Dries Buytaert

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Build and operate your own CDN

22 February 2018 - 2:31pm

Janos Pasztor built his own Content Delivery Network. While I wouldn't want to operate my own personal CDN, it does sounds like a fun project for those interested in web performance.

Categories: Drupal

A Drupal distribution configurator

22 February 2018 - 2:11pm

Today, Commerce Guys shared a new initiative for Drupal Commerce. They launched a "Drupal Commerce distribution configurator": a web-based UI that generates a composer.json file and builds a version of Drupal Commerce that is tailored to an evaluator's needs. The ability to visually configure your own distribution or demo is appealing. I like the idea of a Drupal distribution configurator for at least three reasons: (1) its development could lead to improvements to Drupal's Composer-based workflow, which would benefit all of Drupal, (2) it could help make distributions easier to build and maintain, which is something I'm passionate about, and last but not least, (3) it could grow into a more polished Drupal evaluator tool.

Categories: Drupal

Twenty years later and I am still at my desk learning CSS

19 February 2018 - 1:24pm

I was working on my POSSE plan when Vanessa called and asked if I wanted to meet for a coffee. Of course, I said yes. In the car ride over, I was thinking about how I made my first website over twenty years ago. HTML table layouts were still cool and it wasn't clear if CSS was going to be widely adopted. I decided to learn CSS anyway. More than twenty years later, the workflows, the automated toolchains, and the development methods have become increasingly powerful, but also a lot more complex. Today, you simply npm your webpack via grunt with vue babel or bower to react asdfjkl;lkdhgxdlciuhw. Everything is different now, except that I'm still at my desk learning CSS.

Categories: Drupal

Get your HTTPS on

19 February 2018 - 10:26am

"Get your HTTPS on" because Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as "not secure" starting in July 2018. Chrome currently displays a neutral icon for sites that aren't using HTTPS, but starting with Chrome 68, the browser will warn users in the address bar.

Fortunately, HTTPS has become easier to implement through services like Let's Encrypt, who provide free certificates and aim to eliminate to complexity of setting up and maintaining HTTPS encryption.

Categories: Drupal

My POSSE plan for evolving my site

16 February 2018 - 1:23am

In an effort to reclaim my blog as my thought space and take back control over my data, I want to share how I plan to evolve my website. Given the incredible feedback on my previous blog posts, I want to continue the conversation and ask for feedback.

First, I need to find a way to combine longer blog posts and status updates on one site:

  1. Update my site navigation menu to include sections for "Blog" and "Notes". The "Notes" section would resemble a Twitter or Facebook livestream that catalogs short status updates, replies, interesting links, photos and more. Instead of posting these on third-party social media sites, I want to post them on my site first (POSSE). The "Blog" section would continue to feature longer, more in-depth blog posts. The front page of my website will combine both blog posts and notes in one stream.
  2. Add support for Webmention, a web standard for tracking comments, likes, reposts and other rich interactions across the web. This way, when users retweet a post on Twitter or cite a blog post, mentions are tracked on my own website.
  3. Automatically syndicate to 3rd party services, such as syndicating photo posts to Facebook and Instagram or syndicating quick Drupal updates to Twitter. To start, I can do this manually, but it would be nice to automate this process over time.
  4. Streamline the ability to post updates from my phone. Sharing photos or updates in real-time only becomes a habit if you can publish something in 30 seconds or less. It's why I use Facebook and Twitter often. I'd like to explore building a simple iOS application to remove any friction from posting updates on the go.
  5. Streamline the ability to share other people's content. I'd like to create a browser extension to share interesting links along with some commentary. I'm a small investor in Buffer, a social media management platform, and I use their tool often. Buffer makes it incredibly easy to share interesting articles on social media, without having to actually open any social media sites. I'd like to be able to share articles on my blog that way.

Second, as I begin to introduce a larger variety of content to my site, I'd like to find a way for readers to filter content:

  1. Expand the site navigation so readers can filter by topic. If you want to read about Drupal, click "Drupal". If you just want to see some of my photos, click "Photos".
  2. Allow people to subscribe by interests. Drupal 8 make it easy to offer an RSS feed by topic. However, it doesn't look nearly as easy to allow email subscribers to receive updates by interest. Mailchimp's RSS-to-email feature, my current mailing list solution, doesn't seem to support this and neither do the obvious alternatives.

Implementing this plan is going to take me some time, especially because it's hard to prioritize this over other things. Some of the steps I've outlined are easy to implement thanks to the fact that I use Drupal. For example, creating new content types for the "Notes" section, adding new RSS feeds and integrating "Blogs" and "Notes" into one stream on my homepage are all easy – I should be able to get those done my next free evening. Other steps, like building an iPhone application, building a browser extension, or figuring out how to filter email subscriptions by topics are going to take more time. Setting up my POSSE system is a nice personal challenge for 2018. I'll keep you posted on my progress – much of that might happen via short status updates, rather than on the main blog. ;)

Categories: Drupal

Reclaiming my blog as my thought space

14 February 2018 - 5:33am

Last week, I shared my frustration with using social media websites like Facebook or Twitter as my primary platform for sharing photos and status updates. As an advocate of the open web, this has bothered me for some time so I made a commitment to prioritize publishing photos, updates and more to my own site.

I'm excited to share my plan for how I'd like to accomplish this, but before I do, I'd like to share two additional challenges I face on my blog. These struggles factor into some of the changes I'm considering implementing, so I feel compelled to share them with you.

First, I've struggled to cover a wide variety of topics lately. I've been primarily writing about Drupal, Acquia and the Open Web. However, I'm also interested in sharing insights on startups, investing, travel, photography and life outside of work. I often feel inspired to write about these topics, but over the years I've grown reluctant to expand outside of professional interests. My blog is primarily read by technology professionals — from Drupal users and developers, to industry analysts and technology leaders — and in my mind, they do not read my blog to learn about a wider range of topics. I'm conflicted because I would like my l blog to reflect both my personal and professional interests.

Secondly, I've been hesitant to share short updates, such as a two sentence announcement about a new Drupal feature or an Acquia milestone. I used to publish these kinds of short updates quite frequently. It's not that I don't want to share them anymore, it's that I struggle to post them. Every time I publish a new post, it goes out to more than 5,000 people that subscribe to my blog by email. I've been reluctant to share short status updates because I don't want to flood people's inbox.

Throughout the years, I worked around these two struggles by relying on social media; while I used my blog for in-depth blog posts specific to my professional life, I used social media for short updates, sharing photos and starting conversation about wider variety of topics.

But I never loved this division.

I've always written for myself, first. Writing pushes me to think, and it is the process I rely on to flesh out ideas. This blog is my space to think out loud, and to start conversations with people considering the same problems, opportunities or ideas. In the early days of my blog, I never considered restricting my blog to certain topics or making it fit specific editorial standards.

Om Malik published a blog last week that echoes my frustration. For Malik, blogs are thought spaces: a place for writers to share original opinions that reflect "how they view the world and how they are thinking". As my blog has grown, it has evolved, and along the way it has become less of a public thought space.

My commitment to implementing a POSSE approach on my site has brought these struggles to the forefront. I'm glad it did because it requires me to rethink my approach and to return to my blogging roots. After some consideration, here is what I want to do:

  1. Take back control of more of my data; I want to share more of my photos and social media data on my own site.
  2. Find a way to combine longer in-depth blog posts and shorter status updates.
  3. Enable readers and subscribers to filter content based on their own interests so that I can cover a larger variety of topics.

In my next blog post, I plan to outline more details of how I'd like to approach this. Stay tuned!

Categories: Drupal

To PESOS or to POSSE?

6 February 2018 - 1:43am

Yesterday I shared that I uninstalled the Facebook application from my phone. My friend Simon Surtees was quick to text me: "I for one am pleased you have left Facebook. Less Cayman Island pictures!". Not too fast Simon. I never said that I left Facebook or that I'd stop posting on Facebook. Plus, I'll have more Cayman Islands pictures to share soon. :)

As a majority of my friends and family communicate on Facebook and Twitter, I still want to share updates on social media. However, I believe I can do it in a more thoughtful manner that allows me to take back control over my own data. There are a couple of ways I could go about that:

  • I could share my status updates and photos on a service like Facebook or Twitter and then automatically download and publish them to my website.
  • I could publish my status updates and photos on my website first, and then programmatically share them on Facebook, Twitter, etc.

The IndieWeb movement has provided two clever names for these models:

  1. PESOS or Publish Elsewhere, Syndicate (to your) Own Site is a model where publishing begins on third party services, such as Facebook, and then copies can be syndicated to your own site.
  2. POSSE or Publish (on your) Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere is a publishing model that begins with posting content on your own site first, then syndicating out copies to third party services.


Here is the potential impact of each approach:

PESOS POSSE Dependence A 3rd party is a required intermediary within the PESOS approach. When the 3rd party platform is down or disappears completely, publishers lose their ability to post new content or retrieve old content. No dependence, as the 3rd party service is an optional endpoint, not a required intermediary. Canonical Non-canonical: the data on the 3rd party is the original and copies on your domain may have to cite 3rd party URLs. Canonical: you have full control over URLs and host the original data. The 3rd party could cite the original URL. Quality Pulling data from 3rd parties services could reduce its quality. For example, images could be degraded or downsized. Full control over the quality of assets on your own site. Ease of use, implementation and maintenance 3rd party platforms make it really easy for users to publish content and you can still benefit from that. For example, you can easily upload images from your phone. The complexity inherent to the PESOS approach includes developing an infrastructure to curate archival copies to your own domain. The POSSE strategy can be significantly more work for the site owner, especially if you want comparable ease of use to 3rd party platforms. A higher level of technical expertise and time investment is likely required.

The goal of this analysis was to understand the pros and cons of how I can own my own content on https://dri.es. While PESOS would be much easier to implement, I decided to go with POSSE. My next step is to figure out my "POSSE plan"; how to quickly and easily share status updates on my Drupal site, how to syndicate them to 3rd party services, how to re-organize my mailing list and my RSS feed, and more. If you have any experience with implementing POSSE, feel free to share your takeaways in the comments.

Categories: Drupal

Taking control of my data and social media

5 February 2018 - 1:34am
© Andrei Lacatusu

Earlier this month, I set a resolution to blog more and use social media less. While I still need to work on blogging more, I'm certainly spending less time on Facebook. I'm halfway there. So far, only my mom has complained about me spending less time on Facebook.

This morning when my alarm woke me up at 4:45am, I took it a step further. Most mornings, I spend ten minutes checking Facebook on my phone. Today, however, I deleted the Facebook application from my phone, rolled out of bed and started my workday. Great!

As an advocate for the open web, I've written a lot about the problems that Facebook and other walled gardens pose. While I have helped raise awareness and have contributed time and money to winning back the open web, I haven't fully embraced the philosophy on my own site. For over 12 years, I've blogged on my own domain and have used Open Source software instead of using a third party service like Blogger or Medium, but I can't say the same about sharing my photos or social media updates. This has bothered me for some time.

I felt even more motivated to make a change after watching David Letterman's new Netflix series. During a conversation with his first guest, President Obama, Letterman shared the fear that his son will one day ask, "Wait a minute. You knew this was a problem, and you didn't do anything about it?". Letterman's sentiment mirrors Jeff Bezos' regret minimization framework; when you look back on your life, you want to minimize the number of regrets you have. It's a principle I like to live by.

We can't have a handful of large platform companies like Facebook control what people read on the web; their impact on democracy and society is concerning. Even Facebook doesn't like what it sees when it looks in the mirror.

Today is not only the day I uninstalled Facebook from my phone, but it's the day I fully embrace and extend my new year's resolution. Not only would I like to use social media less, I want to take back control over my social media, photos and more. I also want to contribute more to the open web in the process — it will be a worthwhile personal challenge for 2018.

Categories: Drupal

Building bikes for the Boys and Girls Club

2 February 2018 - 10:53am

Throughout the years, the team at Acquia has heard me talk about doing well and doing good. We've embedded this philosophy into Acquia's culture since we started the company. As a result, one of Acquia's core values is to "give back more".

The "give back more" principle recognizes that Acquia was born from community. We cherish our open source roots and contribute both time and talent to strengthen our communities. This means not only contributing to the open source communities that we are part of, but our local communities as well.

This week our global sales and marketing teams came together for a week of strategic planning and training. For one of our team building activities, we built 60 bikes for the children of the Boys and Girls Club of Boston! We felt that this was a special way to strengthen our team, in addition to being a great opportunity to give back.

The next day, five children from the Boys and Girls Club came to pick up their bikes in our closing session. It was very touching — a lot of our team got teary eyed. It made me very proud of what we were able to accomplish for our local community. I'm excited to continue to "give back more" in 2018.

Categories: Drupal

Happy seventeenth birthday Drupal

15 January 2018 - 7:52am

Seventeen years ago today, I open-sourced the software behind Drop.org and released Drupal 1.0.0. When Drupal was first founded, Google was in its infancy, the mobile web didn't exist, and JavaScript was a very unpopular word among developers.

Over the course of the past seventeen years, I've witnessed the nature of the web change and countless internet trends come and go. As we celebrate Drupal's birthday, I'm proud to say it's one of the few content management systems that has stayed relevant for this long.

While the course of my career has evolved, Drupal has always remained a constant. It's what inspires me every day, and the impact that Drupal continues to make energizes me. Millions of people around the globe depend on Drupal to deliver their business, mission and purpose. Looking at the Drupal users in the video below gives me goosebumps.

Drupal's success is not only marked by the organizations it supports, but also by our community that makes the project more than just the software. While there were hurdles in 2017, there were plenty of milestones, too:

  • At least 190,000 sites running Drupal 8, up from 105,000 sites in January 2016 (80% year over year growth)
  • 1,597 stable modules for Drupal 8, up from 810 in January 2016 (95% year over year growth)
  • 4,941 DrupalCon attendees in 2017
  • 41 DrupalCamps held in 16 different countries in the world
  • 7,240 individual code contributors, a 28% increase compared to 2016
  • 889 organizations that contributed code, a 26% increase compared to 2016
  • 13+ million visitors to Drupal.org in 2017
  • 76,374 instance hours for running automated tests (the equivalent of almost 9 years of continuous testing in one year)

Since Drupal 1.0.0 was released, our community's ability to challenge the status quo, embrace evolution and remain resilient has never faltered. 2018 will be a big year for Drupal as we will continue to tackle important initiatives that not only improve Drupal's ease of use and maintenance, but also to propel Drupal into new markets. No matter the challenge, I'm confident that the spirit and passion of our community will continue to grow Drupal for many birthdays to come.

Tonight, we're going to celebrate Drupal's birthday with a warm skillet chocolate chip cookie topped with vanilla ice cream. Drupal loves chocolate! ;-)

Note: The video was created by Acquia, but it is freely available for anyone to use when selling or promoting Drupal.
Categories: Drupal

How to decouple Drupal in 2018?

10 January 2018 - 11:16am

In this post, I'm providing some guidance on how and when to decouple Drupal.

Almost two years ago, I had written a blog post called "How should you decouple Drupal?". Many people have found the flowchart in that post to be useful in their decision-making on how to approach their Drupal architectures. Since that point, Drupal, its community, and the surrounding market have evolved, and the original flowchart needs a big update.

Drupal's API-first initiative has introduced new capabilities, and we've seen the advent of the Waterwheel ecosystem and API-first distributions like Reservoir, Headless Lightning, and Contenta. More developers both inside and outside the Drupal community are experimenting with Node.js and adopting fully decoupled architectures. As a result, Acquia now offers Node.js hosting, which means it's never been easier to implement decoupled Drupal on the Acquia platform.

Let's start with the new flowchart in full:

All the ways to decouple Drupal

The traditional approach to Drupal architecture, also referred to as coupled Drupal, is a monolithic implementation where Drupal maintains control over all front-end and back-end concerns. This is Drupal as we've known it — ideal for traditional websites. If you're a content creator, keeping Drupal in its coupled form is the optimal approach, especially if you want to achieve a fast time to market without as much reliance on front-end developers. But traditional Drupal 8 also remains a great approach for developers who love Drupal 8 and want it to own the entire stack.

A second approach, progressively decoupled Drupal, offers an approach that strikes a balance between editorial needs like layout management and developer desires to use more JavaScript, by interpolating a JavaScript framework into the Drupal front end. Progressive decoupling is in fact a spectrum, whether it is Drupal only rendering the page's shell and populating initial data — or JavaScript only controlling explicitly delineated sections of the page. Progressively decoupled Drupal hasn't taken the world by storm, likely because it's a mixture of both JavaScript and PHP and doesn't take advantage of server-side rendering via Node.js. Nonetheless, it's an attractive approach because it makes more compromises and offers features important to both editors and developers.

Last but not least, fully decoupled Drupal has gained more attention in recent years as the growth of JavaScript continues with no signs of slowing down. This involves a complete separation of concerns between the structure of your content and its presentation. In short, it's like treating your web experience as just another application that needs to be served content. Even though it results in a loss of some out-of-the-box CMS functionality such as in-place editing or content preview, it's been popular because of the freedom and control it offers front-end developers.

What do you intend to build?

The most important question to ask is what you are trying to build.

  1. If your plan is to create a single standalone website or web application, decoupling Drupal may or may not be the right choice based on the must-have features your developers and editors are asking for.
  2. If your plan is to create multiple experiences (including web, native mobile, IoT, etc.), you can use Drupal to provide web service APIs that serve content to other experiences, either as (a) a content repository with no public-facing component or (b) a traditional website that is also a content repository at the same time.

Ultimately, your needs will determine the usefulness of decoupled Drupal for your use case. There is no technical reason to decouple if you're building a standalone website that needs editorial capabilities, but that doesn't mean people don't prefer to decouple because of their preference for JavaScript over PHP. Nonetheless, you need to pay close attention to the needs of your editors and ensure you aren't removing crucial features by using a decoupled approach. By the same token, you can't avoid decoupling Drupal if you're using it as a content repository for IoT or native applications. The next part of the flowchart will help you weigh those trade-offs.

Today, Drupal makes it much easier to build applications consuming decoupled Drupal. Even if you're using Drupal as a content repository to serve content to other applications, well-understood specifications like JSON API, GraphQL, OpenAPI, and CouchDB significantly lower its learning curve and open the door to tooling ecosystems provided by the communities who wrote those standards. In addition, there are now API-first distributions optimized to serve as content repositories and SDKs like Waterwheel.js that help developers "speak" Drupal.

Are there things you can't live without?

Perhaps most critical to any decision to decouple Drupal is the must-have feature set desired for both editors and developers. In order to determine whether you should use a decoupled Drupal, it's important to isolate which features are most valuable for your editors and developers. Unfortunately, there is are no black-and-white answers here; every project will have to weigh the different pros and cons.

For example, many marketing teams choose a CMS because they want to create landing pages, and a CMS gives them the ability to lay out content on a page, quickly reorganize a page and more. The ability to do all this without the aid of a developer can make or break a CMS in marketers' eyes. Similarly, many digital marketers value the option to edit content in the context of its preview and to do so across various workflow states. These kind of features typically get lost in a fully decoupled setting where Drupal does not exert control over the front end.

On the other hand, the need for control over the visual presentation of content can hinder developers who want to craft nuanced interactions or build user experiences in a particular way. Moreover, developer teams often want to use the latest and greatest technologies, and JavaScript is no exception. Nowadays, more JavaScript developers are including modern techniques, like server-side rendering and ES6 transpilation, in their toolboxes, and this is something decision-makers should take into account as well.

How you reconcile this tension between developers' needs and editors' requirements will dictate which approach you choose. For teams that have an entirely editorial focus and lack developer resources — or whose needs are focused on the ability to edit, place, and preview content in context — decoupling Drupal will remove all of the critical linkages within Drupal that allow editors to make such visual changes. But for teams with developers itching to have more flexibility and who don't need to cater to editors or marketers, fully decoupled Drupal can be freeing and allow developers to explore new paradigms in the industry — with the caveat that many of those features that editors value are now unavailable.

What will the future hold?

In the future, and in light of the rapid evolution of decoupled Drupal, my hope is that Drupal keeps shrinking the gap between developers and editors. After all, this was the original goal of the CMS in the first place: to help content authors write and assemble their own websites. Drupal's history has always been a balancing act between editorial needs and developers' needs, even as the number of experiences driven by Drupal grows.

I believe the next big hurdle is how to begin enabling marketers to administer all of the other channels appearing now and in the future with as much ease as they manage websites in Drupal today. In an ideal future, a content creator can build a content model once, preview content on every channel, and use familiar tools to edit and place content, regardless of whether the channel in question is mobile, chatbots, digital signs, or even augmented reality.

Today, developers are beginning to use Drupal not just as a content repository for their various applications but also as a means to create custom editorial interfaces. It's my hope that we'll see more experimentation around conceiving new editorial interfaces that help give content creators the control they need over a growing number of channels. At that point, I'm sure we'll need another new flowchart.

Conclusion

Thankfully, Drupal is in the right place at the right time. We've anticipated the new world of decoupled CMS architectures with web services in Drupal 8 and older contributed modules. More recently, API-first distributions, SDKs, and even reference applications in Ember and React are giving developers who have never heard of Drupal the tools to interact with it in unprecedented ways. Moreover, for Acquia customers, Acquia's recent launch of Node.js hosting on Acquia Cloud means that developers can leverage the most modern approaches in JavaScript while benefiting from Drupal's capabilities as a content repository.

Unlike many other content management systems, old and new, Drupal provides a spectrum of architectural possibilities tuned to the diverse needs of different organizations. This flexibility between fully decoupling Drupal, progressively decoupling it, and traditional Drupal — in addition to each solution's proven robustness in the wild — gives teams the ability to make an educated decision about the best approach for them. This optionality sets Drupal apart from new headless content management systems and most SaaS platforms, and it also shows Drupal's maturity as a decoupled CMS over WordPress. In other words, it doesn't matter what the team looks like or what the project's requirements are; Drupal has the answer.

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Alex Bronstein, Angie Byron, Gabe Sullice, Samuel Mortenson, Ted Bowman and Wim Leers for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Acquia retrospective 2017

8 January 2018 - 2:45am
The entrance to Acquia's headquarters in Boston.

For the past nine years, I've sat down every January to write an Acquia retrospective. It's always a rewarding blog post to write as it gives me an opportunity to reflect on what Acquia has accomplished over the past 12 months. If you'd like to read my previous annual retrospectives, they can be found here: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009. When read together, they provide insight to what has shaped Acquia into the company it is today.

This year's retrospective is especially meaningful because 2017 marked Acquia's 10th year as a company. Over the course of Acquia's first decade, our long-term investment in open source and cloud has made us the leader in web content management. 2017 was one of our most transformative years to date; not only did we have to manage leadership changes, but we also broadened our horizons beyond website management to data-driven customer journeys.

The next phase of Acquia leadership Tom Erickson joined Acquia as CEO in 2009 and worked side-by-side with me for the next eight years.

In my first retrospective from 2009, I shared that Jay Batson and I had asked Tom Erickson to come aboard as Acquia's new CEO. For the next eight years, Tom and I worked side-by-side to build and grow Acquia. Tom's expertise in taking young companies to the next level was a natural complement to my technical strength. His leadership was an example that enabled me to develop my own business building skills. When Tom announced last spring that he would be stepping down as Acquia's CEO, I assumed more responsibility to help guide the company through the transition. My priorities for 2017 were centered around three objectives: (1) the search for a new CEO, (2) expanding our product strategy through a stronger focus on innovation, and (3) running our operations more efficiently.

The search for a new CEO consumed a great deal of my time in 2017. After screening over 140 candidates and interviewing ten of them in-depth, we asked Mike Sullivan to join Acquia as CEO. Mike has been on the job for three weeks and I couldn't be more excited.

Mike Sullivan joins Acquia as CEO with 25 years of senior leadership in SaaS, enterprise content management and content governance.
Market trends

I see three major market trends that I believe are important to highlight and that help inform our strategy.

Trend #1: Customers are driven by time-to-value and low cost of maintenance

Time-to-value and low maintenance costs are emerging as two of the most important differentiators in the market. This is consistent with a post I wrote eleven years ago, in regards to The Ockham's Razor Principle of Content Management Systems. The principle states that given two functionally equivalent content management systems, the simplest one should be selected. Across both the low and the high ends of the market, time-to-value and total cost of ownership matter a great deal. Simplicity wins.

In the low end of the market simple sites, such as single blogs and brochure sites, are now best served by SaaS tools such as Squarespace and Wix. Over the past five years, SaaS solutions have been rising in prominence because their templated approach to simple site building makes them very easy to use. The total cost of ownership is also low as users don't have to update and maintain the software and infrastructure themselves. Today, I believe that Drupal is no longer ideal for most simple sites and instead is best suited for more ambitious use cases. Not everyone likes that statement, but I believe it to be true.

In the mid-market, SaaS tools don't offer the flexibility and customizability required to support sites with more complexity. Often mid-market companies need more customizable solutions like Drupal or WordPress. Time-to-value and total maintenance costs still matter; people don't want to spend a lot of time installing or upgrading their websites. Within the scope of Ockham's Razor Principle, WordPress does better than Drupal in this regard. WordPress is growing faster than Drupal for websites with medium complexity because ease of use and maintenance often precede functionality. However, when superior flexibility and architecture are critical to the success of building a site, Drupal will be selected.

In the enterprise, a growing emphasis on time-to-value means that customers are less interested in boil-the-ocean projects that cost hundreds of thousands (or millions) of dollars. Customers still want to do large and ambitious projects, but they want to start small, see results quickly, and measure their ROI every step along the way. Open source and cloud provide this agility by reducing time-to-market, cost and risk. This establishes a competitive advantage for Acquia compared to traditional enterprise vendors like Adobe and Sitecore.

At Acquia, understanding how we can make our products easier to use by enhancing self-service and reducing complexity will be a major focus of 2018. For Drupal, it means we have to stay focused on the initiatives that will improve usability and time to value. In addition to adopting a JavaScript framework in core to facilitate the building of a better administration experience, work needs to continue on Workspaces (content staging), Layout Builder (drag-and-drop blocks), and the Media, Outside-in and Out-of-the-box initiatives. Finally, I anticipate that a Drupal initiative around automated upgrades will kick off in 2018. I'm proud to say that Acquia has been a prominent contributor to many of these initiatives, by either sponsoring developers, contributing code, or providing development support and coordination.

Trend #2: Frictionless user experiences require greater platform complexity

For the past ten years, I've observed one significant factor that continues to influence the trajectory of digital: the internet's continuous drive to mitigate friction in user experience and business models. The history of the web dictates that lower-friction solutions will surpass what came before them because they eliminate inefficiencies from the customer experience.

This not only applies to how technology is adopted, but how customer experiences are created. Mirroring Ockham's Razor Principle, end users and consumers also crave simplicity. End users are choosing to build relationships with brands that guarantee contextual, personalized and frictionless interactions. However, simplicity for end users does not translate into simplicity for CMS owners. Organizations need to be able to manage more data, channels and integrations to deliver the engaging experiences that end users now expect. This desire on the part of end users creates greater platform complexity for CMS owners.

For example, cross-channel experiences are starting to remove certain inefficiencies around traditional websites. In order to optimize the customer experience, enterprise vendors must now expand their digital capabilities beyond web content management and invest in both systems of engagement (various front-end solutions such as conversational interfaces, chatbots, and AR/VR) and systems of intelligence (marketing tools for personalization and predictive analytics).

This year, Acquia Labs built a demo to explore how augmented reality can improve shopping experiences.

These trends give organizations the opportunity to reimagine their customer experience. By taking advantage of more channels and more data (e.g. being more intelligent, personalized, and contextualized), we can leapfrog existing customer experiences. However, these ambitious experiences require a platform that prioritizes customization and functionality.

Trend #3: The decoupled CMS market is taking the world by storm

In the web development world, few trends are spreading more rapidly than decoupled content management systems. The momentum is staggering as some decoupled CMS vendors are growing at a rate of 150% year over year. This trend has a significant influence on the technology landscape surrounding Drupal, as a growing number of Drupal agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of Drupal agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.

The Drupal community's emphasis on making Drupal API-first, in addition to supporting tools such as Waterwheel and Drupal distributions such as Reservoir, Contenta and Lightning, means that Drupal 8 is well-prepared to support decoupled CMS strategies. For years, including in 2017, Acquia has been a very prominent contributor to a variety of API-first initiatives.

Product milestones

In addition to my focus on finding a new CEO, driving innovation to expand our product offering was another primary focus in 2017.

Throughout Acquia's first decade, we've been focused primarily on providing our customers with the tools and services necessary to scale and succeed with Drupal. We've been very successful with this mission. However, many of our customers need more than content management to be digital winners. The ability to orchestrate customer experiences across different channels is increasingly important to our customers' success. We need to be able to support these efforts on the Acquia platform.

We kicked off our new product strategy by adding new products to our portfolio, and by extending our existing products with new capabilities that align with our customers' evolving needs.

  • Acquia Cloud: A "continuous integration" and "continuous delivery" service for developers was our #1 requested feature, so we delivered Acquia Cloud CD early in 2017. Later in the year, we expanded Acquia Cloud to support Node.js, the popular open-source JavaScript runtime. This was the first time we expanded our cloud beyond Drupal. Previously, if an organization wanted to build a decoupled Drupal architecture with Node.js, it was not able to host the Node.js application on Acquia Cloud. Finally, in order to make Acquia Cloud easier to use, we started to focus more on self-service. We saw rapid customer adoption of our new Stack Metrics feature, which gives customers valuable insight into performance and utilization. We also introduced a new Cloud Service Management model, which empowers our customer to scale their Acquia Cloud infrastructure on the fly.
  • Acquia Lift: In order to best support our customers as they embed personalization into their digital strategies, we have continued to add product enhancements to the new version of Acquia Lift. This included improving Acquia Lift's content authoring capabilities, enhanced content recommendations, and advanced analytics and reporting. The Acquia Lift team grew, as we also founded a machine learning and artificial intelligence team, which will lead to new features and products in 2018. In 2017, Acquia Lift has added over 200 new features, tracks 200% more profiles than in 2016, and has grown 45% in revenue.

Next, we added two new products to support our evolution from content management to data-driven customer journeys: Acquia Journey and Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM).

  • Acquia Journey allows marketers to easily map, assemble, orchestrate and manage customer experiences across different channels. One of the strengths of Acquia Journey is that it allows technical teams to integrate many different technologies, from marketing and advertising technologies to CRM tools and commerce platforms. Acquia Journey unifies these various interaction points within a single user interface, making it possible to quickly assemble powerful and complex customer journeys. In turn, marketers can take advantage of a flowchart-style journey mapping tool with unified customer profiles and an automated decision engine to determine the best-next action for engaging customers.
  • Acquia DAM: Many organizations lack a single-source of truth when it comes to managing digital assets. This challenge has been amplified as the number of assets has rapidly increased in a world with more devices, more channels, more campaigns, and more personalized and contextualized experiences In addition to journey orchestration, it became clear that large organizations are seeking a digital asset management solution that centralizes control of creative assets for the entire company. With Acquia DAM, our customers can rely on one dedicated application to gather requirements, share drafts, consolidate feedback and collect approvals for high-value marketing assets.

Acquia's new product strategy is very ambitious. I'm proud of our stronger focus on innovation and the new features and products that we launched in 2017. Launching this many products and features is hard work and requires tactical coordination across every part of the company. The transition from a single-product company to a multi-product company is challenging, and I hope to share more lessons learned in future blog posts.


While each new product we announced was well-received, there is still a lot of work to be done: we need to continue to drive end-user demand for our new products and help our digital agency partners build practices around them.

Leading by example

At Acquia, our mission is to deliver "the universal platform for the greatest digital experiences", and we want to lead by example. In an effort to become a thought-leader in our field, the Office of the CTO launched Acquia Labs, our research and innovation lab. Acquia Labs aims to link together the new realities in our market, our customers' needs in coming years, and the goals of Acquia's products and open-source efforts in the long term.

Finally, we rounded out the year by redesigning Acquia.com on Drupal 8. The new site places a greater emphasis on taking advantage of our own products. We wanted to show (not tell) the power of the Acquia platform. For example, Acquia Lift delivers visitors personalized content throughout the site. The new site represents a bolder and more innovative Acquia, aligned with the evolution of our product strategy.

Business momentum

We continued to grow at a steady pace in 2017 and hired a lot of new people. We focused on the growth of our recurring revenue, which includes new customers and the renewal and expansion of our work with existing customers. We also focused on our bottom line.

In 2017, the top industry analysts published very positive reviews based on their independent research. I'm proud that Acquia was recognized by Forrester Research as the leader for strategy and vision, ahead of every other vendor including Adobe and Sitecore, in The Forrester Wave: Web Content Management Systems, Q1 2017. Acquia was also named a leader in the 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management, marking our placement as a leader for the fourth year in a row. In addition to being the only leader that is open-source or has a cloud-first strategy, Acquia was hailed by analysts for our investments in open APIs across all our products.

Over the course of 2017 Acquia welcomed an impressive roster of new customers who included Astella Pharma, Glanbia, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Bayer GmbH. As we enter 2018, Acquia can count 26 of the Fortune 100 among its customers, up from 16 at the beginning of 2017.

This year was also an incredible growth period for our Asia Pacific business, which is growing ARR at a rate of 80% year over year. We have secured new business in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and India. When we started our business in Australia in 2012, 70% of the pipeline came from govCMS, the platform offered by the Australian government to all national, territorial and local agencies. Today, our business is much more diverse, with 50% of the region's pipeline coming from outside of Australia.

Jeannie Finks, Director of Global Support Systems & Programs, accepting a Gold Stevie for Customer Service Team of the Year. Go team Acquia!

Customer success continues to be the most important driver of the evolution of Acquia's strategy. This commitment was reflected in 2017 customer satisfaction levels, which remains extremely high at 94 percent. Acquia's global support team also received top honors from the American Business Awards and won a Gold Stevie for Customer Service Team of the Year.

This year, we also saw our annual customer conference, Acquia Engage, grow. We welcomed over 650 people to Boston and saw presentations from over twenty customers, including Johnson & Johnson, NBC Sports, Whole Foods, AMD, the YMCA and many more. It was inspiring to hear our customers explain why Acquia and Drupal are essential to their business.

Finally, our partner ecosystem continues to advance. In 2016, we achieved a significant milestone as numerous global systems integrators repeatedly recommended Acquia to their clients. One year later, these partners are building large centers of excellence to scale their Acquia and Drupal practices. Digital agencies and Drupal companies also continue to extend their investments in Acquia, and are excited about the opportunity presented in our expanded product portfolio. In some markets, over 50 percent of our new subscriptions originate from our partner ecosystem.

The growth and performance of the partner community is validation of our strategy. For example, in 2017 we saw multiple agencies and integrators that were entirely committed to Adobe or Sitecore, join our program and begin to do business with us.

Opportunities for Acquia in 2018

When thinking about how Acquia has evolved its product strategy, I like to consider it in terms of Greylocks' Jerry Chen's take on the stack of enterprise systems. I've modified his thesis to fit the context of Acquia and our long-term strategy to help organizations with their digital transformation.

Chen's thesis begins with "systems of record", which are sticky and defensible not only because of their data, but also based on the core business process they own. Jerry identifies three major systems of record today; your customers, your employees and your assets. CRM owns your customers (i.e. Salesforce), HCM owns your employees (i.e. Workday), and ERP/Financials owns your assets. Other applications can be built around a system of record but are usually not as valuable as the actual system of record. For example, marketing automation companies like Marketo and Responsys built big businesses around CRM, but never became as strategic or as valuable as Salesforce. We call these "secondary systems of record". We believe that a "content repository" (API-first Drupal) and a "user profile repository" (Acquia Lift) are secondary systems of record. We will continue our efforts to improve Drupal's content repository and Lift's user profile repository to become stronger systems of record.

"Systems of engagement" are the interface between users and the systems of record. They control the end-user interactions. Drupal and Lift are great examples of systems of engagement as they allow for the rapid creation of end-user experiences.

Jerry Chen further suggests that "systems of intelligence" will be a third component. Systems of intelligence will be of critical importance for determining the optimal customer journey across various applications. Personalization (Acquia Lift), recommendations (Acquia Lift) and customer journey building (Acquia Journey) are systems of intelligence. They are very important initiatives for our future.

While Chen does not include "systems of delivery" in his thesis, I believe it is an important component. Systems of delivery not only dictate how content is delivered to users, but how organizations build projects faster and more efficiently for their stakeholders and users. This includes multi-site management (Acquia Cloud Site Factory) and continuous delivery services (Acquia Cloud CD), which extend the benefits of PaaS beyond scalability and reliability to include high-productivity and faster time-to-value for our customers. As organizations increase their investments in cross-channel experiences, they must manage more complexity and orchestrate the testing, integration and deployment of different technologies. Systems of delivery, such as Acquia Cloud and Acquia Site Factory, remove complexity from building and managing modern digital experiences.

This is all consistent with the diagram I've been using for a few years now where "user profile" and "content repository" represent two systems of record, getBestNextExperience() is the system of intelligence, and Drupal is the system of engagement to build the customer experience:

We are confident in the market shift towards "intelligent connected experiences" or "data-driven customer journeys" and the opportunity it provides to Acquia. Every team at Acquia has demonstrated both commitment and focus as we have initiated a shift to make our vision relevant in the market for years to come. I believe we have strong investments across systems of record, intelligence, delivery and engagement that will continue to put us at the center of our customers' technology and digital strategies in 2027.

Thank you

Of course, none of these 2017 results and milestones would be possible without the hard work of the Acquia team, our customers, partners, the Drupal community, and our many friends. Thank you for your support in 2017 and over the past ten years – I can't wait to see what the next decade will bring!

Categories: Drupal

More blogging and less social media

2 January 2018 - 6:53am

Happy New Year! 2017 was a busy and eventful year – both professionally and personally. In many ways, 2017 was the most challenging and best year to date. I'm excited about 2018 and optimistic about what it has in store.

I wanted to thank you all for reading my blog in 2017. Entering 2018, I plan on setting a New Years' resolution of using social media less, and blogging more.

I've been blogging for over 12 years and have been using social media for about 10. Both are black holes for content, however, I feel that blog content at least has a chance to "survive". My blog posts have made a bigger impact than my social media posts. It's not just me. I've seen many bloggers get sucked into social media. Many of them stopped blogging altogether, and they've lost their impact.

Blogging also helps me clarify my thoughts and deepen my thinking. The consistent practice of blogging has helped me grow. Social media doesn't encourage the same kind of deep thinking or thoughtfulness, and as a result, hasn't provided me the same personal growth.

This too, seems to be a universal phenomena. President Donald Trump has infamously relied on Twitter to communicate everything from policy decisions to mockery of opponents. He went so far to call the nuclear-armed Kim Jong Un short and fat on Twitter. This level of recklessness would be harder to accomplish in a long-form blog post on Whitehouse.gov.

Last but not least, the large, centralized social media companies don't sit well with me anymore. It's undeniable that these companies have provided a forum for people to connect and share information, and in many ways they've had a huge impact on human rights and civil liberties. However convenient or impactful they may be, their scale, influence and lack of transparency is of growing concern. In the summer of 2015, I predicted that their data privacy issues and lack of transparency were going to come to a head in the next five to ten years. It didn't take that long – Facebook's unsavory involvement in shaping public opinion started to turn the tide against them in 2017.

We can't have a handful of large platform companies control what people read. When too few organizations control the media and flow of information, we must be concerned. If we allow that to happen, we risk losing what has made the web the most important network in history – a decentralized platform that enables anyone to have a voice.

The web we build today will be the foundation for generations to come and it needs to remain decentralized. It's true that a decentralized web is harder to build and more difficult to use. Frankly, it will be difficult for the open web to win without better data portability, more regulatory oversight, better integrations, and more innovation and collaboration.

At the end of the day, I want to be part of the change that I wish to see in the world. To support this vision, I want to build my audience here, on my blog, on the edge of the internet, rather than on centralized platforms that are outside of my control. So going into 2018, expect me to blog more, and use social media less.

Categories: Drupal

Evolving Acquia.com

21 December 2017 - 4:21am

At Acquia, our mission is to deliver "the universal platform for the greatest digital experiences" and we want to lead by example. This year, Acquia's marketing team has been working hard to redesign Acquia.com. We launched the new Acquia.com last week. The new site is not only intuitive and engaging, but "practices what we preach", so to speak.

Over the course of our first decade, Acquia's website has seen a few iterations:

The new site places a greater emphasis on taking advantage of our own products. We wanted to show (not tell) the power of the Acquia Platform. For example, Acquia Lift delivers visitors personalized content throughout the site. It was also important to take advantage of Acquia's own resources and partner ecosystem. We worked in partnership with digital agency, HUGE, to create the new design and navigation.

In the spirit of sharing, the marketing team documented their challenges and insights along the way, and reported on everything from content migration to agile development.

The new site represents a bolder and more innovative Acquia, aligned with the evolution of our product strategy. The launch of our new site is a great way to round out a busy and transformative 2017. I'm also very happy to finally see Acquia.com on Drupal 8! Congratulations to every Acquian who helped make this project a success. Check out it out at https://www.acquia.com!

Categories: Drupal

Clean CSS with Stylelint

20 December 2017 - 7:29am

Last night I was working on the album functionality for this website. CSS is not my strong suit, so I wanted to get some help from a CSS linter. A CSS lint tool parses your CSS code and flags signs of inefficiency, stylistic inconsistencies, and patterns that may be erroneous.

I tried Stylelint, an open source CSS linter written in JavaScript that is maintained as an npm package. It was quick and easy to install on my local development environment:

$ npm install -g stylelint stylelint-config-standard stylelint-no-browser-hacks

The -g attribute instructs npm to install the packages globally, the stylelint-config-standard is a standard configuration file (more about that in a second), and the stylelint-no-browser-hacks is an optional Stylelint plugin.

Stylelint has over 150 rules to catch invalid CSS syntax, duplicates, etc. What is interesting about Stylelint is that it is completely unopinionated; all the rules are disabled by default. Configuring all 150+ rules would be very time-consuming. Fortunately you can use the example stylelint-config-standard configuration file as a starting point. This configuration file is maintained as a separate npm package. Instead of having to configure all 150+ rules, you can start with the stylelint-config-standard configuration file and overwrite the standard configuration with your own configuration file. In my case, I created a configuration file called stylelint.js in my Drupal directory.

"use strict" module.exports = { "extends": "stylelint-config-standard", "plugins": [ "stylelint-no-browser-hacks/lib" ], "rules": { "block-closing-brace-newline-after": "always", "color-no-invalid-hex": true, "indentation": 2, "property-no-unknown": true, "plugin/no-browser-hacks": [true, { "browsers": [ "last 2 versions", "ie >=8" ] }], "max-empty-lines": 1, "value-keyword-case": "lower", "at-rule-empty-line-before": null, "rule-empty-line-before": null, }, }

As you can see, the configuration file is a JSON file. I've extended stylelint-config-standard and overwrote the indentation rule to be 2 spaces instead of tabs, for example.

To check your CSS file, you can run Stylelint from the command line:

$ stylelint --config stylelint.js --config-basedir /usr/local/lib/node_modules/ css/album.css

In my case it found a couple of problems that were easy to fix:

For fun, I googled "Stylelint Drupal" and found that Alex Pott has proposed adding a Stylelint configuration file to Drupal core. Seems useful to me!

Categories: Drupal

Acquia gives back this holiday season

13 December 2017 - 10:31am

Yesterday in Acquia's Boston headquarters, there were hundreds of presents covering the lobby. These gifts were donated by over 130 Acquians on behalf of the Department of Children and Family Services' Wonderfund. For years, Acquia has participated in this holiday gift drive to support children that otherwise wouldn't receive presents this season. This December, we were able to collect gifts for 200 children throughout Massachusetts.

One of Acquia's founding values is to "Give back more". Inspired by our Open Source roots, contributing back to our communities is ingrained into the way we work. Acquia's annual gift drive is one of the most meaningful examples of giving back. It's incredibly heartwarming to see the effort and passion that goes into making the gift drive possible. Year after year, Acquia's gift drive remains one of my favorite office moments. It makes me incredibly proud to be an Acquian. Happy Holidays!

Categories: Drupal

Accelerate Drupal 8 by funding a Core Committer

11 December 2017 - 1:15pm

We have ambitious goals for Drupal 8, including new core features such as Workspaces (content staging) and Layout Builder (drag-and-drop blocks), completing efforts such as the Migration path and Media in core, automated upgrades, and adoption of a JavaScript framework.

I met with several of the coordinators behind these initiatives. Across the board, they identified the need for faster feedback from Core Committers, citing that a lack of Committer time was often a barrier to the initiative's progress.

We have worked hard to scale the Core Committer Team. When Drupal 8 began, it was just catch and myself. Over time, we added additional Core Committers, and the team is now up to 13 members. We also added the concept of Maintainer roles to create more specialization and focus, which has increased our velocity as well.

I recently challenged the Core Committer Team and asked them what it would take to double their efficiency (and improve the velocity of all other core contributors and core initiatives). The answer was often straightforward; more time in the day to focus on reviewing and committing patches.

Most don't have funding for their work as Core Committers. It's something they take on part-time or as volunteers, and it often involves having to make trade-offs regarding paying work or family.

Of the 13 members of the Core Committer Team, three people noted that funding could make a big difference in their ability to contribute to Drupal 8, and could therefore help them empower others:

  • Lauri 'lauriii' Eskola, Front-end Framework Manager — Lauri is deeply involved with both the Out-of-the-Box Experience and the JavaScript Framework initiatives. In his role as front-end framework manager, he also reviews and unblocks patches that touch CSS/JS/HTML, which is key to many of the user-facing features in Drupal 8.5's roadmap.
  • Francesco 'plach' Placella, Framework Manager — Francesco has extensive experience in the Entity API and multilingual initiatives, making him an ideal reviewer for initiatives that touch lots of moving parts such as API-First and Workflow. Francesco was also a regular go-to for the Drupal 8 Accelerate program due to his ability to dig in on almost any problem.
  • Roy 'yoroy' Scholten, Product Manager — Roy has been involved in UX and Design for Drupal since the Drupal 5 days. Roy's insights into usability best practices and support and mentoring for developers is invaluable on the core team. He would love to spend more time doing those things, ideally supported by a multitude of companies each contributing a little, rather than just one.

Funding a Core Committer is one of the most high-impact ways you can contribute to Drupal. If you're interested in funding one or more of these amazing contributors, please contact me and I'll get you in touch with them.

Note that there is also ongoing discussion in Drupal.org's issue queue about how to expose funding opportunities for all contributors on Drupal.org.

Categories: Drupal

We have 10 days to save net neutrality

4 December 2017 - 10:51am

Last month, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, released a draft order that would soften net neutrality regulations. He wants to overturn the restrictions that make paid prioritization, blocking or throttling of traffic unlawful. If approved, this order could drastically alter the way that people experience and access the web. Without net neutrality, Internet Service Providers could determine what sites you can or cannot see.

The proposed draft order is disheartening. Millions of Americans are trying to save net neutrality; the FCC has received over 5 million emails, 750,000 phone calls, and 2 million comments. Unfortunately this public outpouring has not altered the FCC's commitment to dismantling net neutrality.

The commission will vote on the order on December 14th. We have 10 days to save net neutrality.

Although I have written about net neutrality before, I want to explain the consequences and urgency of the FCC's upcoming vote.

What does Pai's draft order say?

Chairman Pai has long been an advocate for "light touch" net neutrality regulations, and claims that repealing net neutrality will allow "the federal government to stop micromanaging the Internet".

Specifically, Pai aims to scrap the protection that classifies ISPs as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934. Radio and phone services are also protected under Title II, which prevents companies from charging unreasonable rates or restricting access to services that are critical to society. Pai wants to treat the internet differently, and proposes that the FCC should simply require ISPs "to be transparent about their practices". The responsibility of policing ISPs would also be transferred to the Federal Trade Commission. Instead of maintaining the FCC's clear-cut and rule-based approach, the FTC would practice case-by-case regulation. This shift could be problematic as a case-by-case approach could make the FTC a weak consumer watchdog.

The consequences of softening net neutrality regulations

At the end of the day, frail net neutrality regulations mean that ISPs are free to determine how users access websites, applications and other digital content.

It is clear that depending on ISPs to be "transparent" will not protect against implementing fast and slow lanes. Rolling back net neutrality regulations means that ISPs could charge website owners to make their website faster than others. This threatens the very idea of the open web, which guarantees an unfettered and decentralized platform to share and access information. Gravitating away from the open web could create inequity in how communities share and express ideas online, which would ultimately intensify the digital divide. This could also hurt startups as they now have to raise money to pay for ISP fees or fear being relegated to the "slow lane".

The way I see it, implementing "fast lanes" could alter the technological, economic and societal impact of the internet we know today. Unfortunately it seems that the chairman is prioritizing the interests of ISPs over the needs of consumers.

What can you can do today

Chairman Pai's draft order could dictate the future of the internet for years to come. In the end, net neutrality affects how people, including you and me, experience the web. I've dedicated both my spare time and my professional career to the open web because I believe the web has the power to change lives, educate people, create new economies, disrupt business models and make the world smaller in the best of ways. Keeping the web open means that these opportunities can be available to everyone.

If you're concerned about the future of net neutrality, please take action. Share your comments with the U.S. Congress and contact your representatives. Speak up about your concerns with your friends and colleagues. Organizations like The Battle for the Net help you contact your representatives — it only takes a minute!

Now is the time to stand up for net neutrality: we have 10 days and need everyone's help.

Categories: Drupal

Massachusetts launches Mass.gov on Drupal

1 December 2017 - 12:06am

This year at Acquia Engage, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts launched Mass.gov on Drupal 8. Holly St. Clair, the Chief Digital Officer of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, joined me during my keynote to share how Mass.gov is making constituents' interactions with the state fast, easy, meaningful, and "wicked awesome".

Since its founding, Acquia has been headquartered in Massachusetts, so it was very exciting to celebrate this milestone with the Mass.gov team.

Constituents at the center

Today, 76% of constituents prefer to interact with their government online. Before Mass.gov switched to Drupal it struggled to provide a constituent-centric experience. For example, a student looking for information on tuition assistance on Mass.gov would have to sort through 7 different government websites before finding relevant information.

To better serve residents, businesses and visitors, the Mass.gov team took a data-driven approach. After analyzing site data, they discovered that 10% of the content serviced 89% of site traffic. This means that up to 90% of the content on Mass.gov was either redundant, out-of-date or distracting. The digital services team used this insight to develop a site architecture and content strategy that prioritized the needs and interests of citizens. In one year, the team at Mass.gov moved a 15-year-old site from a legacy CMS to Acquia and Drupal.

The team at Mass.gov also incorporated user testing into every step of the redesign process, including usability, information architecture and accessibility. In addition to inviting over 330,000 users to provide feedback on the pilot site, the Mass.gov team partnered with the Perkins School for the Blind to deliver meaningful accessibility that surpasses compliance requirements. This approach has earned Mass.gov a score of 80.7 on the System Usability Scale; 12 percent higher than the reported average.

Open from the start

As an early adopter of Drupal 8, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts decided to open source the code that powers Mass.gov. Everyone can see the code that make Mass.gov work, point out problems, suggest improvements, or use the code for their own state. It's inspiring to see the Commonwealth of Massachusetts fully embrace the unique innovation and collaboration model inherent to open source. I wish more governments would do the same!

Congratulations Mass.gov

The new Mass.gov is engaging, intuitive and above all else, wicked awesome. Congratulations Mass.gov!

Categories: Drupal

An update on the Workflow Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

22 November 2017 - 6:57am

Over the past weeks I have shared an update on the Media Initiative and an update on the Layout Initiative. Today I wanted to give an update on the Workflow Initiative.

Creating great software doesn't happen overnight; it requires a desire for excellence and a disciplined approach. Like the Media and Layout Initiatives, the Workflow Initiative has taken such an approach. The disciplined and steady progress these initiative are making is something to be excited about.

8.4: The march towards stability

As you might recall from my last Workflow Initiative update, we added the Content Moderation module to Drupal 8.2 as an experimental module, and we added the Workflows module in Drupal 8.3 as well. The Workflows module allows for the creation of different publishing workflows with various states (e.g. draft, needs legal review, needs copy-editing, etc) and the Content Moderation module exposes these workflows to content authors.

As of Drupal 8.4, the Workflows module has been marked stable. Additionally, the Content Moderation module is marked beta in Drupal 8.4, and is down to two final blockers before marking stable. If you want to help with that, check out the Content Moderation module roadmap.

8.4: Making more entity types revisionable

To advance Drupal's workflow capabilities, more of Drupal's entity types needed to be made "revisionable". When content is revisionable, it becomes easier to move it through different workflow states or to stage content. Making more entity types revisionable is a necessary foundation for better content moderation, workflow and staging capabilities. But it was also hard work and took various people over a year of iterations — we worked on this throughout the Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 development cycle.

When working through this, we discovered various adjacent bugs (e.g. bugs related to content revisions and translations) that had to be worked through as well. As a plus, this has led to a more stable and reliable Drupal, even for those who don't use any of the workflow modules. This is a testament to our desire for excellence and disciplined approach.

8.5+: Looking forward to workspaces

While these foundational improvements in Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 are absolutely necessary to enable better content moderation and content staging functionality, they don't have much to show for in terms of user experience changes. Now a lot of this work is behind us, the Workflow Initiative changed its focus to stabilizing the Content Moderation module, but is also aiming to bring the Workspace module into Drupal core as an experimental module.

The Workspace module allows the creation of multiple environments, such as "Staging" or "Production", and allows moving collections of content between them. For example, the "Production" workspace is what visitors see when they visit your site. Then you might have a protected "Staging" workspace where content editors prepare new content before it's pushed to the Production workspace.

While workflows for individual content items are powerful, many sites want to publish multiple content items at once as a group. This includes new pages, updated pages, but also changes to blocks and menu items — hence our focus on making things like block content and menu items revisionable. 'Workspaces' group all these individual elements (pages, blocks and menus) into a logical package, so they can be prepared, previewed and published as a group. This is one of the most requested features and will be a valuable differentiator for Drupal. It looks pretty slick too:

I'm impressed with the work the Workflow team has accomplished during the Drupal 8.4 cycle: the Workflow module became stable, the Content Moderation module improved by leaps and bounds, and the under-the-hood work has prepared us for content staging via Workspaces. In the process, we've also fixed some long-standing technical debt in the revisions and translations systems, laying the foundation for future improvements.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post and to Dick Olsson, Tim Millwood and Jozef Toth for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

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