Newsfeeds

Game Boy Geek Season 6 Kickstarter Running Now

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 February 2018 - 9:00am
Game Boy Geek is looking to create a 6th season of their show. Their mission is to help you find the next board game you’ll love. As part of the campaign, you can get cool tchotchkes based on the show, but you can also get some extras for a whole bunch of different board and […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

IDW Games and Taberna Jogos Announces Galaxy Hunters

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 February 2018 - 8:00am
Giant robot alert! We have giant robot alert! Try and keep calm! IDW Games has announced they’re teaming up with Taberna Jogo to bring us Galaxy Hunters. The game is a worker-placement style game (which I love) with giant robots (which I also love). So you know I’ll be paying attention to where this one’s […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Flash Games Aren’t Dead, They’re Just In A Coma - by Thomas Brush

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 February 2018 - 7:45am
In 2016, Kickstarter resoundingly supported my game about a minister in Hell, and raised over $100,000. So you can imagine how excited and nervous I am about my next Kickstarter campaign, the sequel to my first Flash about a boy named Pete in a coma.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

A Look Back at 2017 Game Industry [Report] - by Mantin Lu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 February 2018 - 7:44am
This article wraps up 2017 Global Game Industry and I provided my thoughts about what actions to take in 2018.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Discussing the "Fast Burn" Syndrome of Indie Development - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 February 2018 - 7:44am
Today's post looks at a common phenomenon that can rear its head after the first big success of your studio, it's the allure to go big and could lead to you burning out of game development.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Creating 2D Particle Effects in Unity3D - by David Finseth

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 16 February 2018 - 7:39am
Technical Artist David Finseth of Synapse Games explains how the particle effects in "Spellstone" and "Animation Throwdown" were created in Unity3D.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Wyrd Previews Twisted Horrors For The Other Side

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 February 2018 - 7:01am
Well, I mean, I realize we just passed Valentine’s Day, but the vibe I’m getting from the new The Other Side preview from Wyrd is decidedly more Halloween. You know, I bet it’s a real pain when you get something stuck in your eye that’s in the middle of your back. That’s gotta be annoying. […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Eldritch Horror: Masks of Nyarlathotep Now Available

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 February 2018 - 7:00am
For all the dangers in the modern world, we all know that the true evil is in the form of… Ancient Egypt! *Imperial March plays* The Investigators must get together once more in order to stop this ancient evil from taking over the everyday world. That’s what you’ll be doing in Masks of Nyarlathotep, the […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

New Imperial Fists Available To Order From Forge World

Tabletop Gaming News - 16 February 2018 - 6:00am
The Imperial Fists are siege masters. They can topple any structure. And the fortifications they, themselves, make are some of the strongest in the galaxy. Forge World is cranking out new Imperial Fists figures. You’ve seen the Rogal Dorn, but they’ve added honor guard and others like that over in their webshop. From the website: […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drop Guard: Feature-February: What changed in Drop Guard?

Planet Drupal - 16 February 2018 - 3:00am
Feature-February: What changed in Drop Guard?

Hello everybody! You might've experienced some changes of the project settings interface already - here’s the broad summary of what makes Drop Guard more efficient and more powerful now: composer package manager mode, speeding up the setup of update type behaviors (with a short mode option) and live site monitoring.

 

Drupal 8 Composer Drupal Planet Drupal features Drop Guard announcements
Categories: Drupal

Troy’s Crock Pot: Assembling a player’s dice box

Gnome Stew - 16 February 2018 - 3:00am

A goal for the new year was to assemble a portable player’s dice box, with the conceit that it look like a tome or spellbook.

While I do enjoy crafting and painting—and I still have the option of decorating it with a design of my own—I am content, for now,  to use what I found.

(I had several inspirations for my dice box. I recommend checking out the D&D Alchemy Dice Box Tutorial by Maladroit Marcy on YouTube as one of the best. She gives her box cover the full Mod Podge treatment!)

Most of these are objects I found at the local craft store or supplemented with my own supply.

Step 1: Select a false book box

These are nifty little bookcase hidey-holes—boxes in the shapes of books. They are often displayed on the coffee table and hold a crossword puzzle book and assorted pens, or even the TV remote control.

The key was to find a box wide and long enough to accommodate other boxes for nesting—my alternative solution to creating sub-compartments within. The one I selected was 7.5 inches wide, 10.5 inches long and had an internal compartment 2.45 inches deep.  It had a magnetic clasp to hold the cover, which had the design of an old-world map.

The first thing I did was apply a new bottom to the inner layer of the box, a thin brown foam over the interior felt—mainly to ensure even rolls of the dice and to muffle the hollow clatter of dice on wood without sacrificing “dice bounce.”

Step 2: Potion of Healing

This little nifty craft has been making the rounds in D&D circles, Pinterest and other places, and I certainly wanted one included in my player box. It involves a glass bottle or vial with a cork stopper and contains the d4s needed for rolling a dose. With a handcrafted label and a dab of glue, I had my first component for the box.

Step 3: Dice box

Next, I found a little latch case that could hold a set of polyhedral dice. I put foam in the bottom, so it could double as a dice roller, too.

Step 4: Miniature box

A small keepsake box in the form of a treasure chest was the perfect size to hold a 25 mm miniature to represent my player character. Again, I added a layer of foam because this box did not have a felt interior.

Step. 5: Journal

I got lucky in that I snagged a small sketch journal that would nestle in the remaining space. This book could serve as a record of the PCs, be a place to record spells, even allow in-game notes or maps.

Step 6: Foam interior

To ensure that the items didn’t rattle against one another, I cut out sections of the foam so the tiny chest and the potion bottle would fit snugly. I think I added another piece of foam the size of the journal to elevate it to the top of the box. On the underside of that piece of foam I cut a slice where I can tuck a small pencil and a dry erase marker.

Step 7: Metal plate

On the interior felt of the lid I added one more touch: A thin metal plate. This surface can take dry-erase marker and be wiped clean.  I can use it to make in-game notations, such as tallies for hit point damage, recording initiative rolls and jotting down spells used.

Warning on price: I kept the entirety of my purchase under $35, but I timed my shopping by going on a day with deep discounts on the boxes and I had a coupon I could use, too. Shopping at list price might double your outlay.

 

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Dries Buytaert: My POSSE plan for evolving my site

Planet Drupal - 16 February 2018 - 1:23am

In an effort to reclaim my blog as my thought space and take back control over my data, I want to share how I plan to evolve my website. Given the incredible feedback on my previous blog posts, I want to continue to conversation and ask for feedback.

First, I need to find a way to combine longer blog posts and status updates on one site:

  1. Update my site navigation menu to include sections for "Blog" and "Notes". The "Notes" section would resemble a Twitter or Facebook livestream that catalogs short status updates, replies, interesting links, photos and more. Instead of posting these on third-party social media sites, I want to post them on my site first (POSSE). The "Blog" section would continue to feature longer, more in-depth blog posts. The front page of my website will combine both blog posts and notes in one stream.
  2. Add support for Webmention, a web standard for tracking comments, likes, reposts and other rich interactions across the web. This way, when users retweet a post on Twitter or cite a blog post, mentions are tracked on my own website.
  3. Automatically syndicate to 3rd party services, such as syndicating photo posts to Facebook and Instagram or syndicating quick Drupal updates to Twitter. To start, I can do this manually, but it would be nice to automate this process over time.
  4. Streamline the ability to post updates from my phone. Sharing photos or updates in real-time only becomes a habit if you can publish something in 30 seconds or less. It's why I use Facebook and Twitter often. I'd like to explore building a simple iOS application to remove any friction from posting updates on the go.
  5. Streamline the ability to share other people's content. I'd like to create a browser extension to share interesting links along with some commentary. I'm a small investor in Buffer, a social media management platform, and I use their tool often. Buffer makes it incredibly easy to share interesting articles on social media, without having to actually open any social media sites. I'd like to be able to share articles on my blog that way.

Second, as I begin to introduce a larger variety of content to my site, I'd like to find a way for readers to filter content:

  1. Expand the site navigation so readers can filter by topic. If you want to read about Drupal, click "Drupal". If you just want to see some of my photos, click "Photos".
  2. Allow people to subscribe by interests. Drupal 8 make it easy to offer an RSS feed by topic. However, it doesn't look nearly as easy to allow email subscribers to receive updates by interest. Mailchimp's RSS-to-email feature, my current mailing list solution, doesn't seem to support this and neither do the obvious alternatives.

Implementing this plan is going to take me some time, especially because it's hard to prioritize this over other things. Some of the steps I've outlined are easy to implement thanks to the fact that I use Drupal. For example, creating new content types for the "Notes" section, adding new RSS feeds and integrating "Blogs" and "Notes" into one stream on my homepage are all easy – I should be able to get those done my next free evening. Other steps, like building an iPhone application, building a browser extension, or figuring out how to filter email subscriptions by topics are going to take more time. Setting up my POSSE system is a nice personal challenge for 2018. I'll keep you posted on my progress – much of that might happen via short status updates, rather than on the main blog. ;)

Categories: Drupal

My POSSE plan for evolving my site

Dries Buytaert - 16 February 2018 - 1:23am

In an effort to reclaim my blog as my thought space and take back control over my data, I want to share how I plan to evolve my website. Given the incredible feedback on my previous blog posts, I want to continue the conversation and ask for feedback.

First, I need to find a way to combine longer blog posts and status updates on one site:

  1. Update my site navigation menu to include sections for "Blog" and "Notes". The "Notes" section would resemble a Twitter or Facebook livestream that catalogs short status updates, replies, interesting links, photos and more. Instead of posting these on third-party social media sites, I want to post them on my site first (POSSE). The "Blog" section would continue to feature longer, more in-depth blog posts. The front page of my website will combine both blog posts and notes in one stream.
  2. Add support for Webmention, a web standard for tracking comments, likes, reposts and other rich interactions across the web. This way, when users retweet a post on Twitter or cite a blog post, mentions are tracked on my own website.
  3. Automatically syndicate to 3rd party services, such as syndicating photo posts to Facebook and Instagram or syndicating quick Drupal updates to Twitter. To start, I can do this manually, but it would be nice to automate this process over time.
  4. Streamline the ability to post updates from my phone. Sharing photos or updates in real-time only becomes a habit if you can publish something in 30 seconds or less. It's why I use Facebook and Twitter often. I'd like to explore building a simple iOS application to remove any friction from posting updates on the go.
  5. Streamline the ability to share other people's content. I'd like to create a browser extension to share interesting links along with some commentary. I'm a small investor in Buffer, a social media management platform, and I use their tool often. Buffer makes it incredibly easy to share interesting articles on social media, without having to actually open any social media sites. I'd like to be able to share articles on my blog that way.

Second, as I begin to introduce a larger variety of content to my site, I'd like to find a way for readers to filter content:

  1. Expand the site navigation so readers can filter by topic. If you want to read about Drupal, click "Drupal". If you just want to see some of my photos, click "Photos".
  2. Allow people to subscribe by interests. Drupal 8 make it easy to offer an RSS feed by topic. However, it doesn't look nearly as easy to allow email subscribers to receive updates by interest. Mailchimp's RSS-to-email feature, my current mailing list solution, doesn't seem to support this and neither do the obvious alternatives.

Implementing this plan is going to take me some time, especially because it's hard to prioritize this over other things. Some of the steps I've outlined are easy to implement thanks to the fact that I use Drupal. For example, creating new content types for the "Notes" section, adding new RSS feeds and integrating "Blogs" and "Notes" into one stream on my homepage are all easy – I should be able to get those done my next free evening. Other steps, like building an iPhone application, building a browser extension, or figuring out how to filter email subscriptions by topics are going to take more time. Setting up my POSSE system is a nice personal challenge for 2018. I'll keep you posted on my progress – much of that might happen via short status updates, rather than on the main blog. ;)

Categories: Drupal

Gizra.com: Travis - The Need for Speed

Planet Drupal - 15 February 2018 - 10:00pm

Chances are that you already use Travis or another cool CI to execute your tests, and everyone politely waits for the CI checks before even thinking about merging, right? More likely, waiting your turn becomes a pain and you click on the merge: it’s a trivial change and you need it now. If this happens often, then it’s the responsibility of those who worked on those scripts that Travis crunches to make some changes. There are some trivial and not so trivial options to make the team always be willing to wait for the completion.

This blog post is for you if you have a project with Travis integration, and you’d like to maintain and optimize it, or just curious what’s possible. Users of other CI tools, keep reading, many areas may apply in your case too.

Unlike other performance optimization areas, doing before-after benchmarks is not so crucial, as Travis mostly collects the data, you just have to make sure to do the math and present the numbers proudly.

Caching

To start, if your .travis.yml lacks the cache: directive, then you might start in the easiest place: caching dependencies. For a Drupal-based project, it’s a good idea to think about caching all the modules and libraries that must be downloaded to build the project (it uses a buildsystem, doesn’t it?). So even a variant of:

cache: directories: - $HOME/.composer/cache/files

or for Drush

cache: directories: - $HOME/.drush/cache

It’s explained well in the verbose documentation at Travis-ci.com. Before your script is executed, Travis populates the cache directories automatically from a successful previous build. If your project has only a few packages, it won’t help much, and actually it can make things even slower. What’s critical is that we need to cache slow-to-generate, easy-to-download materials. Caching a large ZIP file would not make sense for example, caching many small ones from multiple origin servers would be more beneficial.

From this point, you could just read the standard documentation instead of this blog post, but we also have icing on the cake for you. A Drupal installation can take several minutes, initializing all the modules, executing the logic of the install profile and so on. Travis is kind enough to provide a bird’s-eye view on what eats up build time:

Execution speed measurements built in the log

Mind the bottleneck when making a decision on what to cache and how.

For us, it means cache of the installed, initialized Drupal database and the full document root. Cache invalidation is hard, we can’t change that, but it turned out to be a good compromise between complexity and execution speed gain, check our examples:

Do your homework and cache what’s the most resource-consuming to generate, SQL database, built source code or compiled binary, Travis is here to assist with that.

Software Versions

There are two reasons to pay attention to software versions.

Use Pre-installed Versions

Travis uses containers of different distributions, let’s say you use trusty, the default one these days, then if you choose PHP 7.0.7, it’s pre-installled, in case of 7.1, it’s needed to fetch separately and that takes time for every single build. When you have production constraints, that’s almost certainly more important to match, but in some cases, using the pre-installed version can speed things up.

And moreover, let’s say you prefer MariaDB over MySQL, then do not sudo and start to install it with the package manager, as there is the add-on system to make it available. The same goes for Google Chrome, and so on. Stick to what’s inside the image already if you can. Exploit that possibility of what Travis can fetch via the YML definition!

Use the Latest and (or) Greatest

If you ever read an article about the performance gain from migrating to PHP 7, you sense the importance of selecting the versions carefully. If your build is PHP-execution heavy, fetching PHP 7.2 (it’s another leap, but mind the backward incompatibilities) could totally make sense and it’s as easy as can be after making your code compatible:

language: php php: - '7.2'

Almost certainly, a similar thing could be written about Node.js, or relational databases, etc. If you know what’s the bottleneck in your build and find the best performing versions – newer or older – it will improve your speed. Does that conflict with the previous point about pre-installed versions? Not really, just measure which one helps your build the most!

Make it Parallel

When a Travis job is running, 2 cores and 4 GBytes of RAM is available – that’s something to rely on! Downloading packages should happen in parallel. drush make, gulp and other tools like that might use it out of the box: check your parameters and configfiles. However, on the higher level, let’s say you’d like to execute a unit test and a browser-based test, as well. You can ask Travis to spin up two (or more) containers concurrently. In the first, you can install the unit testing dependencies and execute it; then the second one can take care of only the functional test. We have a fine-grained example of this approach in our Drupal-Elm Starter, where 7 containers are used for various testing and linting. In addition to the great execution speed reduction, the benefit is that the result is also more fine-grained, instead of having a single boolean value, just by checking the build, you have an overview what can be broken.

All in all, it’s a warm fuzzy feeling that Travis is happy to create so many containers for your humble project:

If it's independent, no need to serialize the execution Utilize RAM

The available memory is currently between 4 and 7.5 GBytes , depending on the configuration, and it should be used as much as possible. One example could be to move the database main working directory to a memory-based filesystem. For many simpler projects, that’s absolutely doable and at least for Drupal, a solid speedup. Needless to say, we have an example and on client projects, we saw 15-30% improvement at SimpleTest execution. For traditional RMDBS, you can give it a try. If your DB cannot fit in memory, you can still ask InnoDB to fill memory.

Think about your use case – even moving the whole document root there could be legitimate. Also if you need to compile a source code, doing it there makes sense as well.

Build Your Own Docker Image

If your project is really exotic or a legacy one, it potentially makes sense to maintain your own Docker image and then download and execute it in Travis. We did it in the past and then converted. Maintaining your image means recurring effort, fighting with outdated versions, unavailable dependencies, that’s what to expect. Still, even it could be a type of performance optimization if you have lots of software dependencies that are hard to install on the current Travis container images.

+1 - Debug with Ease

To work on various improvements in the Travis integration for your projects, it’s a must to spot issues quickly. What worked on localhost, might or might not work on Travis – and you should know the root cause quickly.

In the past, we propagated video recording, now I’d recommend something else. You have a web application, for all the backend errors, there’s a tool to access the logs, at Drupal, you can use Drush. But what about the frontend? Headless Chrome is neat, it has built-in debugging capability, the best of which is that you can break out of the box using Ngrok. Without any X11 forwarding (which is not available) or a local hack to try to mimic Travis, you can play with your app running in the Travis environment. All you need to do is to execute a Debug build, execute the installation part (travis_run_before_install, travis_run_install, travis_run_before_script), start Headless Chrome (google-chrome --headless --remote-debugging-port=9222), download Ngrok, start a tunnel (ngrok http 9222), visit the exposed URL from your local Chrome and have fun with inspection, debugger console, and more.

Takeaway

Working on such improvements has benefits of many kinds. The entire development team can enjoy the shorter queues and faster merges, and you can go ahead and apply part of the enhancements to your local environment, especially if you dig deep into database performance optimization and make the things parallel. And even more, clients love to hear that you are going to speed up their sites, as this mindset should be also used at production.

Continue reading…

Categories: Drupal

REST Password Request

New Drupal Modules - 15 February 2018 - 6:26pm

New Rest Plugin to use REST for forgot Password Request.

We could not find a way that core Rest could send a password retrieval link via Rest resource.

This simply ads a resource to allow A New POST Request to
endpoint "/user/lost-password:"

with the key of "mail" (and optional "lang" for localization )

To Set up:

Please install Rest UI, then install the module in the normal way... then in rest ui -> find "Lost password" and enable.

Categories: Drupal

GrapesJS

New Drupal Modules - 15 February 2018 - 5:36pm
Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Time to move forward?

Planet Drupal - 15 February 2018 - 4:10pm
When is the right time to let it go and move forward? Yes, we are talking about migrating to Drupal 8 version. Drupal 8 was released in November 2015, so it has been more than two years now. No matter what kind of website you have, whether you have an online shop, small brochure website or an extensive and complex website, if its build on Drupal 6, it's almost urgent you move forward and upgrade it to Drupal 8. Why? The Drupal community no longer (officially) supports Drupal 6 since three months after Drupal 8 came out. That means that bugs are no longer getting fixed. Drupal 6 is simply long… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Osprey Games Announces Wildlands Miniatures Board Game

Tabletop Gaming News - 15 February 2018 - 3:00pm
Osprey Games is working on their first miniatures board game. It’s called Martin Wallace’s Wildlands (but everyone can play, not just him). Players will team up and compete against each-other, each team trying to reclaim the glory of what had been a mighty kingdom, but is now just the wildlands. Defeat enemy characters, gather resources, […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Game Nite Magazine Issue 21 Now Available

Tabletop Gaming News - 15 February 2018 - 2:00pm
When you want to fill up your day with gaming, a gaming magazine is hard to beat. Filled with great articles on all sorts of topics, they can keep you interested for hours. In this instance, it’s Game Nite magazine. Issue 21 is now available for your downloading and reading pleasure. It’s free, so there’s […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Acro Media: Drupal Commerce 2: How to Add and Modify Product Content

Planet Drupal - 15 February 2018 - 1:13pm

In part one  and two of this Acro Media Tech Talk video series, we covered how you set up a new product attribute and used rendered fields, in Drupal Commerce 2. Parts three and four then to set up a product variation type and a product type, both with custom fields. This completes our new product configuration.

In part five, the last of this series, we'll finally get to try out the new product! We'll add a product to the store as if we are a store administrators (end user) who is creating content. We'll try out all of the fields and properties we've configured, make a product, and view it on the site. Afterwards, we'll cover how an administrator can then go in and edit the product to make content changes.

This entire video series, parts one through five, show you how to set up a new product in Drupal Commerce 2, from start to finish. The video is captured using our Urban Hipster Commerce 2 demo site.

Its important to note that this video was recorded before the official 2.0 release of Drupal Commerce and so you may see a few small differences between this video and the official release now available.

Urban Hipster Commerce 2 Demo site

This video was created using the Urban Hipster Commerce 2 demo site. We've built this site to show the adaptability of the Drupal 8, Commerce 2 platform. Most of what you see is out-of-the-box functionality combined with expert configuration and theming.

More from Acro Media Drupal modules used in this video

Categories: Drupal

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