Interactive: Watch as I try to upgrade this module to Drupal 8. What happens next you won't BELIEVE!

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 6:05pm
Drupal 8 is coming with more API changes than ever before. Are you ready?? Prepare yourself by upgrading your first Drupal 8 module right here on the Fuse Interactive blog. Learn by doing and follow along as we explore the new Routing component, OOP Drupal, PSR autoloading... and more!
Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: Secure your infrastructure with Docker and Puppet.

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 5:10pm

I recently spoke at the Drupal Melbourne meetup about running Puppet and Docker to increase security for running multiple sites on the one host. It's alot of work to get setup properly for a remote speaker so I would like to thank the organisers for allowing me to present.

Categories: Drupal

Metal Toad: Pond Life Ep.2

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 4:09pm

Hello Everyone!
Welcome back to the pond! Last week we touched on the importance of mentoring juniors and Github best practices. In this week's episode, we'll be following up on the junior workflow from last week by discussing two tools you should definitely have and how to install them, exploring new ground by touching on some entry level SCSS techniques, sharing my AHA! and FAIL moments of the week, and lastly, our weekly query for you good people out there to ponder. So lets jump right into it shall we?

Categories: Drupal

Q& A: Hearthstone heralds new challenges for Blizzard on mobile

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 April 2014 - 12:56pm

Gamasutra sat down to chat briefly with Blizzard's Jason Chayes and Bryan Chang about the trials and triumphs they faced while developing and launching Hearthstone for iPad. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

DrupalCon Austin News: Symfony Community: A Special Invitation to DrupalCon Austin

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 12:49pm


With the rapidly approaching release of Drupal 8, many Symfony developers may be considering going to Austin for DrupalCon in June. Our advice? Do it!

Categories: Drupal

Apogee Software: When the sultans of shareware went retail

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 April 2014 - 10:50am

In this reprint from the February 1995 issue of Game Developer magazine, editor-at-large Alexander Antoniades describes Apogee Software's attempt to move beyond shareware development. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Julian Granger-Bevan: Improving SEO using Drupal Similar by Terms

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 9:00am

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) is the process of altering your website to maximise the exposure of your website via search engines such as Google and Bing.

The aim is to bring more visitors to your website.

If your website is built using the Drupal CMS, this article will give you an easy tip that will both improve the experience for your visitors when they are on your site and help boost your search engine rankings.

The method is made easy using the Similar by Terms module for Drupal, and exploits the need for visitors to be able to find other relevant content when they are on your website.

Why use Similar by Terms?

Search engines such as Google are looking at hundreds of factors when they decide which pages to display prominently in search engine results pages (SERPs).

These factors include content, quality and context.

Your site is more likely to be placed highly in SERPS (leading to more traffic) if Google identifies that it is authoritative on a particular subject. Links around between pages on your website will help Google recognise the topic that each page on your website covers, and means that it is more likely to rank highly for that searches on that topic.

Do not get confused, this is not the same as link building from other websites (for which care needs to be taken as search engines will penalise you if these are unnatural).

Similar by Terms provides an automated means of displaying related content links on your website. It does this by comparing the taxonomy terms that each node is tagged with, and creating a simple ranking based on the overlapping terms  from which it can draw the top few nodes to show to your visitors as links.

Links to relevant content also improve the experience for your visitors, by giving them suggestions for what to read next. A visitor is much more likely to find links useful (and continue to browse your website) if the links are relevant to the page that they are already on.

How to install Similar by Terms

To install Similar by Terms, download the code from http://drupal.org/project/similarterms and enable on your website by visiting the /admin/modules page.

You will need to have also installed two dependencies: Chaos Tools Suite and Views.

Similar by Terms exposes a view to your website, and the next thing you will want to do is edit this to suit your needs. The view can be found at the page /admin/structure/views.

The default view is quite basic, and simply returns a list of the titles of the related nodes. You will likely want to edit this (perhaps to also show a teaser or image from the node). These edits can be made just like any other view.

One setting that is unique to Similar by Terms is the taxonomy vocabularies that are considered when ranking nodes for similarity. You can opt to include just one, or all of your vocabularies in the comparison.

To do this, click "Advanced" on the right hand side of the edit screen, then click on "Similar By Terms: Nid" in the contextual filters section.

Now a dialog appears where you can choose which vocabularies to use.

You can also create your own views utilising the functionality provided by Similar by Terms. Simply copy the relationships and sorting rules that exist in the default view that Similar by Terms provided.

One last hint

The default behaviour of Similar By Terms will only show nodes in the list that share one or more taxonomy terms with the node being viewed.

This means, that you might only see one related node, or even none at all.

For the styling of your website you're likely to want to always show the same number of nodes in the list. Whilst there is a feature request in the issues queue for this, there is a simple method that will solve this for you straight away.

The answer is to create a new taxonomy vocabulary called "Included in Similar By Terms", with a single term called "Included". Let that term default on all nodes on your website. This way, all nodes will have at least one taxonomy term in common, and the real similar nodes will rise to the top of the list above those that aren't really related.

Category: WebsitesTags: DrupalSimilar by TermsDrupal Planetrelated contenttutorialhow to
Categories: Drupal

Acquia: Using Composer Manager to get off the Island Now

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 8:28am

On the eve of 2013, prolific Drupal contributor Larry Garfield put forth a challenge to "get off the island", and judging by the adoption of non-Drupal projects in Drupal 8 core I would say the community has responded.

Categories: Drupal

Blog: Working in the game industry - A job to die for?

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 April 2014 - 7:19am

"After worrying that my boyfriend had fallen asleep at the wheel and crashed his car, we agreed on a compromise. He'd work his 20 hours of crunch a week by staying over two nights a week at a cheap hotel." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Phase2: Say Goodbye To menu_get_object() @NYC Camp

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 4:30am

Drupal 8 is bringing some great new features in addition to some fun DX changes. One of the ways I like to learn about these changes is to deconstruct the API.

The best way to deconstruct the API is to dive into code that has a certain purpose, like looking at the Breadcrumb API.

Since we know we’re focusing on Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 changes, we can also use the excellent documentation in the change records to help us.

In my upcoming NYCCamp presentation, I’ll review some of the common API functions we used in Drupal 7 and how they’ve changed in Drupal 8.

What Node Am I On?

A lot of custom blocks that show related content, connected taxonomy, or any other relationship to currently viewed page typically depend on menu_get_object(). I’m sad to say that our old friend is gone.

In Drupal 8, the way to get details about nodes are through the attributes of the request object in the global \Drupal namespace.

While the DX of this implementation is currently being discussed, as of this writing, to get details about the current node:

<?php $node = \Drupal::request()->attributes->get('node'); ?>

drupal_render() is EVERYTHING!

Consistency is a big theme (no pun intended) in Drupal 8. Render arrays are the main driver to staging content to be passed to the theme layer.

As such, the theme() function is now gone.

Instead, a new #theme array key is passed to build a piece of content programmatically.

For old core theme functions, like theme_table() or theme_link(), you can pass in the ‘table’ or ‘link’ keyword, respectively, to the #type array key.

As noted in the change record, to create a table of data with a pager, set the various keys, then pass it to drupal_render():

<?php // Theme is available as an element type (may have additional processing in rendering). $table = array( '#type' => 'table', '#header' => $header, '#rows' => $rows, '#attributes' => array( 'id' => 'my-module-table', ), ); $markup = drupal_render($table); // Pager is not an element type, use #theme directly. $pager = array('#theme' => 'pager'); $markup = drupal_render($pager); ?>

Want More?

If you can’t make it out to NYC, definitely look for me at either the upcoming Chicago Meetup or Drupalcon Austin!

I hope to you see in you in NYC this weekend!

Categories: Drupal

Marek Sotak: Inline Manual 1.0 Drupal module released, show your clients how to use their site

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 3:03am

After few betas, Inline Manual Drupal module has reached stable 1.0 version. Throw screenshots, screencasts and word documents away! Be interactive and agile. :)

"Inline Manual is a service to create interactive, reusable and easy to maintain step-by-step documentation for end-users of a website or application. Be it a tutorial "How to add a new user" within a CMS you've just built or a tutorial showing how to manage specific content."

The Drupal module allows you to:

Categories: Drupal

KnackForge: How we managed to send 75k emails per hour

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2014 - 1:42am

Ardent team at KnackForge always loves to get hands dirty with challenging projects. In this connection we recently took an interesting newsletter sending project from one of our potential clients who is doing relatively big in Internet marketing.

In brief, we were asked for a custom system for sending out newsletter emails, based on Drupal. Tentatively 600k emails to be sent per month. A newsletter list shall have up to 80k users and limited to a couple of lists to begin with.

Categories: Drupal

Brave New World: D&D Next: World of Riv

RPGNet - 8 April 2014 - 12:00am
Introducing a new world for D&D Next.
Categories: Game Theory & Design
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