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Propeople Blog: How to Configure CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile in Drupal 7

1 April 2014 - 4:31pm

Drupal is a great platform for ecommerce. If your business needs a Drupal website that accepts payments, a good payment system to use is CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile. This tool allows business to accept payments made online, over the phone, and through mobile devices without ever handling toxic payment data. CyberSource is owned by Visa and integrates quite nicely with Drupal Commerce.

It consists of securely managed payment forms or as a single page payment form for processing transactions. This allows you to decrease your Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) obligations, thereby reducing any risks associated with handling or storing sensitive payment information.

In order to get this up and running on your Drupal website, you simply need to follow a few steps:

1. Create and configure Secure Acceptance profiles

2. Configure CybeSource profile with Drupal

3. See the results!

 

Creating a Secure Acceptance Profile

Important: For using a Secure Acceptance experience, an active profile is needed.

A Secure Acceptance profile consists of settings that you configure to create a customer checkout experience. In order to create a Secure Acceptance profile, you need to:

1. Log in to Business Center with Merchant ID:

Note: If you don't have a Merchant ID you will need to create one (https://support.cybersource.com/cybskb/index?page=content&id=C887)

2. In the left navigation panel, choose Tools & Settings > Secure Acceptance > Profiles > Create New Profile.

3. Enter Profile information

  • Enter profile name
  • Enter profile ID. The profile ID is case sensitive and must be exactly 7 alphanumeric characters. This field is used in each transaction to identify and display the Secure Acceptance profile.
  • Enter a profile description
  • Check Web/Mobile
  • Enter a company name
  • Check Payment Tokenization, Decision Manager, Enable Verbose Data

4. Click the Create button. The Profile Settings page appears. You must activate a profile in order to use it, and you must configure these required fields before activating a profile:

  • Payment Settings
  • Create a Security Key
  • Display a Customer Response Page

 

Configuring Payment Settings

You must select the card types that you wish to offer to the customer as payment methods. For each card type you select you can also manage currencies, CVNs, and payer authentication options.

The Card Verification Number (CVN) is a three- or four-digit number printed on the back or front of a credit card. This number helps to ensure that the customer has possession of the card at the time of the transaction.

To add a card type and enable the CVN you must:

1. On the “Profile Settings” page, click Payment Settings. The Payment Settings page appears.

2. Click Add/Edit Card Types. The Add/Edit Card Types window appears.

3. Check each card type that you wish to offer to the customer as a payment method.

4. Click Update.

5. Click the pencil icon in the column for each card type. The Edit Card Settings appears.

6. Check CVN Display and CVN Required to display the CVN field on Secure Acceptance.

7. On the “Currencies” section click Select All or select a currency and use arrow to move it from the Disabled list to the Enabled list.

8. Click Update

9. In the Automatic Authorization Reversals section (on the Payment Settings page) check Fails AVS check and Fails CVN check. Authorization is automatically reversed on a transaction that fails an AVS check or a CVN check.

10. Click Save.

 

Creating a Security Key

The security script signs the request fields using the secret key and the HMAC SHA256 algorithm. To verify data, the security script generates a signature to compare with the signature returned from the Secure Acceptance server. You must have an active security key to activate a profile. A security key expires after 2 years. The security key protects each transaction from data tampering.

To create and activate a security key:

1. On the “Profile Settings”page, click Security. The Security Keys page appears.

2. Click Create New Key. The Create New Key page appears.

3. Enter a Key Name (required).

4. Chose signature version Version 1.

5. Choose signature method HMAC-SHA256.

6. Click Generate Key. The Create New Key window expands and displays the new access key and secret key. This window closes after 30 seconds.

7. Copy and save the access key and secret key.

  • Access key: Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) authentication with Secure Acceptance.
  • Secret key: signs the transaction data and is required for each transaction.

By default, the new security key is active.

8. Click Return to Profile home. The “Profile Settings” page appears.

 

Displaying a Customer Response Page

You can choose to have a transaction response page displayed to the customer at the end of the checkout process, and a cancel response page displayed during the checkout process. Enter a URL for your own customer response page or use the CyberSource hosted response pages.

To redirect a customer after Check-out:

1. On the “Profile Settings” page, click Customer Response Pages.

2. Under the Customer Redirect after Check-out heading, enter the URL for the custom page that the customer will be redirected to after checkout.

3. Click Save.

 

Activate Profile

To make your profile active:

1. On the "Profile Settings" page, click Promote to Active

 

2. Your profile is now active!

 

Drupal Site Configuration

1. Install the Commerce CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile contrib module.

2. Check that the module Payment UI is enabled.

3. From the Drupal admin menu, choose Store > Configuration > Payment Methods (or access path admin/commerce/config/payment-methods).

4. Select Edit Operation for payment method rule “CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile”

5. Edit the rule action “Enable payment method: CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile”.

6. In the Payment Settings section enter the Secure Acceptance profile details.

7. Enter Profile ID (configured during Step 3 -  Secure Acceptance Profile)

8. Enter Access Key and Secret key you created (see “Creating a Security Key” above)

9. Select Transaction mode:

10. Set Transaction Type to “Authorize Funds”

11. Locale (ex: English - American)

12. Set Payment method to “Card”

13. Enter text for Payment Submit Button Text.

14. Click Save.

15. On the Payment methods page, enable the rule for CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile.


Now, on the completion of order you can select Credit Card as the payment method.

After you click on “Continue to Next Step”you wil berl redirected to the Cybersource site.

After completion, and the display of CyberSource payments details, you will be redirected back to your Drupal site.

And that's it! If you follow all of the steps above, CyberSource Secure Acceptance Web/Mobile should be configured on your Drupal 7 site in no time. Make sure to contact us if you are looking for a technology partner to help you ensure the success of your Drupal business or ecommerce website. 

Good luck. 

Tags: DrupalDevelopmentpayment systemecommerceDrupal for BusinessCyberSourceCheck this option to include this post in Planet Drupal aggregator: planetTopics: Tech & Development
Categories: Drupal

Greater Los Angeles Drupal (GLAD): GLADCamp Rebrands as VLADCamp; Focuses on Drupal for Evil

1 April 2014 - 3:45pm

A new look for the Greater Los Angeles Area Drupal Camp has been unveiled. “VLADCamp” is the new name of the conference, co-organized by Greater Los Angeles Drupal organizing team member Christefano Reyes, who announced the name as it epitomizes the goals for the organization moving forward.

“GLADCamp was originally envisioned as being the Drupal community's marquee event of the year that heavily focuses on the needs of non-profits, education and civic engagement. After trying 'Drupal for Good' this year, we decided that 'Drupal for Evil' would be more fun,” he explained.

This marks a major shift in strategy for the user group, which for nearly 4 years has provided Drupal resources, including its Business Directory and Governance Policy, and events, including this year's inaugural GLADCamp conference.

"It's difficult growing a brand that's known for so many different things, such as meetups, job fairs, coworking days, study group sessions, workshops, code sprints and conferences," he said. "Now we stand for just one thing: Evil. We think our members will appreciate this simplification. Besides, being completely transparent and accountable is too hard."

According to Holly Ross, executive director of the Drupal Association, a non-profit whose mission is to foster and promote the Drupal software and community, "There is currently no other Drupal user group on our radar who is so blatantly dedicated to this behavior. We've been monitoring several user groups that have little transparency, little accountability or little consistency, but this is the first time we've seen a user group without all three," she said in a phone interview. "We're continuing to monitor the situation."

The VLADCamp organizing team is delighted with the impact of its new name and logo, which has been developed in consultation with Acquio, based in Burlington, Massachusetts. "We enjoy working with forward-thinking organizations who can pivot and provide value to underserved markets," said Acquio CMO Tom Wentworth, who featured VLADCamp as a successful launch partner of its content personalization service, Acquio Escalator.

Tags: Planet DrupalApril Fools Day
Categories: Drupal

Cocomore: DrupalDevDays Szeged 2014

1 April 2014 - 1:45pm

The last week three of us from Cocomore went to the little town of Szeged in Hungary around 175km south east of Budapest.

The DevDays were all about developing Drupal 8 further and enhance drupal.org. The only topic was contributing to Drupal in the one way or the other. Whatever you are, either a developer, a themer, a site builder, a devop or a business man, everyone has his/her part in this amazing community and everyone found a spot where he/she could help to foster Drupal further.

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Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon Austin News: DrupalCon Austin Sessions are Posted!

1 April 2014 - 1:14pm

How’s this for a session title? “Newfangeldy mobile and front-end crap for people who last touched front-end code back when grunge was a thing.”

Or this one? "Markup Ain't Easy or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love An Object-Oriented RenderAPI"

Categories: Drupal

Morten.dk: fields theming in Drupal8, kill the divitis

1 April 2014 - 12:35pm

I finally got to take a long & hard look at fields and why they have so much divitis + a solution of how to change it for Drupal8. It ended up beeing a ton of markup & css examples on a flat html page
take a look please provide feedback, here or on the issue or at my twitter etc.

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Categories: Drupal

Urban Insight: Top 10 Drupal Contributions of 2014

1 April 2014 - 8:53am

We will review some of the pretty neat Drupal contributions coming this year. The community as a whole has really outdone themselves. Step aside Drupal 8, you are about to get passed up. Without further ado, here is our top 10 Drupal contributions for 2014.

Categories: Drupal

Open Source Training: A Sub-theme of a Drupal Sub-theme

1 April 2014 - 8:42am

The best way to design and modify your Drupal site is with overrides.

If you're not sure how overrides work, read our introduction to Drupal overrides.

One of the most powerful ways to override Drupal is with sub-themes and sometimes even with sub-sub-themes. These allow you to safely override any themes you download from Drupal.org.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: Defining Our Roles in the Drupal Community

1 April 2014 - 8:41am
We need a better way to work together

This is a dense topic, and this post is very long. So, let me provide a short summary here before you all tl;dr me, which would be deserved. The long and short of it is that Association staff and other community members have to figure out a better way of working together.

Categories: Drupal

Kris Vanderwater: On pursuing new things.

1 April 2014 - 6:58am

It is with a mixture of bitter and sweet that I am officially announcing that I'm leaving Commerce Guys for a new position elsewhere. I have really enjoyed the last 3 (nearly 4) years at Commerce Guys. They have been an amazing place to grow both as a person and as a programmer. During my time there I've had the opportunity to work on numerous big projects and interesting technical challenges. Commerce Guys funded me to work full time on Drupal 8 as an initiative owner for months on end, and without that investment of time, I personally wouldn't have grown so much, nor would I have been able to contribute to Drupal 8 to the same degree. I cannot stress how great of an experience working there has been for me, and I'm thankful to all the people there who made that possible and made my own time there so enjoyable. I look forward to seeing them do great things.

As for my future, I am actually moving to Acquia. An interesting job position opened up there that will allow me to be the interface between Drupal's developer community and Acquia. This is especially interesting to me because it makes me part of the feedback loop that is intended to help Acquia understand what portions of Drupal developer experience are in need of improvement. In this role, I'll work in whatever capacity I have at my disposal to help mitigate these issues and improve Drupal from a developer experience perspective. In addition to this I'll function in the same capacity for various Acquia product offerings, and I find that very exciting as well.

In truth most developers want to escape client work, and despite what you might think, that is impossible if you want to continue development. We can only strive for better clients, whether that is literally a higher quality client, or whether you manage to make yourself your primary client, we always have clients. In many ways I think this move makes YOU my client, yes you. The whole of the Drupal community will be my singular client. I’ll interact with you at different levels, we’ll talk personally, we’ll talk corporately, we’ll interact at camps and cons. I’ll try a few things and I’ll probably fail at a few things, but I took this position because Drupal is really important, and I want to be a part of crafting its future in whatever capacity I might have available to me. This job opens that up in ways I hadn’t considered before, and that’s very exciting. Technically speaking, this is a marketing position, and I know that’s weird for a developer, but this is no mistake, I’ll just be marketing DX improvements, and gathering information about where DX is lackluster so that we can craft a better solution, together. I look forward to this role and this work, and I hope you do as well.

Kris “EclipseGc” Vanderwater

Categories: Drupal

Drupalize.Me: Questionnaire Confirms: Designers Aren't Clear How To Help Drupal 8

1 April 2014 - 5:15am

As mentioned in my previous blog post "Catching the Community Train" Lisa, Bojhan and myself will be working on a website to better facilitate the process of designers contributing to Drupal. Following my last blog post we sent out a questionnaire to current and previous contributors in order to gain some valuable insights that will help us move forward. In this blog post I will analyze the answers we received and share what they mean to me and how they will be instrumental in our success of helping designers more easily get involved in Drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Easy: DrupalEasy Podcast 126: Where is Yugoslavia? (Théodore Biadala)

1 April 2014 - 3:40am
Download Podcast 126

Théodore Biadala (nod_), technical consultant with Acquia, and one of the Drupal 8 JavaScript maintainers, joins Andrew, Ted, and Mike to talk about the current (and future) state of JavaScript in Drupal core. Also discussed is Acquia’s new certification program, DrupalCon Latin America, and picks of the week that you’re not going to want to miss!

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Categories: Drupal

Wunderkraut blog: Taking the Acquia Certified Drupal Developer exam

1 April 2014 - 1:59am

In the very recent period this new thing popped up in the Drupal community that has everybody talking: the Acquia certification for Drupal developers. I'm writing this article minutes after actually taking this exam to share with you my impressions.

Why did I take the certification?

One of the things that prompted me to it was Angie "webchick" Byron's article about her experience taking the exam. It sounded interesting but also relevant to me as a Drupal developer. It announced an exam that could determine my value in this field.

A second aspect I'd like to mention is the fact that I work with Drupal but do not have an IT background. I am, what you call, a self-taught. Therefore the idea of having a certificate to prove my worth sounded good to me. So I took the opportunity and the exam that came with it.

Impressions

There are 2 ways you can take the exam: on site (physically) or online. To deliver its online exam, Acquia collaborates with Web Assessor, a secured testing environment.

I chose the second option which meant I had to install some software onto my computer and go through a substantial verification process. This included biometric baseline recording of the face and keystrokes in order to be able to authenticate when I start taking the test. I know, advanced stuff.

To a certain extent I understand the need for this highly secure exam taking environment that prevents people from cheating. However, Web Assessor could have made things easier for people to take these necessary steps. What do I mean by this?

For one, there are contradictory instructions on the site. In one place it says you don't need an external webcam and microphone and in another it says you are not allowed with the built in computer ones. So which one is it? In the end, I did it with my internal ones, so it is possible.

I finally got through the hurdles of installing the software, closing all my apps, creating the biometric baseline, etc to arrive to the booking of the exam. It was very flexible and I could book a time in the same day: that's what I did. I liked that very much. However, I had to wonder about the timezone, just select an hour and hope it corresponded to my timezone. There was no indication as to which one was being used. Luckily, it was the right one so there was no problem. Therefore, in case you are wondering, it will be the timezone you are in when you book.

The whole process of preparing for the exam with Web Assessor took about an hour. Not so much the settings themselves but reading and understanding what I have to do, what I can do and what I can't do.

But what about the test?

I'm going to go right out and say it: the test was hard. But I was expecting it to be hard because otherwise it's pointless. It had only multiple choice questions with only one correct choice most of the time. For the others, you have checkboxes instead of radios.

Timewise, I had 90 minutes which for me was enough. I even got a chance to review some questions to change the answers and submitted the exam with some minutes to spare. And I appreciated the option to flag questions I'd like to review later.

I can't really go into what questions I got or how they were formulated but they were well balanced with regards to the domains covered by the exam.

One problem I had though was with the code formatting. Some of the questions contained code snippets that were a bit tricky to read / understand. I believe a bit more effort can be dedicated to making them more readable - especially when they are in the available choices. I recommend therefore, if possible, putting all code snippets in code blocks and properly spacing them.

I submitted the test and immediately got my result. Passed. It gave me a very good feeling and made me happy to take it. One thing I was disappointed with was the fact that I couldn't see which questions I got wrong. This may be just me but I was left a victim to obsession over which were those battleground questions that made me think so much. But anywho, we move on and develop some more Drupal sites.

Congrats Acquia on this great new initiative!

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Amazee Labs - first agency to relaunch its website on Drupal 8

1 April 2014 - 12:00am

Today we are proud to announce that amazeelabs.com, our main website, has been re-launched ON DRUPAL 8.

After countless hours of emotional debate we came to the conclusion that we required a bold move to communicate our position as Switzerland’s #1 Drupal agency. To put this straight we actually are the proud owners of the first company web presence on Drupal 8 - on the entire web!

We strongly believe that a website isn't the final destination after all, it’s just the medium for the creation and promotion of a site’s content.

Gregory Gerhardt, Managing Director and Founder of Amazee Labs, commented: ”For too long our brilliant design has fought an uphill battle against the evil work of copycats. Our new website design shall rest uncopied - simple, authentic, close to its roots."

We hope you like our new face.

Categories: Drupal

Metal Toad: Pond Life - Pt.1

31 March 2014 - 2:09pm
Assimilate and Elaborate!


Categories: Drupal

Web Wash: Using Environment Indicator in Drupal 7

31 March 2014 - 12:46pm

Every Drupal site builder will at some point experience the dread of accidentally making configuration changes on production thinking it's their local site. This sort of thing can easily happen when you have 20 tabs opened and forget which site you're currently browsing.

Luckily there's a module you can use to indicate which environment (local, staging, production, etc.) you're currently viewing and it's called Environment Indicator.

The module helps to separate each environment by displaying a coloured indicator. The indicator itself is fully configurable. You can change its colour, position and text.

In this tutorial, you'll learn how to create an indicator in two ways: through the module's UI and with some code in settings.php.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 alpha 11 on Apr. 23

31 March 2014 - 12:19pm

The next alpha for Drupal 8 will be alpha 11! Here is the schedule for the alpha release.

Apr. 20-22, 2014 Only critical and major patches committed Apr. 23, 2014 Drupal 8.0-alpha10 released. Emergency commits only. Apr. 24-27, 2014 Disruptive patch window
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Commerce: Quick and Dirty Price & Stock Updater with Editable Views

31 March 2014 - 10:01am

Have you ever wanted to be able to have a single page where you could update pricing and/or stock for your entire store? Look no further! Today you'll learn how to create a price and/or stock updater in 5 minutes with Views and the Editable Views module. It isn't perfect, but it can save you a bunch of time!

Read More

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: A Guide to Drupal Terminology

31 March 2014 - 9:51am

Getting started in Drupal can be daunting.  The first hurdle most people encounter is the terminology Drupal uses.  Some terms may be completely unfamiliar while others have a different meaning depending on the context.  The faster you learn to understand and speak Drupaleze, the easier it will be to communicate with other Drupal developers more effectively. To that end, here are a list of terms commonly used in the Drupal world:

Categories: Drupal

Blink Reaction: Being the Best Drupal Shop on the Planet

31 March 2014 - 9:47am

Preview of: A Complete Guide to Being the Best Drupal Shop on the Planet  - A session delivered by Kenny Silanskas at NYC Camp 2014

Categories: Drupal

Blink Reaction: Drupal for the .NET programmer

31 March 2014 - 9:46am

For years Drupal has been known for its powerful content management capabilities. Many large companies leverage Drupal for its rich features and vibrant community of contributors. More recently Drupal has caught the eyes of many developers as a viable framework for web application development. Enterprises shifting from a .NET development environment may find some of Drupal, PHP’s, and the LAMP stack in general a bit challenging to fully adopt.

Categories: Drupal


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