Drupal

Promet Source: Great Websites are Created before the First Line of Code is Written

Planet Drupal - 4 hours 46 min ago
When you’re surrounded by a team of awesome developers, you might think that a statement such as, “Great Websites are Created before the First Line of Code is Written,” isn’t going to be met with a lot of enthusiasm. As it turns out, our developers tend to be among the greatest supporters of the kind of Human-Centered Design engagements that get all stakeholders on the same page and create a roadmap for transformative possibilities. 
Categories: Drupal

Spinning Code: SC DUG May 2019

Planet Drupal - 6 hours 45 min ago

For this month’s SC DUG, Mauricio Orozco from the South Carolina Commission for Minority Affairs shared his notes and lessons learned during his first DrupalCon North America.

We frequently use these presentations to practice new presentations, try out heavily revised versions, and test out new ideas with a friendly audience. If you want to see a polished version checkout our group members’ talks at camps and cons. So if some of the content of these videos seems a bit rough please understand we are all learning all the time and we are open to constructive feedback.

If you would like to join us please check out our up coming events on Meetup for meeting times, locations, and connection information.

Categories: Drupal

Srijan Technologies: Site Owner’s Guide to a Smooth Drupal 9 Upgrade Experience

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2019 - 11:39pm

While upgrading to the latest version is always part of the best practice, the process can be staggering.

Drupal 8.7 is already here and 9 will be released in a year, in June 2020.

Although a lot of discussion is happening around the upgrade and possibilities it brings along, the final product can only be as good as the process itself.

The good and important news is that moving from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 should be really easy — radically easier than migrating from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8.

As a site owner, here’s what you need to know about the new release and what to take care of to make the process easier without many glitches.

Categories: Drupal

Typed Link

New Drupal Modules - 18 May 2019 - 9:56am
Use Case

The original use case for needed this module was a website needed to store a lot of files on a seperate CDN with no API access.

In order to make these files available a link field could be easily used but we wanted to be able to add icons to the links. This is where the drop down category comes in.

How it works

This field extends the link field, widget and formatter. It uses the text list field for applying a link type.

Categories: Drupal

Configure

New Drupal Modules - 18 May 2019 - 6:14am
Categories: Drupal

Clemens Tolboom: Working on a Drupal module using composer

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2019 - 2:10am

Altering Drupals composer.json to fetch a particular Drupal module git checkout.

Categories: Drupal

Google Login Handler

New Drupal Modules - 17 May 2019 - 2:21pm
Categories: Drupal

ACH Attach JS

New Drupal Modules - 17 May 2019 - 12:01pm

ACH Attach JS is a module that helps to better integrate a Drupal site with Acquia Lift and Acquia Content Hub.

When Lift adds content to the page (asynchronously) from Content Hub, your js does not automatically run on the new markup. That's a problem if the new content has tabs or a drawer or a save flag or any other feature that requires javascript. This module solves that problem.

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Introducing Support & Maintenance at Lullabot

Planet Drupal - 17 May 2019 - 11:33am

In our booth during DrupalCon Seattle this year, we had the pleasure of speaking with people in the Drupal community about our new Support & Maintenance offering. The response we heard most often was, “Doesn’t Lullabot already do support and maintenance?” The short answer is yes.

Categories: Drupal

Layout Builder Margin

New Drupal Modules - 17 May 2019 - 9:05am
Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs Sets Plugins

New Drupal Modules - 17 May 2019 - 8:30am

This adds a data transform plugin system to Paragraphs Sets by wrapping that module's data_alter hooks.

The annotated plugins operate kinda sorta like migration process plugins. Currently include plugins:

- `simple`: an identity plugin
- `create_entity`: construct nested entities for an entity reference field

For example, in a paragraphs set, we want a paragraph that references custom entities to prepopulate (i.e., create) the entities:

Categories: Drupal

SAML Extras

New Drupal Modules - 17 May 2019 - 8:09am

The SAML extras module allows to map user fields with simpleSAMLphp attributes during user authentication.
Once attributes are mapped, the module calls the 'hook_simplesamlphp_auth_user_attributes' to save the values into user fields after login.
This module implements the functionality requested in the following sandbox project: SimpleSAMLphp Custom Attribute Mapping

Categories: Drupal

Hook 42: Drupaldelphia: The Jawn That Never Disappoints

Planet Drupal - 17 May 2019 - 6:49am
Drupaldelphia: The Jawn That Never Disappoints Lindsey Gemmill Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:49
Categories: Drupal

myDropWizard.com: Experimental Composer repository with CKEditor plugins

Planet Drupal - 17 May 2019 - 6:49am

In my experience, a big part of making a Drupal 8 site usable for content editors is customizing the WYSIWYG, which usually includes adding a couple additional CKEditor plugins.

Of course, you can simply download the plugins into the 'libraries' folder, and that's fine. But these days, it's becoming best practice to pull in all of your site's dependencies using Composer.

Adding 'package' repositories to your composer.json for the CKEditor plugins (the current best practice) works fine - but only for your individual site.

It doesn't work so well if you want to install:

  • A Drupal "Feature" (like with the Features module) that configures the WYSIWYG, including adding some CKEditor plugins, or
  • A Drupal distribution (like Panopoly or Lightning)

In those cases, you can't depend on what the individual site may have in its top-level composer.json, and asking the user to manually copy-paste a bunch of 'package' repositories in there may create enough confusion or problems that potential users will just give up.

Well, I've got an possible solution to this problem: an experimental Composer repository which includes CKEditor plugins for use on a Drupal site.

It works better for Feature modules and distributions, but can also make life easier for individual sites too.

Read more to find out how it works and how to use it!

Categories: Drupal

ThinkShout: The Problems In Tech Go Deeper Than ‘Hacking’

Planet Drupal - 17 May 2019 - 5:00am

Earlier this week, The Cut ran a piece about a “Tinder Hacker” who created a fake profile with his roommate’s photos, then hooked a piece of code up to the Tinder API and did some very simple string substitutions so that men who messaged “her”–after “she” swiped right on them–were tricked into actually talking to other men who did the same. In brief, he put strangers in contact with each other under false pretenses, rerouted and surveilled their communications without consent, and proceeded to use this as a bragging point on dates and in interviews.

One might take exception to a number of elements of this story, but let’s start with its terminology. “Hacking” is a word whose meaning has broadened beyond all practical use, but in no sense did “Sean”, the pseudonymous subject of the story, “hack Tinder.” He relied on someone else’s reverse engineering to write some buggy code that ran against its API. That’s all.

The article itself seems confused about whether the Tinder API, or Application Program Interface, only exists to allow homebrew apps on Windows Phone. But an API is just a set of commands made available by a server, like the Tinder mothership, to accept instructions from client apps, like the many copies of the Tinder app that run on all kinds of phones. Almost all the apps on your phone are clients that work this way, and APIs are ubiquitous. Even the Drupal and Wordpress sites we build each have their own versions.

The code described in the article fits less within the definition of a hack than that of a bot. It would live on a server, persist as a service, wait for triggers–like incoming messages–and then respond to them according to certain rules. Some bots are used for automated customer service; some are used for art projects; some are used for jokes. Many, many, many bots are used for spam or other malicious purposes.

The ethics of bot development are not always simple, but they’re not new territory either. That’s the second and most glaring exception to be taken here: Sean’s assertion that his bot was at the “gray hat” level of malice in terms of its exploitation of code. Bot creator and Portland local Darius Kazemi wrote a thoughtful piece about considering and refining the possibility space of joke bots toward kindness in 2015. That in turn references fellow creator Leonard Richardson’s seminal 2013 post “Bots Should Punch Up”, which contains a telling bit with regard to the color of that hat:

“Hackers and comedians and artists are always attracted to the grey areas. But your bot is an extension of your will, and if you're a white guy like me, most of the grey areas are not grey in your favor.”

Perhaps it’s assuming too much to conclude that Sean, a San Francisco programmer whose race is not mentioned in the article, is a white guy. Perhaps not. Technology as a field in the US is overwhelmingly full of white men, offering most of the benefits of the biggest wealth creation engine in history to the people who were already granted our society’s highest levels of privilege. That privilege, and power, means that thoughtless choices have more potential to do harm: by default, they’re punching down.

But even if that weren’t the case, as an educated and socialized human adult, it shouldn’t have been hard to see that writing a service solely to entice, deceive, manipulate and mock people in a vulnerable space like a dating app might have consequences. That is, unless you’ve spent a career being rewarded for ignoring consequences, because you work in tech. That’s the third exception to be taken. For pulling a prank like this, many people would be fired or sued. Instead, Sean got a better job.

I can admit that this story struck me on a personal level. Back before I had to quit Twitter, I used to write bots using their API myself. One of them, which I created in 2014, worked on a similar principle to the Tinder bot: it would receive a person’s message, put it in holding, and send them back a random held message from someone else in response. The juxtapositions were surreal, delightful, and often rewarding. And everyone involved was informed, consenting, and able to make use of built-in safety tools to report bad actors.

I’m not an ethicist or a researcher by training, but I knew to consider those aspects of my work because I have an interest in the history of the internet. According to the article, Sean does too–I’m willing to bet he and I read the same books about phone phreaks, blue boxes and Captain Crunch.

The phreakers he admires, by the way, were indeed “punching up” with their pranks–using low-rent tools to get one back at Bell, an exploitative tech monopoly that would eventually be broken up. Hey, there’s an idea.

People have made infamously bad choices like Sean’s before, and one might expect creators here in the future to work at avoiding their repetition. But instead, his story reflects the broader attitude of a tech sector that is not just ahistorical, but willfully naive and ignorant of the lessons of its past. (If you only read one thing linked in this whole piece, make it that last one. Go ahead, I’ll wait.)

The things I value about working at ThinkShout stand in opposition to all of that. My colleagues here are technical experts, but they’re also widely read, deeply informed, and always working to expand our collective view of the world in inclusive and considerate ways. That’s why we take pride in supporting progressive organizations like the Campaign Legal Center and ChangeLab Solutions. That’s why we focus on accessibility for all users as a core concern and increasing equity in our own job pipeline. That’s why we’re fine with being located far outside the insular centers of big tech culture, where it seems like people would rather try to land on the Moon than make change on the ground.

Even if the article in The Cut highlights the deep problems in the technology sphere that engulfs us all, there are certainly worse things on the internet than a man getting his kicks by trolling a bunch of other men. But there are better things too. If you’d prefer to join us on that side, please get in touch! We’re hiring, and we’d be glad to hear about how your hobby project brought a little kindness and empathy to the world.

Categories: Drupal

Smart Trim Readmore

New Drupal Modules - 17 May 2019 - 3:45am

The module provides a field formatter that displays a text of field as trimmed text with read more/read less links.

Dependencies

The module depends on Smart Trim module.

Categories: Drupal

hCaptcha

New Drupal Modules - 16 May 2019 - 6:52pm

hCaptcha is a drop-in replacement for reCAPTCHA that earns website owners money and helps companies get their data labeled.

Categories: Drupal

JSON:API Comment

New Drupal Modules - 16 May 2019 - 2:00pm

Out-of-the-box, the JSON:API module works with the Comment module to provide HTTP resources for retrieving, updating and deleting comments in a very generic way. This module adds additional JSON:API compliant routes that enhance the developer experience of creating progressively decoupled or fully decoupled comment functionality.

Some (or all) of this module's features and enhancements may be merged into Drupal core. At that point, this module will become obsolete and deprecated.

Set up Installation

Download it and enable it! Done.

Categories: Drupal

Duo Consulting: A Better Way to Search in Drupal

Planet Drupal - 16 May 2019 - 1:04pm

One of the best things about Drupal’s open-source ecosystem is that it empowers you to be open-minded. Given the vast array of solutions and modules available, users can customize their site to their whims. Alternatively, if you think up and code something new, your contributions can be shared online with other users. With all of the customization available, Drupal is a conducive platform for outside-the-box thinking.

Decoupling is a recent example of this philosophy. Where a standard Drupal website would feature a Drupal-powered front and backend, decoupling opens the door for a variety of possibilities. A decoupled site can utilize different platforms and technologies for both the front and backend. For example, a decoupled site could utilize Drupal’s backend CMS while running a React-powered frontend. Such is Drupal’s flexibility that it can power scores of different, user-facing channels from a single backend, including other sites, native apps, Internet of Things (IoT), and more.

This decoupled or “headless” concept has more applications than just for site design, though. The search function of a website, for one, can benefit from components that utilize this headless approach – and not a moment too soon. As Google has begun to sunset its Google Search Appliance offering, there is now a need for an open and flexible search tool with enterprise-level capabilities.

At this year’s Midwest Drupal Camp, the team from Palantir demonstrated that a decoupled approach to site search was viable. This solution, federated search, allows for indexing and searching across multiple sites. For organizations with a large web portfolio across different platforms, this open federated search solution can fill the gap left by Google.

Understanding why federated search for Drupal is important requires an understanding of how regular site search functions operate. At the core, the search feature is built from three different components: the source, index and results. The source simply refers to all of the searchable content on a given site, from blogs to landing pages. The index is a compilation of metadata that makes the content form the source easier to parse. At Duo, we often use Apache Solr, a platform-agnostic, open source solution for indexing, as it provides speed, power and its own server capabilities. Finally, the results refers to the front-end experience that compiles and delivers the search results to the user.

The above setup will work fine for most simple websites, but larger organizations often require a more robust solution. With federated search, users can query across multiple sites across different platforms without placing much strain on Drupal, since Apache Solr is handling generating the index and providing results. This is accomplished through some tweaking of the basic site search formula.

Part of what makes this search so powerful is that it takes advantage of Drupal’s backend without relying on its frontend. For that, Apache Solr’s dedicated servers empower this new search solution by shouldering the burden of indexing and providing the results. Before it can work, though, some configuration is needed. Based on this configuration, Apache Solr can encompass searches across different sites – including sites that aren’t built with Drupal. Creating this custom solution, in conjunction with the Search API and Search API Solr modules, will ensure that the different data types being indexed will be standardized.  

As for the results section, the best approach is a decoupled one. Building out the front-end component in the React JavaScript library allows for robust searches without slowing down the rest of the site. By using Drupal’s CMS, Apache Solr and React’s power in coordination, any organization can create a search feature that quickly indexes vast ranges of data and delivers it in an easily digestible manner. For a deeper dive, Palantir has made their demo of federated search available.

This powerful and streamlined take on site search has a variety of applications. Before releasing the solution, Palantir originally developed federated search for the University of Michigan, as each department ran their own sites on different platforms. Federated search now allows users to seamlessly search for information across the entire school’s network, regardless of the technology used to deliver the content. Beyond university ecosystems, federated search also presents an opportunity for eCommerce. Using this solution, products from different vendors can be consolidated into a simple search.

Thanks to Drupal being open source, organizations can utilize federated search and any other contributed solution at any time. This level of openness is what makes Duo such champions of the Drupal platform. At Duo, we’re committed to exploring new features like this and helping each of our partners think outside the box. If you’re ready to start rethinking your website or sites, we’re just a click away.

Categories: Drupal

Languages Dropdown

New Drupal Modules - 16 May 2019 - 9:34am
Categories: Drupal

Pages

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