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Drupal core announcements: No Drupal core release on Wednesday, April 2

Planet Drupal - 30 March 2014 - 8:50pm

The monthly Drupal core bug fix release window is scheduled for this Wednesday. The last Drupal 7 bug fix release was three months ago, but there haven't been enough changes to the development version since then to warrant a new release. As a result, there won't be a Drupal 7 bug fix release this month. A bug fix release next month (in May) is likely.

Upcoming release windows include:

  • Wednesday, April 16 (security release window)
  • Wednesday, May 7 (bug fix release window)

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

Categories: Drupal

flink: Gorgeous Google map canvasses for your Drupal site: just Copy & Paste

Planet Drupal - 30 March 2014 - 1:48pm

I love maps. I love gardens too.

Not keen on gardening, though.

So while the Google Maps API allows you to create beautiful map styles, that doesn’t mean I enjoy spending hours or days doing that. Plus I don’t have the artistic prowess.

But the contributors of Snazzy Maps do.

Read more and drool...

File under:  Planet Drupal
Categories: Drupal

OhTheHugeManatee: Drupal Dev Days Szeged, or: Why You Should Attend Every Camp You Can

Planet Drupal - 29 March 2014 - 7:27am

Today is the last day of Drupal Dev Days in Szeged, Hungary, and I’ve never been more full of the “Drupal spirit!”

One of Drupal’s greatest strengths is the closness of its’ community, how friendly and accepting they can be. Drupalcons are highlight events for many, not because of the learning as much as because of the social track: the chance to see old friends and make new ones. Even more important is the chance to experience in person this incredibly friendly community. I always loved the cons because you could approach really anybody, say “hi”, and ask them about their work with the platform. Seriously, anybody. From a new user to Dries himself.

That’s become harder and harder as Drupal has grown more popular. In a convention of more than 3,000 people, you lose that feeling of being able to approach anybody. Instead, people silo into groups. In a best case it’s a group that shares an interest in a sub-system (Rules junkies, Panels proselytizers, Features fans…), but in most cases it’s because of shared connections outside the community. You end up hanging out with the same people you knew before the con. Of course you can still have fun, but that sense of community is lost.

One of the best parts of Drupal Dev Days Szeged was the way they encouraged people to mix, cross pollinate, and discuss. In a conference of 350 people I felt like I spoke to almost all of them. I could approach even the famous visitors and talk to them like a normal human being. I borrowed VGA adaptors from Gabor Hojtsy and Wim Leers, and neither of them batted an eye at it.

This kind of experience is so great, so positive and validating, that I recommend Drupal Camps for everyone. The ticket price is cheap, the location is always nearby, and the culture is fantastic. The sessions are every bit as good as most DrupalCon sessions (many of us use the Camps as a way to practice before the Con), and you will make great new friends.

Tl;DR: Drupal Dev Days in Szeged was fantastic. If you’ve never been to a Drupal Camp event, get your butt onto drupical.com and find your nearest one today!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: Drupal Training: The Self-Taught Solution

Planet Drupal - 28 March 2014 - 11:27am

In this blog series, we’re taking a little time to spotlight just a few of the many, many Drupal training options available today. With an emphasis on people in the community advocating Drupal and putting together programs to expand the community, we’re spotlighting a few of the dozens-- if not hundreds-- of fantastic training options out there.

Categories: Drupal

Entrepreneurship is 80% sales and marketing

Dries Buytaert - 28 March 2014 - 10:29am
Topic: Startup lessonsBusinessAcquia

Background in business is a 'nice to have', not a 'must have' for an aspiring entrepreneur. I had no solid business background when I founded Mollom or Acquia (I launched them roughly at the same time).

Other than the standard things (an idea, passion and the willingness to act), the most important thing that aspiring entrepreneurs need is the understanding that 80% of entrepreneurship is sales and marketing. If as a founder, you're not obsessed with sales and marketing, you're a liability rather than an asset.

You don't have to be the best sales and marketing guy (I am far from that), but you better enjoy getting other people excited about your project, company or product. It will help you not only with finding customers, but also with recruiting a world-class team, raising venture capital, and more. So if there is one thing you should learn before starting a company, it is "sales and marketing" (in the broad sense) — and you better be passionate about it, because you'll invest years of your life to selling and evangelizing to make your company a success. Without customers or a team, you won't need any other skills, because you'll be out of business.

You need to be talking about your idea all the time. Too many entrepreneurs believe that if they build a killer product, customers will come. It almost never works like that. Smart entrepreneurs do it backwards; they find customers first and build their product only when they have customers ready to start paying. Not testing the market by selling from day one can lead to months, if not years, of wasted time and money. So stop being so secretive about your idea. You will never find your product-market fit by keeping your idea secret until it is perfect. If you're afraid of people telling you that your idea is stupid, chances are you may not be ready to be an entrepreneur.

Categories: Drupal

Forum One: A closer look at Entity Forms

Planet Drupal - 28 March 2014 - 10:27am

Almost every project we work on requires a method for capturing user information. In most cases we have a Contact form and in more general purposes the client requires additional forms for various reasons. In the past our go to for creating forms was the Webforms module. As requirements have changed, so has the need for a web form solution that is exportable using Features.

In this series I will be walking you through an introduction to Entity Forms, including installing, configuring and creating an Entity Form from scratch. Later we will explore Exporting Entity Forms using Features and then follow up with integrating Entity Forms with Panels.

Why not Webforms?

The drawback of using the Webform module ((https://drupal.org/project/webform) is that there is no consistent port of this module to Drupal 8 and from an exportable solution you cannot use Features and Webform to easily migrate changes into code an on to a development or staging environment as Webforms are node based. While you could choose to use Webform Share (https://drupal.org/project/webform_share) to import and export Webform changes, this is not ideal for our development lfe cycle.

Advantages of using Entity Forms

This is where Entity Forms is starting to look like a more viable solution. Entity Forms if you are not familiar with them, enables the end user or developer to create front-end forms in a similar manner as Webforms. However, Entity Forms provide what I think is a more rich feature set.

  • Ability to attach any Drupal Field to the Forms

  • Ability to use most field based and entity aware modules.

  • You can download submitted data to XML and / or CSV data files using View Data Export.

  • Rules based form submission notifications. Allows for complex notifications logic.

  • Rules based form access control. Allows for complex access logic.

  • Use Views to create to an administrative listing of each Entityform type Submissions for fine grain control.

The Entity form module takes advantage of the Entity API, allowing for use of the Field UI and some consistency with how we are already developing. Oh, and they are exportable as well using Features, which make placing them in code advantageous for continuous integration.

 

Installing Entity Forms

Like most modules, Entity Forms can be found at Drupal.org and downloaded by browsing to (https://drupal.org/project/entityform). Feel free to choose the download version that is right for you. For sake of demonstration I will be using the 7.x-2.0-beta2 version along with Drush to download the module into my “sites/all/modules/contrib” folder.

Note: If you do not have a “contrib” folder under your “modules” directory, you can create one or simply place the downloaded module directly into the “modules” folder.

 

One we have the module downloaded we need to navigate to “admin/modules” and enable the “Entityforms” module. Keep in mind that Entityforms has dependencies of “Entity API, Views, Chaos tools, Field UI, Field and Field SQL storage”, so you will also need to download and install the dependencies. If you want to have Forms send email to users you will also need to download and install the Rules module and finally since Entityforms uses the Fields UI, you may want to download and configure the “Email Field” module.

Configuring Entity Forms

Entityforms work much like that of a Content type in that you can configure them by creating an entityform type and add fields to it. If we navigate to “admin/structure/entityform_types” we can begin to create a new Entityform as shown in the following image.

 

 

Creating an Entity Form

For demonstration purposes we will create a new “Contact” form. To begin creating an Entityform click on “Add entityform type” and fill out the fields as shown in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Name - Human readable name of our form.

  2. Redirect path - Relative path that a user is redirected to upon submission..

  3. Intro form instructions - User instructions you want to display.

 

We now are presented with multiple settings on how our new form will function. We will need to complete some or all of these sections so let’s review those now.

Access settings

Access settings control who can submit a form, whether a form is open for submissions and whether a form can be resubmitted by the same user. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Form status - Can users submit the form. Value allows for form submission to be open or closed.

  2. Roles - Roles that can submit our new form.

  3. Resubmit action - Action to take if logged in user has already submitted our form.

Submission page settings

Submission settings control the page title and response that a user will see upon successfully submitting a form. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Preview Page - Boolean value to show a preview page to user when they are about to submit a form.

  2. Submission page title - Page title displayed after form is submitted.

  3. Submission reply - The text that will be displayed to user upon form submission.

  4. Show submission information - Boolean value to show user submission form data.

 

Submission views

Submission views allow you to specify the view used to display submission reports to both the admin and end user. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. View for submission reports - Select the view that should be used for Submission reports. These views are customizable.

  2. View for current user’s submissions - Select the view that should be used to show users their previous submissions.

 

Draft settings

Draft settings control whether a form can have multiple drafts prior to actually submitting it. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Draftable - Boolean value to specify whether a user can save a draft of the form.

  2. Override drat button text - Text to use for draft save button.

  3. Draft save text - Text to be displayed to user when the form is saved as a draft.

 

Menu settings

Menu settings control whether a form has a link on a specific menu for user to navigate to. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Provide a menu link - Boolean value to provide a menu link for form.

  2. Menu link title - Title of menu link that will be displayed.

  3. Description - Alt or Title attribute that will display when hovering over menu link.

  4. Parent item - Menu that men link will belong to.

  5. Weight - Specified order of menu link within menu.

 

URL path settings

URL path settings control the url alias for both submitting the form and the confirmation page once a form has been submitted. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Submit URL alias - URL where user can find the form.

  2. Confirm URL alias - URL user is taken to upon submitting the form. This will display a page with the settings from the “Submission page settings”.

 

Form overrides

Form overrides allows you to change some of the default values of the form including the submit button text, confirmation text and titles. The controls contain the following fields and you can view the defaults I have selected in the following image.

 

 

 

 

  1. Submit Button Text – Text to use for submit button

  2. Submission confirmation Text – Text to use for Submission Confirmation

  3. Your Submissions Text – Text to use for “Your Submissions” page

  4. Form Disallow Resubmit Text – Text to use for “You already submitted this form”

  5. Submission Delete Text –Text to use for “Delete Confirmation”

  6. Submission View Title – Text to use for page title of submission view

 

Now that we have configured our Contact form we need to add fields to it for the user to be able to input information that will be submitted. Since Entityforms utilizes the Fields UI, we should be pretty comfortable in adding fields.

Managing fields

To manage fields we need to simply navigate to the “Manage Fields” tab and add our fields as shown in the following image.

 

 

 

For our particular Contact form we added the following fields.

  1. Name - Text field with the default settings.

  2. Email - Email field with the default settings.

  3. Subject - Text field with the default settings.

  4. Message - Long text field with the default settings.

 

Finally let’s preview what our form look like by browsing to the Contact link we provided earlier in our settings as shown in the following image.

 

 

 

 

Summary


We covered a lot of information in a short period of time. Including how to download and install the Entityforms module and the dependencies it has to configure properly. We looked at configuring a new Entityform with proper settings and finished off by adding the fields through the Fields UI and previewing our new form. Next time we will look at configuring the Rules module for allowing Entityforms to notify uses by emailing them that a form has been submitted.

 

 

 

 

Almost every project we work on requires a method for capturing user information. In most cases we have a Contact form and in more general purposes the client requires additional forms for various reasons. In the past our go to for creating forms was the Webforms module. As requirements have changed, so has the need for a web form solution that is exportable using Features. In this series we will be walking taking a closer look at Entityforms.

 

 

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Our Drupal Developer Days Szeged Slides

Planet Drupal - 28 March 2014 - 8:45am
Overwriting code in Drupal

On Thursday Vasi (vasi1186) highlighted methods how to overwrite the default behaviour of Drupal's core and some of the well known contributed modules.

Manage and Deploy your sites with Drush

In his session Bastian (dasrecht) explained how to setup Drush to work with remote sites and how we use it in our daily business. 

Get ready for full translated sites with Entity Translation

Drupal 8 will require only only one module for translation: Entity Translation. Michael (Schnitzel) presented our biggest learning with Drupal 7's version of the module and how by using it the transition to Drupal 8 will be significantly easier.

Pro tip: For the full experience of his presentation's animated cat content gif goodness, which Slideshare doesn't support, you can download his Keynote slides here.

Stay in touch – join our newsletter!  

 

Categories: Drupal

Darren Mothersele: Drupal Theme Generator Demo

Planet Drupal - 27 March 2014 - 5:00pm

I've been playing with the idea of automatically generating Drupal themes from static HTML/CSS/JS using annotations in the HTML markup. I put together a basic proof-of-concept of a tool to generate a Drupal theme, ctools layout and style plugins, and view modes and templates.

Last night at the Drupal Show and Tell event in London I gave a live demo of the theme generator in action. The event was recorded, so will be online eventually, but for now I've recorded this demo as a couple of attendees suggested this would give a better idea of the detail that couldn't be seen on the screen during the live demo.

My interest in this area came about through wanting to bring design into the development workflow of an agile project, and move away from the 'throw it over the fence' mentality in design deliverables. You can read more about how this came about in my previous blog post Death of the Themer.

Assembly, not Deconstruction

Traditionally implementation of a design was done via a process of deconstruction from a PSD into flat HTML and CSS, and then another process of deconstruction in CMS implementation of the design. You can't design a responsive site in Photoshop so luckily this is changing. PSDs were horrible to work with as amends take far too long, and while Photoshop may be good to quickly mock up style ideas, pages designed in Photoshop tend rely too much on intuition, implications about how things would work, and tend to come with an implied "you get the idea".

Atomic Design

As I've mentioned in earlier posts, I'm excited about the emerging trend towards atomic design (see Brad Frost) as it brings a more 'development' style process into design. Treating the process as that of designing a system of re-usable components, rather than just designing pages.

This moves implementation of a design from a process of deconstruction, to a process of assembly, so brings the world of dev and design closer together. Either bringing design into the development workflow, or bringing development processes into design (depending on which way around you look at it).

With an atomic approach to design, and with something like SMACSS for modular CSS, the process of converting to a Drupal theme can be automated. Because the markup/styles are 'componentised' we can annotate the source code to document the conversion process and then use automated tools to manage the process.

Demo

Here's a demo of the proof-of-concept:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/90315757 Next...

You can download/fork the code from the GitHub Hyde repo. You'll need to patch the QueryPath module as it needs the latest version of the QueryPath library and the QP module doesn't include the right files to make this work by default.

A lot of work needs to be done. This is very rough proof-of-concept code, but I think this shows the concept can work, and worthy of further development.

Some feedback from last night included:

  • Generate an actual theme. At the moment the theme is just an object stored in the DB/cache, but I had planned for this to be a ctools exportable. An earlier version I started working on generated actual theme files, perhaps it would be better to switch back to this approach?
  • How to handle logic in template files? Shouldn't this be handled in pre-process?
  • Stub code generation for pre-process functions
  • Adding extra custom fields for display only? The example given was a date field that was displayed twice on page, once for date stored in field and once for time stored in same field.

Drop me a line if you've got any other ideas, or want to get involved, or want to help fund building this properly! :)

Categories: Drupal

Drupal governance announcements: Proposed Conflict Resolution Policy

Planet Drupal - 27 March 2014 - 2:40pm

For some time we've had a bit of unfinished business around the Drupal Code of Conduct around how we manage and respond to conflict.

The Community Working Group has drafted a policy and is now looking for community feedback over the next 2 weeks. Please check out the draft in the drupal-cwg issue queue.

https://drupal.org/node/2227717

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: An Updated Look for the Drupal Association

Planet Drupal - 27 March 2014 - 1:54pm

You may have noticed over the last several weeks we have begun rolling out updated badges for memberships and our partner programs. (You can see the full line-up of new badges here.)

We’re sprucing up our membership badges as part of an iterative effort to update some of the visual branding for the Association - more on that in a moment.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Druapalcamp Atlanta 2014 ... Postponed?

Planet Drupal - 27 March 2014 - 11:34am

Yesterday, we announced to the local Atlanta Drupal community that Mediacurrent would not be playing a lead organizational role in Drupalcamp Atlanta 2014. Below is the email I shared with the member list from the Atlanta Drupal User Group:

Categories: Drupal

High Rock Media: Drupal Theming: Adding Font Awesome Icons to Menu Items

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 8:23pm

I'm currently working on a Drupal build where I'd like users to be able to trivially add icons to menu items through the UI. Enter FontAwesome, the scalable vector icon font that leverages the power of CSS. That in combo with the infamous Menu Attributes module allows users to add custom classes to Drupal menu items via the Menu edit interface on a per menu item basis. This is ideal for what we need to accomplish.

Install Menu Attributes

First, grab the Menu Attributes module and enable it either via Drush or download and enable it via the modules admin page. Once you enable Menu Attributes, visit /admin/structure/menu/settings and be sure that the "Classes" attribute is enabled. Now, you'll see this as a text field for any given menu item when editing those.

Get Font Awesome

Now, we need to add Font Awesome and for the sake of this tutorial, I'll use the CDN version which we can add to our theme using a preprocess function. As aways, unless you're building a custom module, add the preprocess function to your theme's template.php file or create one if you don't have one already. For my preprocess function, I can use hook_page_build with drupal_add_css.

function MYTHEME_framework_page_build(&$vars) {
    // Add font awesome cdn.
    drupal_add_css('//netdna.bootstrapcdn.com/font-awesome/4.0.3/css/font-awesome.css', array('type' => 'external'));
}

Be sure to replace MYTHEME with the actual machine_name of your theme and clear cache. If all went well, you'll now have Font awesome available to use. Note, you can also download Font Awesome and self-host it as an alternative to the CDN version.

Add the Icon Classes

The next step is to add some icon classes to your menu items via the Menu Attributes classes field. To see what icons are available to you, refer to the Font Awesome "Cheat Sheet" on their site. I'll add a "home" icon next to my home link so I simply edit the home link and add this to the classes field typically located at /admin/structure/menu/manage/main-menu:

fa fa-home

Style away

Above, the first fa instantiates Font Awesome and fa-home selects your icon. This will need a bit of theming and I found a few caveats as well. Since the class is added to your menu's "a" link, you'll want to define your font for the menu link itself and for the icon which gets added via a CSS "before" class. So if your menu id is primary-nav, you can do this:

#primary-nav a.fa {
 font-family: arial, sans-serif;
}

#primary-nav a.fa:before {
 margin-right: 1em;
  font-family: FontAwesome;
}

One issue I ran in to was that Firefox had trouble rendering the icons from the CDN and it's a documented issue apparently. To solve this, you may need to define Font Awesome in your theme's CSS via the @font-face attribute with an absolute path to the CDN -- that solved it for me. Beyond this, you can style and color as needed all the while using CSS. That's pretty much all you need to do so as you can see it makes it trivial for users to add their own icons to menus.

Tags 
  • CSS
  • Theming
  • Design Patterns
  • Drupal
  • Drupal Planet
Resources 
Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon Austin News: Last Call for DrupalCon Austin Sponsors!

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 2:14pm


The deadline for DrupalCon Austin sponsorships is coming up quickly on April 1.

Sponsor funds help the Drupal Association produce an amazing event. Also, we’re expecting a great turnout at DrupalCon Austin, and sponsorship provides companies with unique opportunities to get noticed at Drupal’s largest North American gathering.

Categories: Drupal

Acquia: Getting the most out of a code sprint - DrupalSouth shows us how

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 1:57pm

The DrupalSouth code sprint was a huge success and a standout feature of an already excellent conference. I put this down to some ingenuity and some great preparation. I interrupted two of the people who made it all happen, Dan "dman" Morrison and Heike "HeikeT" Theis from Wellington, New Zealand, to get to know them better and talk about how they put together the code sprint at DrupalSouth.

Categories: Drupal

Nikro: Moldcamp - a DrupalCamp you do not want to miss

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 10:59am

It's been a while since I've organised the 1st Drupal event in Moldova (to be precise 7 of January 2011 - Drupal 7 Release Party).
Lots of Drupal events took place since then. And now, we're aiming even higher: first Drupal Camp in Moldova...

Tags: 
Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Enter to Win Free Admission to the Great Wide Open Conference

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 10:22am

Great Wide Open is a conference featuring 45 minute sessions and 1.5 hour workshops exploring Open Source, Open Tech, and the Open Web in the Enterprise.  It will feature some of the world's top developers, technologists and decision makers, including yours truly, the Mediacurrent team. We'd love to send you there for free. Enter to win one of 8 registrations for the conference. See you there!


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Drupal Developer Days Szeged: The sprints

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 9:01am

We are coming to the end of the dedicated sprint days at Drupal Developer Days Szeged. Let’s take a look at the success we’ve had so far.

Sprinters started arriving early on Monday morning and by the end of the first day the two sprint rooms were almost full. 

A third sprint room had to be added to the roster on Wednesday as we were out of space on Tuesday evening. To give you a good idea on numbers the total number of sprinters so far is over 150!

There’s a great vibe in the sprint rooms. Everyone has been saying how well organised the sprints are. Everyone’s enthusiasm to work on Drupal is sky high.

@drupaldevdays Wow!! You really rock #drupaldevdays organization. I'm impressed about how you are taking care of us. Thanks!! <3

— Ruben Teijeiro (@rteijeiro) March 26, 2014

Ymbra team is sprinting in migrate and frontend on #drupaldevdays Very excited for all work done here these days!

— Ymbra (@ymbra_co) March 26, 2014

The sprints have covered many initiatives for Drupal 8 and Drupal.org with huge progress being made already. Since Monday many new contributors have worked on Drupal 8 and have already had their work committed to core.

oh, and the one i reviewed yesterday at #drupaldevdays was already commited. my work matters! yay! :)

— aboros (@hunaboros) March 26, 2014

The number of core commits this week so far has passed the 90, and it’s going up at a speedy rate. Many thanks to Webchick, AlexPott, and Catch who have been working around the clock to commit everyone's hard work.

Here are some highlights of the week so far:

  • The Frontend sprint needed to mass relocate as so many people turned up. They are now in a bigger location taking up half a sprint room.
  • The Beta Blocker Bunnies working hard to reach the Beta release of Drupal 8.

Beta blocker bunnies sprinting at #DrupalDevDays! pic.twitter.com/EkTGa4U67p

— xjm (@xjmdrupal) March 24, 2014

  • A special mention for the coffee. Free latte macchiatos (hand delivered by Gabor Hotsy if you ask him nicely).
  • Everyone regrouping after dinner for late night coding in the sprint rooms until being made to leave.

Almost midnight and we still have a room full of people working on various #drupal stuff. Rock on. #drupaldevdays pic.twitter.com/hDVsJSfgSa

— Mori Sugimoto (@dokumori) March 25, 2014

More photos of the Drupal Developer Days can be found in our Flickr set.

Categories: Drupal

Appnovation Technologies: Make Your Life Easier with Coffee!

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 8:30am
Well it's not exactly caffeine, but it is a hidden gem of a module. Coffee is a contributed module that allows users to navigate through Drupal admin faster. var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
Categories: Drupal

Do well and do good

Dries Buytaert - 26 March 2014 - 7:38am
Topic: DrupalAcquiaBusiness

This blog post is on purpose, Open Source, profit and pie. This week I had an opportunity to meet Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum. I was inspired by the following comment he made (not his exact words):

"Because companies strive to have a positive balance sheet, they take more in, than they give out. However, as individuals, we define success as giving more than you take. Given that many of us are leaders as individuals *and* also leaders in our businesses, we often wrestle with these opposing forces. Therein lies the leadership challenge."

I’ve seen many Open Source developers struggle with this as they are inherently wired to give back more than they take. Open Source developers often distrust businesses, sometimes including their own employer, because they take more than they give back. They believe businesses just act out of greed and self-interest.

This kind of corporate distrust comes from the “fixed-pie concept"; that there is only so much work or resources to go around, and as pieces of the pie are taken by some, there is less left for everyone else. The reality is that businesses are often focused on expanding the pie. As the pie grows, there is more for everyone. It is those who believe in the "expanding-pie concept" who can balance the opposing forces. It is those who believe in the "fixed-pie concept" who worry about their own self-interests and distrust businesses.

Imagine a business that is born out of a desire to improve the world, that delivers real value to everyone it touches. A business that makes employees proud and where team members are passionate and committed. A business that aspires to do more than just turn a profit. A business that wants to help fuel a force of good. That is Acquia for me. That should be your employer for you (whoever your employer is).

The myth that profit maximization is the sole purpose of business is outdated, yet so many people seem to hold on to it. I started Acquia because I believed in the potential and transformative nature of Drupal and Open Source. The purpose of business is to improve our lives and create value for all stakeholders.

Acquia's growth and capital position has given me power and responsibility. Power and responsibility that has enabled me to give back more and grow the pie. I have seen the power that businesses have to improve the world by accelerating the power of good, even if they have to take more than they give. It's a story worth telling because business is not a zero-sum game with one winner. I believe Open Source companies are in a prime position to balance the opposing forces. We can do well and do good.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Do well and do good

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2014 - 7:38am
Topic: DrupalAcquiaBusiness

This blog post is on purpose, Open Source, profit and pie. This week I had an opportunity to meet Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum. I was inspired by the following comment he made (not his exact words):

"Because companies strive to have a positive balance sheet, they take more in, than they give out. However, as individuals, we define success as giving more than you take. Given that many of us are leaders as individuals *and* also leaders in our businesses, we often wrestle with these opposing forces. Therein lies the leadership challenge."

I’ve seen many Open Source developers struggle with this as they are inherently wired to give back more than they take. Open Source developers often distrust businesses, sometimes including their own employer, because they take more than they give back. They believe businesses just act out of greed and self-interest.

This kind of corporate distrust comes from the “fixed-pie concept"; that there is only so much work or resources to go around, and as pieces of the pie are taken by some, there is less left for everyone else. The reality is that businesses are often focused on expanding the pie. As the pie grows, there is more for everyone. It is those who believe in the "expanding-pie concept" who can balance the opposing forces. It is those who believe in the "fixed-pie concept" who worry about their own self-interests and distrust businesses.

Imagine a business that is born out of a desire to improve the world, that delivers real value to everyone it touches. A business that makes employees proud and where team members are passionate and committed. A business that aspires to do more than just turn a profit. A business that wants to help fuel a force of good. That is Acquia for me. That should be your employer for you (whoever your employer is).

The myth that profit maximization is the sole purpose of business is outdated, yet so many people seem to hold on to it. I started Acquia because I believed in the potential and transformative nature of Drupal and Open Source. The purpose of business is to improve our lives and create value for all stakeholders.

Acquia's growth and capital position has given me power and responsibility. Power and responsibility that has enabled me to give back more and grow the pie. I have seen the power that businesses have to improve the world by accelerating the power of good, even if they have to take more than they give. It's a story worth telling because business is not a zero-sum game with one winner. I believe Open Source companies are in a prime position to balance the opposing forces. We can do well and do good.

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