Newsfeeds

Cyberpunk 2077, exclusive Orcs Must Die 3, and many more now headed to Stadia

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 19 August 2019 - 10:49am

Google has added several new games to the lineup for Google Staida, in turn addressing some of the concerns about the cloud-based platform's library being a little light despite its coming launch. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Jacob Rockowitz: Requesting a medical appointment online begins a patient's digital journey

Planet Drupal - 19 August 2019 - 9:59am

Experience

My experience with healthcare, Drupal, and webforms

For the past 20 years, I have worked in healthcare helping Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) evolve their digital platform and patient experience. About ten years ago, I persuaded MSKCC to switch to Drupal 6, which was followed by a migration to Drupal 8. More recently, I have become the maintainer of the Webform module for Drupal 8. Now, I want to leverage my experience and expertise in healthcare, webforms, and Drupal, to start exploring how we can improve patient and caregiver’s digital experience related to online appointment requests.

It’s important that we understand the problem/challenge of requesting an appointment online, examine how hospitals are currently solving this problem, and then offer some recommendations and ways to improve existing approaches. Instead of writing one very long blog post, I’m going to break up this discussion into a series of three blog posts. This initial post is going to address the patient journey and experience around an appointment request form.

These blog posts are not Drupal-specific, but my goal is to create and share an exemplary "Request an appointment" form template for the Webform module for Drupal 8.

Improving patient and caregiver’s digital experience

Improving the patient and caregiver digital experience is a very broad, massive, and challenging topic. Personally, my goal when working with doctors, researcher, and caregivers is…

Making things "easy" for patients and caregivers in healthcare is easier said...Read More

Categories: Drupal

PUBG is rolling out console crossplay to Xbox One and PS4 this year

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 19 August 2019 - 9:06am

The team behind PlayerUnknown†™s Battlegrounds is bringing cross-platform play to its Xbox One and PlayStation 4 versions. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Using mystery as the core of marketing. - by Alejandro Maldonado

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 August 2019 - 7:41am
Yume Nikki is a very good game, but the mystery surrounding the developer, Kikiyama, was definitely of great importance for all the commercial movements around it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Kliuless #45: Esports Expands - by Kenneth Liu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 August 2019 - 7:36am
Each week I compile a gaming industry insights newsletter that I publish broadly. Opinions are mine.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The first four days of a Kickstarter - by Nic Rutherford

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 August 2019 - 7:36am
More information about the Fringe Planet Kickstarter - along with two huge mistakes I made with campaign. Blogging about this to help others avoid these mistakes
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Beginner balance versus pro balance - by Joost van Dongen

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 August 2019 - 7:33am
What to do if something is overpowered for beginners, but fine for experienced players? Simple stat changes won't do in such cases. This blogpost discusses 3 approaches to fixing beginner balance that we've used in Awesomenauts and Swords & Soldiers 2.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

NBG Currency

New Drupal Modules - 19 August 2019 - 6:57am
Categories: Drupal

New tool makes web browsing easier for the visually impaired

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 19 August 2019 - 6:30am
Researchers have developed a new voice assistant that allows people with visual impairments to get web content as quickly and as effortlessly as possible from smart speakers and similar devices.
Categories: Virtual Reality

Downtime Training

Gnome Stew - 19 August 2019 - 5:00am

As many of my close circle of friends know, I was late to play the fifth edition of the world’s greatest role playing game. It’s a long story, but the fourth edition of the game burned me badly enough, I didn’t want to risk my time, energy, and money on the next version. I have to admit that I regret this delay because I’ve been running a game of fifth edition for the past few months, and it’s been incredibly fun. However, this isn’t a review or commentary on fifth edition, but I did want to set the stage.

I have for expanding the “Training to Gain Levels” concepts in the Dungeon Master’s Guide, and I thought I’d drop them here for your consideration, consumption, and possible commentary. So here goes with the brainstorming….

 I’ve never been a huge fan of “trapping” someone at their current level. Share1Tweet1Reddit1Email

The “Training to Gain Levels” section of the DMG has a very brief segment on page 131 regarding an optional approach at training to level up. I’m glad they made it optional because I’ve never been a huge fan of “trapping” someone at their current level until they leave the adventure behind, find a nearby city, track down someone better than them, and train for a certain period of time before they can leverage what they’ve already learned “on the job” or “in the field.” It just doesn’t seem fair or right. It also interrupts the flow of the storytelling because players want (or even need) their characters to be as cool and powerful as possible while running through the storyline.

Xanathar’s Guide to Everything expands on the idea of training to allow a character to learn a language or pick up a proficiency with a tool. That’s an excellent expansion of the training concept, and I like it quite a bit. I’ll even go on record to state that I love this style of training because it improves the character by “spending” some downtime moments on it.

I am a fan of is training to gain experience points. Share1Tweet1Reddit1Email

In the level-based training, what I am a fan of is training to gain experience points. These XP can, obviously, trigger a “level up” moment if enough XP is gain. That’s where my concepts and ideas come into play. If a player simply doesn’t have anything to do with their character during a downtime segment, then I don’t mind if they run off to a trainer, expert, mentor, or some such to spend a downtime segment (and some gold) to earn a few XP.

Basing my chart on the one found in the DMG, here’s my proposal:

Current Level

Downtime Segments

Training Cost

XP Gain

1-4

1

20 gp

100 XP

5-10

2

40 gp

1250 XP

11-16

3

60 gp

2,500 XP

17-20

4

80 gp

6,500 XP

This also assumes the PC can track down someone better than them to do the teaching. As the character reaches higher tiers of play, this will become more difficult. I’m going to leverage the rarity system from the DMG for magic items, and state that trainers are going to be common, uncommon, rare, or very rare. The more difficult the trainer is to find might lead to side quests to find the trainer, or even downtime and gold spent to find the trainer. I’m going to throw out an optional table here for my optional ruleset of training. This one pertains to finding the trainer.

Current Level

Rarity

Downtime Segments

Finding Cost

1-4

Common

0 (Automatic)

0 gp

5-10

Uncommon

1

20 gp

11-16

Rare

2

40 gp

17-20

Very Rare

3

60 gp

The above table shows long it would take to find a trainer and how much in expense it would take in bribes and other expenses to track down the trainer. I’d also recommend someone who is flush with liquid funds to spend more than the base “finding cost” to reduce the downtime segments, so they can find their trainer faster. How this plays out in your game is entire up to you.

 I’m completely aware that this may create a party imbalance. Share1Tweet1Reddit1Email

I’m completely aware that this may create a party imbalance to some extent because this may allow one character to obtain one level more than the rest of the party, but they’ll also be behind the other characters in gold, renown, social contacts, and so on. I think it will even out in the long run because the XP gains from training that I’m proposing aren’t that extreme and won’t allow the higher level PC to remain at that higher plateau for too long.

Those are my ideas and approaches on training to gain experience points in fifth edition. See any gaps in the proposal? How about some ideas to use or improve on the concept? Let me know!

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Group SAML

New Drupal Modules - 19 August 2019 - 3:14am

The Group SAML (gsaml) module allows you to manage group permissions based on a selected user attribute. The module make uses of the following configurations: an array of the user attributes, an array of group roles and an array of terms. It then creates a group for each term. The combination of group's with roles creates a matrix which is filled with the strings from the user entity.

Therefore it is possible to manage user access to content and media by taxonomy term.

The configuration page can be faund in /en/admin/group/saml.

Features:

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Top 10 Drupal Accessibility Modules

Planet Drupal - 19 August 2019 - 3:09am

In this post, we'll take a look at some of the most useful modules that will help make your Drupal site more accessible to developers, content editors and users alike.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Slack Logger

New Drupal Modules - 19 August 2019 - 2:50am

This module is submodule for Slack module which allows sending error logs to your configured Slack channel.

You can configure the module, to select a minimum severity level, for example:
Configured level value is "Error", so when all logs that are at least errors (Error, Critical, Alert, Emergency), will be sent to your slack.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Low-code and no-code tools continue to drive the web forward

Planet Drupal - 19 August 2019 - 1:35am

A version of this article was originally published on Devops.com.

Twelve years ago, I wrote a post called Drupal and Eliminating Middlemen. For years, it was one of the most-read pieces on my blog. Later, I followed that up with a blog post called The Assembled Web, which remains one of the most read posts to date.

The point of both blog posts was the same: I believed that the web would move toward a model where non-technical users could assemble their own sites with little to no coding experience of their own.

This idea isn't new; no-code and low-code tools on the web have been on a 25-year long rise, starting with the first web content management systems in the early 1990s. Since then no-code and low-code solutions have had an increasing impact on the web. Examples include:

While this has been a long-run trend, I believe we're only at the beginning.

Trends driving the low-code and no-code movements

According to Forrester Wave: Low-Code Development Platforms for AD&D Professionals, Q1 2019, In our survey of global developers, 23% reported using low-code platforms in 2018, and another 22% planned to do so within a year..

Major market forces driving this trend include a talent shortage among developers, with an estimated one million computer programming jobs expected to remain unfilled by 2020 in the United States alone.

What is more, the developers who are employed are often overloaded with work and struggle with how to prioritize it all. Some of this burden could be removed by low-code and no-code tools.

In addition, the fact that technology has permeated every aspect of our lives — from our smartphones to our smart homes — has driven a desire for more people to become creators. As the founder of Product Hunt Ryan Hoover said in a blog post: As creating things on the internet becomes more accessible, more people will become makers..

But this does not only apply to individuals. Consider this: the typical large organization has to build and maintain hundreds of websites. They need to build, launch and customize these sites in days or weeks, not months. Today and in the future, marketers can embrace no-code and low-code tools to rapidly develop websites.

Abstraction drives innovation

As discussed in my middleman blog post, developers won't go away. Just as the role of the original webmaster has evolved with the advent of web content management systems, the role of web developers is changing with the rise of low-code and no-code tools.

Successful no-code approaches abstract away complexity for web development. This enables less technical people to do things that previously could only by done by developers. And when those abstractions happen, developers often move on to the next area of innovation.

When everyone is a builder, more good things will happen on the web. I was excited about this trend more than 12 years ago, and remain excited today. I'm eager to see the progress no-code and low-code solutions will bring to the web in the next decade.

Categories: Drupal

Low-code and no-code tools continue to drive the web forward

Dries Buytaert - 19 August 2019 - 1:35am

A version of this article was originally published on Devops.com.

Twelve years ago, I wrote a post called Drupal and Eliminating Middlemen. For years, it was one of the most-read pieces on my blog. Later, I followed that up with a blog post called The Assembled Web, which remains one of the most read posts to date.

The point of both blog posts was the same: I believed that the web would move toward a model where non-technical users could assemble their own sites with little to no coding experience of their own.

This idea isn't new; no-code and low-code tools on the web have been on a 25-year long rise, starting with the first web content management systems in the early 1990s. Since then no-code and low-code solutions have had an increasing impact on the web. Examples include:

While this has been a long-run trend, I believe we're only at the beginning.

Trends driving the low-code and no-code movements

According to Forrester Wave: Low-Code Development Platforms for AD&D Professionals, Q1 2019, In our survey of global developers, 23% reported using low-code platforms in 2018, and another 22% planned to do so within a year..

Major market forces driving this trend include a talent shortage among developers, with an estimated one million computer programming jobs expected to remain unfilled by 2020 in the United States alone.

What is more, the developers who are employed are often overloaded with work and struggle with how to prioritize it all. Some of this burden could be removed by low-code and no-code tools.

In addition, the fact that technology has permeated every aspect of our lives — from our smartphones to our smart homes — has driven a desire for more people to become creators. As the founder of Product Hunt Ryan Hoover said in a blog post: As creating things on the internet becomes more accessible, more people will become makers..

But this does not only apply to individuals. Consider this: the typical large organization has to build and maintain hundreds of websites. They need to build, launch and customize these sites in days or weeks, not months. Today and in the future, marketers can embrace no-code and low-code tools to rapidly develop websites.

Abstraction drives innovation

As discussed in my middleman blog post, developers won't go away. Just as the role of the original webmaster (FTP hand-written HTML files, anyone?) has evolved with the advent of web content management systems, the role of web developers is changing with the rise of low-code and no-code tools.

Successful no-code approaches abstract away complexity for web development. This enables less technical people to do things that previously could only be done by developers. And when those abstractions happen, developers often move on to the next area of innovation.

When everyone is a builder, more good things will happen on the web. I was excited about this trend more than 12 years ago, and remain excited today. I'm eager to see the progress no-code and low-code solutions will bring to the web in the next decade.

Categories: Drupal

Amazon Elastic Transcoder and AWS Lambda

New Drupal Modules - 19 August 2019 - 1:27am

This module is provide all functionality for Amazon Elastic Transcoder and AWS Lambda in Drupal 8.

Currently In development mood.

Categories: Drupal

Fuzzy Thinking: Top Ten Rejected 1st Ed. AD&D Module Titles

RPGNet - 19 August 2019 - 12:00am
The Goat Tower of Inverness?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Designing communities for kindness

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 18 August 2019 - 11:51pm

How to better set up your game communities for kinder user experiences. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Amazon Elastic Transcoder Move

New Drupal Modules - 18 August 2019 - 11:23pm

This module is move at new location:

https://www.drupal.org/project/aetl
Categories: Drupal

Video Game Deep Cuts: Dicey Dungeons Gets Rad, Patreon Follows

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 18 August 2019 - 7:36am

This week's roundup includes looks at standout new titles including Dicey Dungeons and Rad, an analysis of Patreon as incremental funding, & lots more. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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