Planet Drupal

Subscribe to Planet Drupal feed
Drupal.org - aggregated feeds in category Planet Drupal
Updated: 21 hours 42 min ago

PreviousNext: PreviousNext's Open Source Contribution Policies and Initiatives for the Drupal Community

13 November 2019 - 6:03pm

PreviousNext builds open source digital platforms for large scale customers, primarily based on Drupal and hosted using Kubernetes, two of the world’s biggest open source projects. With our business reliant on the success of these open source projects, our company is committed to contributing where we can in relation to our relatively small size. We get a lot of questions about how we do this, so are happy to share our policies so that other organisations might adopt similar approaches.

by Owen Lansbury / 14 November 2019

We learned early on in the formation of PreviousNext that developers who are passionate and engaged in open source projects usually make great team members, so wanted to create a work environment where they could sustain this involvement. 

The first step was to determine how much billable work on client projects our developers needed to achieve in order for PreviousNext to be profitable and sustainable. The figure we settled on was 80%, or 32 hrs per week of billable hours of a full time week as the baseline. Team members then self manage their availability to fulfil their billable hours and can direct up to 20% of their remaining paid availability to code contribution or other community volunteering activities. 

From a project management perspective, our team members are not allowed to be scheduled on billable work more than 80% of their time, which is then factored into our Agile sprint planning and communicated to clients. If certain team members contribute more billable hours in a given week, this just accelerates how many tickets we can complete in a Sprint.

If individual team members aren’t involved or interested in contribution, we expect their billable hours rate to be higher in line with more traditional companies. We don’t mandate that team members use their 20% time for contribution, but find that the majority do due to the benefits it gives them outside their roles. 

These benefits include:

  • Learning and maintaining best-practice development skills based on peer review by other talented developers in the global community.
  • Developing leadership and communication skills with diverse and distributed co-contributors from many different cultures and backgrounds.
  • Staying close to and often being at the forefront of new initiatives in Drupal, whether it be as a core code contributor or maintaining key modules that get used by hundreds of thousands of people. For example, the Video Embed Field that Sam Becker co-maintains is used on 123,487 websites and has been downloaded a staggering 1,697,895 times at the time of publishing. That's some useful code!  
  • Developing close working relationships with many experienced and talented developers outside PreviousNext. In addition to providing mentoring and training for our team, these relationships pay dividends when we can open communication channels with people responsible for specific code within the Drupal ecosystem.
  • Building their own profiles within the community and being considered trusted developers in their own right by demonstrating a proven track record. After all, it's demonstrated work rather than the CV that matters most. This often leads to being selected to provide expert talks at conferences and obviously makes them highly desirable employees should they ever move on from PreviousNext.
  • If our team members do get selected as speakers at international Drupal events, PreviousNext funds their full attendance costs and treats their time away as normal paid hours.
  • Working on non-client work on issues that interest them, such as emerging technologies, proof of concepts, or just an itch they need to scratch. We never direct team members that they should be working on specific issues in their contribution time.

All of these individual benefits provide clear advantages to PreviousNext as a company, ensuring our team maintains an extremely high degree of experience and elevating our company’s profile through Drupal’s contribution credit system. This has resulted in PreviousNext being consistently ranked in the top 5 companies globally that contribute code to Drupal off the back of over 1,000 hours of annual code contribution.

In addition to this 20% contribution time, we also ensure that most new modules we author or patch during client projects are open sourced. Our clients are aware that billable time during sprints will go towards this and that they will also receive contribution credit on Drupal.org as the sponsor of the contributions. The benefits to clients of this approach include:

  • Open sourced modules they use and contribute to will be maintained by many other people in the Drupal community. This ensures a higher degree of code stability and security and means that if PreviousNext ceases to be engaged the modules can continue to be maintained either by a new vendor, their internal team or the community at large.
  • Clients can point to their own contribution credits as evidence of being committed Drupal community supporters in their own right. This can be used as a key element in recruitment if they start hiring their own internal Drupal developers.

Beyond code contributions, PreviousNext provides paid time to volunteer on organising Drupal events, sit on community committees, run free training sessions and organise code sprints. This is then backed by our financial contributions to sponsoring events and the Drupal Association itself.

None of this is rocket science, but as a company reliant on open source software we view these contribution policies and initiatives as a key pillar in ensuring PreviousNext's market profile is maintained and the Drupal ecosystem for our business to operate in remains healthy. 

We're always happy to share insights into how your own organisation might adopt similar approaches, so please get in touch if you'd like to know more.

Tagged Drupal Community, Core contribution
Categories: Drupal

Tag1 Consulting: A Deep Dive Into Yjs Part 2- Tag1 Team Talk #005

13 November 2019 - 2:28pm
Description Yjs, one of the most powerful and robust frameworks for real-time collaborative editing, enables developers to add shared editing capabilities to any application with relatively little effort. In order to make it so easy to use and extend Yjs, the framework abstracts all the complexities, many moving pieces, and deep technical concepts involved in empowering offline first, peer to peer, real time collaboration. In this Tag1 Team Talk, we continue our deep dive into Yjs with the founder and project lead of this collaborative editing framework to learn more about how it enables not only collaborative text editing but also collaborative drawing, collaborative 3D modeling, and other compelling use cases. In particular, we focus on the three core features that make up any great collaborative editing application: awareness, offline editing, and versioning with change histories. Join Kevin Jahns (Real-Time Collaboration Systems Lead at Tag1 Consulting and Founder and Project Lead of Yjs), Fabian Franz (Senior Technical Architect and Performance Lead at Tag1 Consulting), Michael Meyers (Managing Director at Tag1 Consulting), and moderator Preston So (Contributing Editor at Tag1 Consulting and Principal Product Manager at Gatsby) for the second part of our deep dive series on Yjs directly from its... Read more jgilbert Wed, 11/13/2019 - 14:28
Categories: Drupal

Manifesto: Making Drupal easier for beginners

13 November 2019 - 4:18am

Drupal is doing well.    The past few years (since Drupal 8 has been released), has seen the stability, power and (most importantly) the usage of Drupal increase. This is thanks to the hard work of all the organisations who support and enhance the CMS on a daily basis, whether that’s dedicating their time to. Continue reading...

The post Making Drupal easier for beginners appeared first on Manifesto.

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Common max-age Pitfalls When Working with Drupal's Page Cache

13 November 2019 - 12:18am

If you build sites with Drupal, you’ve probably heard at some point that Drupal 8’s caching system is great. So you probably think that it shouldn’t be a big deal to have a time-based piece of content in a Drupal page that's visited by millions of visitors, and still have a reasonable caching system behind it, right? Let’s figure it out in this article.

Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: Updating to Drupal 8.8.0 Beta with Composer

12 November 2019 - 8:46pm

PreviousNext continue to be major contributors to the development and promotion of Drupal 8. As participants of the Drupal 8.8.0 Beta Testing Program, we thought it would be useful to document the steps we took to update one of our sites on Drupal 8.7 to the latest 8.8.0 beta.

Every site is different, so your mileage may vary, but it may save you some time.

by Kim Pepper / 13 November 2019

Drupal 8.8 is a big release, with a number of new features added, and APIs deprecated to pave the way to a Drupal 9.0 release. Thankfully, the upgrade process was fairly straightforward in our case.

Upgrade PathAuto

First step was to deal with The Path Alias core subsystem has been moved to the "path_alias" module This meant some classes were moved to different namespaces. In order to make things smoother, we installed the latest version of pathauto module and clear the caches.

composer require drupal/pathauto:^1.6@beta
drush cr

Core Dev Composer Package

We use the same developer tools for testing as Drupal core, and we want to switch to the new core composer packages, so first we remove the old one.

composer remove --dev webflo/drupal-core-require-dev

Update Patches

We sometimes need to patch core using cweagans/composer-patches. In the case of this site, we are using a patch from ckeditor_stylesheets cache busting: use system.css_js_query_string which needed to be re-rolled for Drupal 8.8.x. We re-rolled the patch, then updated the link in the extra/patches section.

Update Drupal Core and Friends

In our first attempt, composer could not install due to a version conflict with some symfony packages (symfony/findersymfony/filesystem and symfony/debug). These are transient dependencies (we don't require them explicitly). Our solution was to explicitly require them (temporarily) with versions that Drupal core is compatible with, then remove them afterwards.

First require new Drupal core and dependencies:

composer require --update-with-dependencies \
  drupal/core:^8.8@beta \
  symfony/finder:^3.4 \
  symfony/filesystem:^3.4

Second, require new core-dev package and dependencies:

composer require --dev --update-with-dependencies \
  drupal/core-dev:^8.8@beta \
  symfony/debug:^3.4

Lastly, remove the temporary required dependencies:

composer remove -n \
  symfony/finder \
  symfony/filesystem \
  symfony/debug

Update the Database and Export Config

Now our code is updated, we need to update the database schema, then re-export our config. We use drush_cmi_tools, so your commands may be different, e.g. just a drush config-export instead of drush cexy.

drush updb
drush cr
drush cexy

Settings.php

We also need to update our settings.php file now that The sync directory is defined in $settings and not $config_directories.

This is a trivial change from:

$config_directories['sync'] = 'foo/bar';to:$settings['config_sync_directory'] = 'foo/bar';

Final Touches

In order to make sure our code is compatible with Drupal 9, we check for any custom code that is using deprecated APIs using the excellent PHPStan and Matt Glaman's mglaman/phpstan-drupal. (Alternatively you can use Drupal Check.)

 We were using an older version that was incompatible with "nette/bootstrap":">=3" so needed to remove that from the conflict section and do the remove/require dance once again.

composer remove --dev \
  phpstan/phpstan-deprecation-rules \
  mglaman/phpstan-drupal

composer require --dev --update-with-dependencies \
  phpstan/phpstan-deprecation-rules:^0.11.2 \
  mglaman/phpstan-drupal:^0.11.12

And that's it! Altogether not too painful once the composer dependencies were all sorted out. As we are testing the beta, some of these issues may be addressed in future betas and RCs.

I hope you found this useful! Got a better solution? Let us know in the comments!

Tagged Drupal Beta Testing
Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: Updating to Drupal 8.8.0 Beta with Composer

12 November 2019 - 8:46pm

PreviousNext continue to be major contributors to the development and promotion of Drupal 8. As participants of the Drupal 8.8.0 Beta Testing Program, we thought it would be useful to document the steps we took to update one of our sites on Drupal 8.7 to the latest 8.8.0 beta.

Every site is different, so your mileage may vary, but it may save you some time.

by Kim Pepper / 13 November 2019

Drupal 8.8 is a big release, with a number of new features added, and APIs deprecated to pave the way to a Drupal 9.0 release. Thankfully, the upgrade process was fairly straightforward in our case.

Upgrade PathAuto

First step was to deal with The Path Alias core subsystem has been moved to the "path_alias" module This meant some classes were moved to different namespaces. In order to make things smoother, we installed the latest version of pathauto module and clear the caches.

composer require drupal/pathauto:^1.6@beta
drush cr

Core Dev Composer Package

We use the same developer tools for testing as Drupal core, and we want to switch to the new core composer packages, so first we remove the old one.

composer remove --dev webflo/drupal-core-require-dev

Update Patches

We sometimes need to patch core using cweagans/composer-patches. In the case of this site, we are using a patch from ckeditor_stylesheets cache busting: use system.css_js_query_string which needed to be re-rolled for Drupal 8.8.x. We re-rolled the patch, then updated the link in the extra/patches section.

Update Drupal Core and Friends

In our first attempt, composer could not install due to a version conflict with some symfony packages (symfony/findersymfony/filesystem and symfony/debug). These are transient dependencies (we don't require them explicitly). Our solution was to explicitly require them (temporarily) with versions that Drupal core is compatible with, then remove them afterwards.

First require new Drupal core and dependencies:

composer require --update-with-dependencies \
  drupal/core:^8.8@beta \
  symfony/finder:^3.4 \
  symfony/filesystem:^3.4

Second, require new core-dev package and dependencies:

composer require --dev --update-with-dependencies \
  drupal/core-dev:^8.8@beta \
  symfony/debug:^3.4

Lastly, remove the temporary required dependencies:

composer remove -n \
  symfony/finder \
  symfony/filesystem \
  symfony/debug

Update the Database and Export Config

Now our code is updated, we need to update the database schema, then re-export our config. We use drush_cmi_tools, so your commands may be different, e.g. just a drush config-export instead of drush cexy.

drush updb
drush cr
drush cexy

Settings.php

We also need to update our settings.php file now that The sync directory is defined in $settings and not $config_directories.

This is a trivial change from:

$config_directories['sync'] = 'foo/bar';to:$settings['config_sync_directory'] = 'foo/bar';

Final Touches

In order to make sure our code is compatible with Drupal 9, we check for any custom code that is using deprecated APIs using the excellent PHPStan and Matt Glaman's mglaman/phpstan-drupal. (Alternatively you can use Drupal Check.)

 We were using an older version that was incompatible with "nette/bootstrap":">=3" so needed to remove that from the conflict section and do the remove/require dance once again.

composer remove --dev \
  phpstan/phpstan-deprecation-rules \
  mglaman/phpstan-drupal

composer require --dev --update-with-dependencies \
  phpstan/phpstan-deprecation-rules:^0.11.2 \
  mglaman/phpstan-drupal:^0.11.12

And that's it! Altogether not too painful once the composer dependencies were all sorted out. As we are testing the beta, some of these issues may be addressed in future betas and RCs.

I hope you found this useful! Got a better solution? Let us know in the comments!

Tagged Drupal Beta Testing
Categories: Drupal

JD Does Development: Docksal gets a Training

12 November 2019 - 3:19pm
Docksal gets a Training jflynn Tue, 11/12/2019 - 17:19

In July of last year I started a new job as a developer with a new agency. During my first week, in between meetings, HR trainings, and all the other fun things that happen during onboarding, I was introduced to the preferred local development environment that was being used on most of the projects.

It was lightweight, based on Docker, it ran easily, and it was extremely easy to configure. Prior to this, I had bounced around from local setup to local setup. My local dev environment resume included such hits as MAMP, WAMP, Acquia Dev Desktop, Kalabox, VAMPD, DrupalVM, Vagrant, ScotchBox, VirtualBox, native LAMP stacks, and everything in between. All of them had their strengths and weaknesses, but none of them really had that spark that really hooked me.

Enter Docksal.

When I first started using Docksal, I thought it was just like any other setup, and to a point, it is. It creates a reusable environment that can be shared across multiple developers and setup to mimic a hosting provider to a certain point, but the two things that really grabbed me were how easy it was to get started and how fast it was compared to other systems. Docksal has one key, killer feature in my opinionated mind, and that’s the fact that the entire application is written in Bash. The primary binary (which may or may not be the name of my upcoming one-man, off-Broadway, off-any stage show) begins with #! /usr/bin/env bash and runs on any system that has the bash executable, which encompasses Linux (of course), macOS, and now Windows thanks to WSL and the ability to add Ubuntu.

One thing that was missing, though, was a training guide. It has AMAZING documentation, available at https://docs.docksal.io, including a great getting started walkthrough, but for someone just starting out using it who might not have guidance and support from people they work with, it might take a little getting used to.

If you know me, you know that I enjoy talking at conferences. I’ve given over two dozen presentations at several types of events from local meetup groups to national level conferences. If you don’t know me, you just learned something new about me. Since I enjoy talking in front of people so much, the next logical step was to find something I’m familiar with and make a training of it. Turns out, I’m familiar with Docksal.

I submitted my pitch for a training to NEDCamp, the New England Drupal Camp, and they accepted it. Since I now had a reason to write a training, I began writing a training. Initially, I started with a very high-level outline, and eventually built a framework for my training. Thanks to the nature of open source, I was able to use many of the features that https://docs.docksal.io already had in order to make my training seem a little familiar to current users and easily accessible to new users.

The first go at this training will be at NEDCamp 2019 on Friday, November 22nd. This will be the first time a dedicated training spot has been used to train on Docksal, and I'm extremely excited to see how it goes and how to improve. After that training, I will make my handbook available online, eventually to be merged into the Docksal Github repo as part of the documentation. I have had help from numerous people in building this training, especially from the Docksal maintainers, Sean Dietrich, Leonid Makarov, Alexei Chekiulaev; folks who have reviewed what I've written so far, Dwayne McDaniel and Wes Ruvalcaba; and people who have challenged me to learn more about Docksal, whose numbers are too high to list them all.

If you're interested in learning how to use Docksal or what it's all about, consider attending my training at NEDCamp on November 22nd. You can find all the details on the NEDCamp training page, and if you can't make it, be sure to watch for the handbook to be released soon.

Since I'm still working on the finishing touches, why not take the time to let me know what you would like to get out of this type of training or what you wish you would have known when learning how to use Docksal or a similar product in the comments and where you feel extra attention should be placed.

Category Development Tags Drupal Planet Docksal Drupal NEDCamp Comments
Categories: Drupal

Tag1 Consulting: A Deep Dive into Yjs part 1- Tag1 Team Talk #004

12 November 2019 - 11:28am
Description Yjs is a very compelling choice when it comes to building real-time collaborative applications. A powerful open-source, offline first, peer to peer, shared editing framework that is modular and extensible, Yjs enables developers to easily add real time collaborative capabilities to any type of application. Rich text editing, drawing, 3d modeling... the list of potential use cases for Yjs is lengthy and remarkable. But how did it get started, what is the algorithm it’s based on, and what does the future hold for Yjs? In this Tag1 Team Talk, hear directly from Kevin Jahns, the creator of Yjs, as we dive deeply into the foundations of Yjs and where it’s headed. Join moderator Preston So (Contributing Editor, Tag1 Consulting) and guests Kevin Jahns (Real Time Collaboration Systems Lead, Tag1; Creator of Yjs), Fabian Franz (Senior Technical Architect and Performance Lead, Tag1), and Michael Meyers (Managing Director, Tag1) for an insider’s perspective on the past, present, and future of Yjs. Related Content A Deep Dive into Yjs Part 2 Evaluating Real Time Collaborative Editing Solutions for a Top Fortune 50 Company Modern Rich Text Editors: How to Evaluate the Evolving LandscapeRead more jgilbert Tue, 11/12/2019 - 11:28
Categories: Drupal

Yusef Blog: Composer cheatsheet for a Drupalist

12 November 2019 - 7:31am
As you know Composer is a great tool to manage packages and their dependencies in PHP, while in Drupal 8.8 is going to more composer compatible, you can find composer cheatsheet in the following.    
Categories: Drupal

Hook 42: Drupal Core Initiative Meetings Recap - November 04 - November 08, 2019

12 November 2019 - 6:30am
Drupal Core Initiative Meetings Recap - November 04 - November 08, 2019 Lindsey Gemmill Tue, 11/12/2019 - 14:30
Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Our next Webinar: Test-Driven Development with Drupal & Cypress.io

12 November 2019 - 1:25am
In our upcoming webinar – Test-Driven Development with Drupal & Cypress.io – we will demonstrate how to use Cypress (and the respective integration module for Drupal) for Behaviour-Driven Development (BDD) to elevate the quality of your code and project.
Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: 7 reasons to migrate to Drupal 8 (and don’t wait for Drupal 9)

11 November 2019 - 8:46pm

This is the first article in the series devoted to the Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 end of life and the Drupal 9 release.

Here we will talk about why migration to Drupal 8 is a good idea for Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 websites’ owners. Also, we will tell why it’s not necessary to wait for the Drupal 9 release.

Read 7 reasons to migrate to Drupal 8 (and don’t wait for Drupal 9)

 

Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: PreviousNext's engagement with DrupalSouth and the Drupal Association Board

11 November 2019 - 8:20pm

Since co-founding PreviousNext in 2009 with Kim Pepper, our company has put a lot of focus into supporting the Drupal open source project and community at a regional and global level.

by Owen Lansbury / 12 November 2019

This has included a number of key initiatives, including:

  • Providing our team with up to 20% of their paid working hours to contribute code to Drupal core software and contributed modules. This has seen PreviousNext consistently rank in the Top 5 companies contributing code to Drupal at a global level, with several of our individual team members in the Top 100 contributing developers. 
  • Supporting our team to contribute time to voluntary groups that sustain the Drupal community, such as Drupal’s Security Team, running free Drupal training days and organising Drupal events.
  • Donating funds to the Drupal Association's supporting partner program, global initiatives like Promote Drupal, regional conferences and local meetups.
  • Funding our team to travel and speak or participate in regional and global Drupal conferences.

This support plays a key role in PreviousNext’s ability to attract and retain the best Drupal talent, facilitates trusted relationships with key members of the global Drupal community and maintains our reputation as Drupal experts in the eyes of prospective clients. In other words, strong support for Drupal pays dividends to maintain PreviousNext as a sustainable company.

After a decade of leading PreviousNext myself, long-term colleague Jason Coghlan took the reins as Managing Director in late 2018. Jason is responsible for all of PreviousNext’s operations and client engagements, which he manages in concert with our internal Leadership and Delivery teams. My ongoing role is to guide PreviousNext’s strategy, marketing and finances as Chair of our Executive Team, paired with enhanced engagement with the Drupal community.

The first initiative I’ve focused on in 2019 has been the formation of the DrupalSouth Steering Committee. DrupalSouth has been running as an annual conference in Australia and New Zealand since 2008 but had always been reliant on ad-hoc volunteers to take on the significant work to organise and run each event. The Steering Committee’s objective is to provide ongoing consistency for the annual conference whilst spearheading other initiatives that support and grow Drupal’s community and commercial ecosystem in the region. We’ll be presenting our initial ideas at DrupalSouth in Hobart in late November.

I’m also honoured to have been appointed to the global Drupal Association Board of Directors and just returned from my first board retreat before DrupalCon Amsterdam. The board works alongside the new Drupal Association Executive Director, Heather Rocker, on overall strategy and direction for her team of almost 20 staff to implement. I’ve been asked to chair the board’s Revenue Committee that oversees how the DA is funded through event attendance, sponsorships and other sources, and to sit on the Strategic Planning Committee that will define where the association's focus can be best directed. My initial term will run until 2022 with a frequent presence at DrupalCon North America and Europe in coming years.

Drupal Association Board & Staff at the Amsterdam retreat

Whilst in Amsterdam, I also sat in on round table discussions with other local Drupal associations from around the world, sharing ideas about how we can scale community engagement whilst leveraging common approaches and resources. A Supporting Partners round table focused more on the needs of Drupal services vendors and large users and a CEO dinner was a great insight into the state of Drupal businesses around the world. It was inspiring to see how professionally organised the global Splash Awards were and to understand how we might bring the initiative to our local region to recognise world-class projects being developed here. To cap things off, I had a talk accepted where I could share some of PreviousNext's experience winning and retaining long term clients - essentially all the things I wish someone had told me a decade ago!

With the upcoming release of Drupal 9 in mid 2020 there’s a high degree of optimism and confidence around Drupal’s immediate future. The software is a clear choice for enterprise and large organisations, Drupal services businesses are doing well and there’s a huge number of fresh and enthusiastic members of our community. While there’s some clear challenges ahead, I’m excited to be able to play a role in helping solve them at a global and regional level.

If you ever want to connect with me to discuss how I can help with your own Drupal community or business initiatives, feel free to get in touch via Drupal.org or Drupal Slack.

Tagged Drupal Association, DrupalCon
Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: PreviousNext's engagement with DrupalSouth and the Drupal Association Board

11 November 2019 - 8:20pm

Since co-founding PreviousNext in 2009 with Kim Pepper, our company has put a lot of focus into supporting the Drupal open source project and community at a regional and global level.

by Owen Lansbury / 12 November 2019

This has included a number of key initiatives, including:

  • Providing our team with up to 20% of their paid working hours to contribute code to Drupal core software and contributed modules. This has seen PreviousNext consistently rank in the Top 5 companies contributing code to Drupal at a global level, with several of our individual team members in the Top 100 contributing developers. 
  • Supporting our team to contribute time to voluntary groups that sustain the Drupal community, such as Drupal’s Security Team, running free Drupal training days and organising Drupal events.
  • Donating funds to the Drupal Association's supporting partner program, global initiatives like Promote Drupal, regional conferences and local meetups.
  • Funding our team to travel and speak or participate in regional and global Drupal conferences.

This support plays a key role in PreviousNext’s ability to attract and retain the best Drupal talent, facilitates trusted relationships with key members of the global Drupal community and maintains our reputation as Drupal experts in the eyes of prospective clients. In other words, strong support for Drupal pays dividends to maintain PreviousNext as a sustainable company.

After a decade of leading PreviousNext myself, long-term colleague Jason Coghlan took the reins as Managing Director in late 2018. Jason is responsible for all of PreviousNext’s operations and client engagements, which he manages in concert with our internal Leadership and Delivery teams. My ongoing role is to guide PreviousNext’s strategy, marketing and finances as Chair of our Executive Team, paired with enhanced engagement with the Drupal community.

The first initiative I’ve focused on in 2019 has been the formation of the DrupalSouth Steering Committee. DrupalSouth has been running as an annual conference in Australia and New Zealand since 2008 but had always been reliant on ad-hoc volunteers to take on the significant work to organise and run each event. The Steering Committee’s objective is to provide ongoing consistency for the annual conference whilst spearheading other initiatives that support and grow Drupal’s community and commercial ecosystem in the region. We’ll be presenting our initial ideas at DrupalSouth in Hobart in late November.

I’m also honoured to have been appointed to the global Drupal Association Board of Directors and just returned from my first board retreat before DrupalCon Amsterdam. The board works alongside the new Drupal Association Executive Director, Heather Rocker, on overall strategy and direction for her team of almost 20 staff to implement. I’ve been asked to chair the board’s Revenue Committee that oversees how the DA is funded through event attendance, sponsorships and other sources, and to sit on the Strategic Planning Committee that will define where the association's focus can be best directed. My initial term will run until 2022 with a frequent presence at DrupalCon North America and Europe in coming years.

Drupal Association Board & Staff at the Amsterdam retreat

Whilst in Amsterdam, I also sat in on round table discussions with other local Drupal associations from around the world, sharing ideas about how we can scale community engagement whilst leveraging common approaches and resources. A Supporting Partners round table focused more on the needs of Drupal services vendors and large users and a CEO dinner was a great insight into the state of Drupal businesses around the world. It was inspiring to see how professionally organised the global Splash Awards were and to understand how we might bring the initiative to our local region to recognise world-class projects being developed here. To cap things off, I had a talk accepted where I could share some of PreviousNext's experience winning and retaining long term clients - essentially all the things I wish someone had told me a decade ago!

With the upcoming release of Drupal 9 in mid 2020 there’s a high degree of optimism and confidence around Drupal’s immediate future. The software is a clear choice for enterprise and large organisations, Drupal services business are doing well and there’s a huge number of fresh and enthusiastic members of our community. While there’s some clear challenges ahead, I’m excited to be able to play a role in helping solve them at a global and regional level.

If you ever want to connect with me to discuss how I can help with your own Drupal community or business initiatives, feel free to get in touch via Drupal.org or Drupal Slack.

Tagged Drupal Association, DrupalCon
Categories: Drupal

Tag1 Consulting: Evaluating real-time collaborative editing solutions for a top Fortune 50 company

11 November 2019 - 3:00pm
Table of Contents What makes a collaborative editing solution robust? Decentralized vs. Centralized Architectures in Collaborative Editing Operational Transformation and Commutative Replicated Data Types (CRDT) Why Tag1 Selected Yjs Conclusion In today’s editorial landscape, content creators can expect not only to touch a document countless times to revise and update content, but also to work with other writers from around the world, often on distributed teams, to finalize a document collaboratively and in real time. For this reason, collaborative editing, or shared editing, has become among the most essential and commonly requested features for any content management solution straddling a large organization. Collaborative editing has long existed as a concept outside the content management system (CMS). Consider, for example, Google Docs, a service that many content creators use to write content together before copy-and-pasting the text into form fields in a waiting CMS. But in today’s highly demanding CMS landscape, shouldn’t collaborative editing be a core feature of all CMSs out of the box? Tag1 Consulting agreed, and the team decided to continue its rich legacy in CMS innovation by making collaborative editing a reality. Recently, the team at Tag1 Consulting worked with the technical leadership at a top Fortune... Read more preston Mon, 11/11/2019 - 15:00
Categories: Drupal

Gábor Hojtsy: The dramatic shift in how a Drupal upgrade is now done in Drupal 8 for Drupal 9

11 November 2019 - 1:51pm

I've had various deep discussions with contributed module maintainers recently about their process to update code to Drupal 9 and one point struck me. We are so attached to "Make it ready for Drupal 9" that a key point of the message may be lost. Check out this section of the State of Drupal keynote from DrupalCon Amsterdam 2019 where Dries Buytaert showcases Johanna's relatively simple site that she prepares for the Drupal 9 upgrade entirely in Drupal 8. Notice that she does all the steps in Drupal 8 other than the final Drupal 9 upgrade itself:

This is the base principle of the process towards Drupal 9, making your Drupal 8 site better and more prepared, so the move to Drupal 9 itself at the end is a relatively small step and you got a better Drupal 8 site in the meantime. You are not jumping over the fence all at once, but in gradual steps. I thought a comparison with Drupal 6 to 7, 7 to 8 and 8 to 9 would help, since people may have assumptions or prior experiences with those, so its worth looking at how our new process compares to the two previous transitions.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org - October 2019

11 November 2019 - 12:54pm

   

Select members of the Drupal Association team have just returned from a wonderful DrupalCon Amsterdam. The revival of the European DrupalCon was a tremendous success, and we want to thank all of the volunteers and sponsors who made it possible. 

The content at the conference was great as well. This year the core initiative leads provided a comprehensive update, followed by the traditional #Driesnote the next day, which laid out the vision for Drupal 9's key initiatives moving forward. The DA also shared an update from the Drupal Association board, held a community town hall, and provided our bi-annual update from the engineering team. 

While DrupalCon was action-packed, we also moved forward a lot of other initiatives on the community's behalf in October. 

Project News Reminder: Drupal 8.8.0 is coming soon! 

Drupal 8.8.0-beta1 was released in early November, to be followed by the full release in early December. A variety of great features are landing in version 8.8.0, including improved Composer support in core, an updated Media Library, and updates to JSON:API. This is likely to be the last minor release before the simultaneous release of Drupal 8.9.0 and Drupal 9.0.0 next June.  

If you want to help ensure a smooth release, we invite you to join the Drupal Minor Release beta testing program.

Time to get ready for Drupal 9

The time is now to get ready for Drupal 9. At DrupalCon Amsterdam the core initiative team put out the call for the community at large to get ready. 

If you are a site owner, the best way you can get ready is to make sure you're up to date on the latest version of Drupal 8. From there, it'll be an easy upgrade to 9. 

If you maintain a community module, or your own custom modules, you may have some work to do.  Many contributed or even custom modules only need a one-line change to be ready for Drupal 9. Check yours using: the upgrade status module, or the Drupal Check command line tool.

Drupal.org Update Automatic Updates Initiative needs your help!

For the last year we've been working together with the European Commission to bring automatic updates to Drupal. The first phase of this work covers updates for Drupal Core only, and only in non-Composer scenarios, but even so it should be able to protect many Drupal 8 and especially Drupal 7 site owners. 

The module is ready for testing now. Your feedback is welcome to help us make this first phase stable for production use by the community. 

You can also help by supporting Phase 2 of this initiative, which will include more advanced features like support for Composer-based sites, database updates, and a robust roll-back capability. We're looking for sponsors for this next round of work now. 

Forming a Contribution Recognition Committee

The Drupal Association's contribution credit system is an industry first in open source, and so we want to take great care on each step on this new journey. 

During the conference we also announced the formation of a Contribution Recognition Committee to govern the contribution credit algorithm which weights the order of the Drupal services marketplace on drupal.org. 

We are now seeking applications from community members who would like to sit on the committee. 

When will we enable GitLab merge requests?

When we migrated Drupal.org's git repositories to GitLab, it was the first step on the road to modernizing and improving the project's collaboration tools. The most significant step in that journey will be enabling merge requests, and we know it's a feature that the community has been waiting for. 

So what's the hold up? 

There are a few factors that have held us back from enabling the feature sooner. First, we were waiting for the GitLab team to add support for Git object de-duplication. Beta support for this feature was added in GitLab version 12.0, and then enabled by default beginning with the release of GitLab version 12.1.

While waiting for these features, the Drupal Association engineering team focused on other major commitments: moving forward the Automatic Updates initiative, in partnership with the European commission, co-leading the Composer Initiative to improve support in Drupal core, and preparing Drupal.org to support the release of Drupal 9. 

While these other initiatives have overtaken much of our internal capacity, we're hoping to get back to the merge request feature very soon, and we're just as excited to release the feature as you are to begin using it! 

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who make it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular, we want to thank: 

  • Zyxware - Renewing Signature Supporting Partner
  • EPAM - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
  • Datadog - Premium Technology Supporter
  • KWALL - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
  • ANNAI - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
  • SymSoft - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
  • Forum One - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
  • Catalyst IT - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
  • Old Moon Digital - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
  • Authorize.Net - *NEW* Classic Technology Supporter
  • SiteGround - Renewing Classic Hosting Supporter

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Categories: Drupal

Tag1 Consulting: Modern Rich Text Editors: How to Evaluate the Evolving Landscape

11 November 2019 - 12:00pm
Table of Contents What is a Rich Text Editor? The Modern Rich Text Editor and Emerging Challenges How we Evaluated Rich Text Editors Why Tag1 Selected ProseMirror Conclusion Among all of the components commonly found in content management systems (CMSs) and typical editorial workflows, the rich text editor is perhaps the one that occupies the least amount of space but presents the most headaches due to its unique place in content architectures. From humble beginnings in discussion forums and the early days of the web and word processing, the rich text editor has since evolved into a diverse range of technologies that support a lengthening list of features and increasingly rich integrations. Recently, Tag1 embarked on an exploration of rich text editors to evaluate solutions for a Fortune 50 company with demanding requirements. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at what impact the choice of a rich text editor can have down the line, some characteristics of the modern rich text editor, and Tag1’s own evaluation process. In the end, we discuss some of the rationales behind Tag1’s choice of ProseMirror as a rich text editor and some of the requirements leading to a decision that can serve... Read more preston Mon, 11/11/2019 - 12:00
Categories: Drupal

Evolving Web: Drupal North: Growth of the Drupal Ecosystem in Canada

10 November 2019 - 4:21pm

There’s never been a better time to be a Drupal user in Canada.

Since I started using Drupal in 2008, I’ve seen anecdotal evidence that Drupal is popular in Canada. Since 2006, and probably earlier, there have been active users groups in Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal, that organize regular conferences and meetups. These local groups are key to the Drupal community’s culture of open source and knowledge sharing. So I wasn’t surprised to learn that Canada is fourth in the world in terms of active users on Drupal.org (behind the US, Great Britain, and India).

Now, with the trend towards using Drupal for enterprise-level projects, the Canadian federal government, which has been using Drupal for years across a myriad of departments, is moving towards Drupal as the go-to platform for building digital experiences. It’s already being used by almost every government department you can think of in some capacity, but with the government's new Open First philosophy, Drupal is poised to become the default choice.

On November 21, Dries Buytaert (the founder of Drupal) will be in Ottawa talking about digital transformation for government. And at the 2019 DrupalCamp Ottawa this year (a sold-out event) I encountered a wave of government agencies eager to adopt Drupal for building the next wave of digital services and information portals for citizens and public servants. The ability to standardize on a platform that is secure, multilingual, and accessible, and also flexible enough to meet the needs of a whole range of applications and audiences is what makes Drupal so appealing. 

Recently, I’ve also seen growing momentum behind Drupal in the Quebec. Sites for Tourism Quebec, Viarail, and the Aéroports de Montréal are built with Drupal. And beyond public organizations, iconic Quebec brands like Agropur and Videotron are using Drupal for their large-scale web projects.

At Drupal North earlier this year (the largest Drupal event in Canada), I co-hosted a higher education summit that was attended by web managers and developers from some of the largest educational institutions in our country: the University of Toronto, McGill, Université Laval, and the University of Waterloo to name but a few. Many of these organizations also contribute to the Drupal project, sharing code, best practices, and techniques for scaling Drupal.

Even at non-Drupal web conferences, Drupal is a common topic of conversation. When I presented at year's #PSEWEB in Saskatoon (the Canadian version of HighEdWeb Conference), where I heard that the University of Calgary is continuing to re-platform their sites onto Drupal 8. 

Pantheon sponsored Drupal North this year, announcing that they would be expanding their hosting services to Canada, joining Acquia in catering to organizations that are mandated to host on Canadian soil or who want hosting close to home.

I'm looking forward to seeing the market for Drupal expand further in Canada. I'd love to hear your thoughts on how we can grow the community!

One thing we do at Evolving Web to keep Drupal growing is by providing Drupal training, including free community trainings online and at Drupal Camps, and more in-depth trainings. We have trainings coming up in Ottawa and Vancouver. And training on-demand in Toronto, Montreal, Quebec City, Calgary, Winnipeg, Halifax, Victoria, and your corner of Canada. Just give us a shout if we should do a training in your town.

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web
Categories: Drupal

Tandem's Drupal Blog: Migrating a Drupal 4.6 Site To VuePress

10 November 2019 - 4:00pm
November 11, 2019 With Lando and Symfony Console, migrating this legacy Drupal 4.6 site to VuePress was fairly straightforward. Overview Over the summer, Rachel Lawson sent out a tweet that a small non profit was looking to migrate their legacy Drupal site. I reached out and chatted with the people at interACT to learn more about this project. ...
Categories: Drupal

Pages